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E-M10 white balance difficulty

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by dombi, Mar 22, 2014.

  1. dombi

    dombi Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Oct 30, 2013
    I am having a hard time with the E-M10's one touch white balance adjustment.

    With my previous cameras, I could find a white area on a piece of paper, on the wall or elsewhere, and set the WB using that. This adjustment is quite a challenge with the E-M10.

    To use the one touch white balance option, I have to find a white area that completely fills the display. And I also have to make sure that no shadows fall over the display. Which can be quite a difficult task to do.

    Sometimes the white areas in the room are not too large, so I have to walk closer to it. And if I am close, shadows might be present in the display area. And the WB setting will fail.

    This is quite challenging at times. And I don't really understand why I have to fill the complete display, and also make sure that there are no shadows.

    Could you guys share some tips on how you adjust the WB on the E-M10? Is there a better way to do it?
     
  2. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    Personally, I just shot raw and sort it out afterwards. Having said that, I think that the auto WB doesn't do a bad job.
     
  3. dombi

    dombi Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Oct 30, 2013
    Thanks for your answer. RAW is not an option for me. It takes up too much space, and JPG quality is more than enough for me.
    Is this how white balance is set on the E-M5 and E-M1 as well?
     
  4. orfeo

    orfeo Mu-43 Top Veteran

    673
    Sep 27, 2013
    FR
    Puzzling that u have to fill the sensor... Don't have anything Olympus but it looks like a bad use case study in oly tradition.
     
  5. hemuni

    hemuni Mu-43 Regular

    87
    Jun 18, 2014
    So I found this post while looking for an answer to the same problem, only with my e-p5. I finally figured out the answer is to crank up the iso or exposure, if the room doesn't have enough available light. I thought I would share in case others where having similar issues.
    It seems strange that Olympus would use such a cumbersome implementation, especially compared to panasonic where you just have to choose cwb and then tab the screen for a whitepoint. It has never failed me.
    (first post)
     
  6. yakky

    yakky Mu-43 Top Veteran

    662
    Jul 1, 2013
    I've not noticed an issue if you get a shadow in the frame, have others?
     
  7. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    I don't know why you find it so difficult, it's as eazy as selecting CWB and pressing the shutter. A little common sense will tell you not to use a colored object to set WB. If you're Caucasian and don't have a white object or white card, simply use the palm of your hand at a 45 degree angle (just like metering in old days). I find the Olympus WB the be the easiest and most accurate of any digital cameras.
     
  8. hemuni

    hemuni Mu-43 Regular

    87
    Jun 18, 2014
    I usually only set custom white balance in dimly lit conditions to avoid yellow colorcasts and thats when I've had this problem. I found the solution is to crank up the exposure, I was just wondering why my ep5 doesn't figure this out automatically since my gm1 is showing no issues under exactly the same conditions. Setting cwb on the gm1 is as simple as a tab on the screen and the job is done, on my ep5 i have to press info, press the shutter and then confirm, it's just more fiddly compare to the panasonic implementation.
    I am not sure why you are talking about using colored objects to set wb, the op is specifically talking about using a white piece of paper or a white wall. The issue is not the color of the whitepoint, but that the whitepoint is not bright enough for the camera to get a good read.
     
  9. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    I've never had a problem with setting white balance tbh, point it at something neutral (doesn't really have to be white, grey works just fine for me, so a white wall with shadows is generally fine).

    Raw offers many advantages, and it isn't really much bigger than jpeg (I think a large superfine jpeg is 7mb, a raw is around 13mb?), it's worth using in case you make a mistake, a little post processing can fix all number of sins.
     
  10. MNm43

    MNm43 Mu-43 Regular

    104
    Mar 19, 2014
    Well, I'm caucasian, but I'd hardly call my palm neutral white. It might not be a bad zone 6, but that's for exposure, not white balance. The easiest thing to do is to carry a neutral 18% gray card, or folding target which can be used for both exposure and white balance.
     
  11. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    ... a caucasian palm at 45 degrees is 18% ....
     
  12. MNm43

    MNm43 Mu-43 Regular

    104
    Mar 19, 2014
    I don't know where you get that.

    My source is here:
    http://www.normankoren.com/zonesystem.html#Determining

    And this pretty much corresponds to my experience:
    My palm is spot metered at f8:
    [​IMG]

    And my 18% neutral grey card metered at f6.3:
    [​IMG]

    If it works for you that's great, but my palm is at least a stop off middle grey.

    But the OP is talking about white balance, not reflectance. Doing a white balance off your palm isn't going to work.
     
  13. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    A white person is a caucasian but not all caucasians are white. Technically Indians from India are caucasian but their skin color can be very dark. Races are not defined by skin color but rather skeletal and muscular structure.

    Back to the subject. I don't have any problem with my PENs, although they are earlier models. I also got a little toy for helping with white balance, a colorright cap. You just hold it up to the lens and it gives a perfect WB.

    http://colorright.com/colorright_flashright_store/
     
  14. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    ... you deserve a second chance with your test .....
    rotate your palm 90 degrees clockwise from what is shown in your photo .... your thumb should be pointing to the 12 o'clock position, move your palm till it's 45 degrees to the light source.
    This was taught in photography 101 more than 55 years ago, this not new.
    Regarding the WB and a grey card, if you have an OMD E-M5, turn to page 51.
     
  15. MNm43

    MNm43 Mu-43 Regular

    104
    Mar 19, 2014