E-M10 first impressions

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by dixeyk, Jan 6, 2016.

  1. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    It arrived today and overall I like it quite a lot. It's a lot smaller than I thought it would be. I don't know why I'm surprised because I knew it was smaller than the E-M5 I played with...go figure. It also has a much better build quality than I was expecting. It's not quite at the level of my Sony or Fuji bodies but it is still good and certainly nicer than any previous m43 body I have owned. It fits pretty comfortably in hand now that I have added the wrist strap to it and it'll be a very nice small kit with the P20 attached. I like the industrial design of the E-M10 more than I do the E-M10 mk II. I think it looks a bit more cohesive.

    The EVF is a ton better than I was imagining. It's easily as good as any of the Fuji or Sony EVFs I have had despite being lower resolution than most of them. The fact referees rate makes a difference. The live view button mounted to the left side of the EVF took a bit of time to find. The UI/menu are pretty but not laid out in a particularly intuitive way. That said, it's not terrible and you get used to it pretty quickly. The SCP improves things considerably.

    Since my P20 doesn't arrive until tomorrow and I had a Konica AR to m43 adapter laying around I mounted my Konica 40 on the E-M10 and gave it a try. Focus peaking is very similar to the one on the Fuji meaning it's serviceable but not great. I customized the fn1 and fn2 buttons to turn peaking and magnification on and that's pretty handy. I really like the multiple levels of magnification. In a pinch I could definitely use my adapted lenses on the E-M10.

    Overall there is much to like and very few things to complain about. My only real disappointment (and it's pretty minor) is that I find the camera does not feel especially responsive. I'm not sure why but there is definitely something about it that feels a tad slow. I can work with it, there is very little the camera will be used for that will require it to have super fast reflexes but I was expecting it to be a bit more responsive. I'm sure it'll sort itself out.

    My overall take on the E-M10 is that it is more computer than camera. It's design is meant to evoke an old school charm but it is a thoroughly modern device. Where the Fuji cameras do a good job of recreating the analog experience with their cameras the Olympus only looks the part but opts for an unabashedly digital experience. Whether you consider that a good or bad thing is really an individual matter. I can appreciate the appeal of both. As a small take everywhere camera I think the E-M10+P20 will fit the bill nicely. I bought the E-M10 as a way to be able to use the P20 again and while I suppose I could have gone With a cheaper body but I quite like my choice.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2016
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  2. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Looking forward to getting some shots over the next few days and working this camera into my routine.
     
  3. jimr.pdx

    jimr.pdx Mu-43 Veteran

    342
    Dec 5, 2010
    near Longview ~1hr from PDX
    Jim R
    Cameras definitely have computer genes - you can tell because it takes a few hours of reprogramming the controls & defaults before you can cheerfully make use of it :)

    Ah the film days: get the film properly spooled, set the ISO and get to shootin'! And then later to find the film was not properly spooled, one time in twenty.. :oops: or the battery only worked in the warm afternoon.. :dash2:
     
  4. Addicted2light

    Addicted2light Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Nov 13, 2015
    ...or the battery decided to die after months just when you just climbed, at the crack of dawn, on top of a mountain (and you weren't carrying a spare because, come on, it's a film camera, the battery lasts ages!!!)

    Btw, I bought the E-M10 to replace, for casual travels, a toss-away Nikon D3200 that I absolutely hated to use. I fell so hard for the results I'm getting from this little thing that now I'm carrying it around even when I'm out shooting "seriously" alongside my A7r. And most times I like the results of the E-M10 better than the Sony's (resolution aside, obviously).
     
  5. CWRailman

    CWRailman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    564
    Jun 2, 2015
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Denny
    Dead battery was no big problem because all it controlled on our Pentax Spotmatic or MX was the light meter. That's when a photographers skills were put into use. We had to select exposures based on our experience in similar situations.
     
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  6. Addicted2light

    Addicted2light Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Nov 13, 2015
    At that time I had with me a Nikon N90, so without a battery it was just an expensive paperweight. Funny thing is that that morning I left home carrying the Nikon, and not the Minolta SRT101 that would have worked even with a dead battery! :dash2:
     
  7. CWRailman

    CWRailman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    564
    Jun 2, 2015
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Denny
    Now that Minolta SRT101 was a reliable camera. When Pentax started the move to automation with the ME Super, on that body they provided a fully manual non battery related shutter speed of 125 just in case the battery failed. My twin ME Supers were the last film cameras that I purchased as I did not feel comfortable with the battery reliant features on most of the cameras that came after that. I still have both those bodies and associated lenses.
     
  8. Addicted2light

    Addicted2light Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Nov 13, 2015
    I had for quite a bit an ME Super that I used to carry in my cargo pants side pocket kitted with the 40 pancake. Wonderful camera size-wise, but the controls were awkward IMHO.

    Oh and btw, that same Minolta SRT101 is still in my cabinet, sporting its gorgeous 55/1.7 and a few other lenses, and getting used from time to time when I feel shooting something smaller than 6x6 (a Rolleicord III that managed to displace my Hasselblad 500).
     
  9. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Interesting that you observe the EM10 feels less responsive, as I think it feels pretty quick. Is there a specific area of functionality that feels slow to you? Peaking is pretty choppy since it's handled as an art mode, more or less, which is annoying.
     
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  10. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Peaking is fine (and its not handled in the ART mode, I think that was the E-M5 that did that), it's the shot to shot responsiveness. To me to feels about as responsive as my old XE-1 did which isn't bad but compared to say my NEX 5n (which is very fast) it does feel bit leisurely.
     
  11. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Early on I came to appreciate cameras that didn't need a battery to work. That's why I never had modern film bodies...that and the older ones just looked way cooler.
     
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  12. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Well, I meant that the way the camera software handles peaking is still as an art mode, though it's not within the art mode dial any more and can be selected in different modes. The way it's implemented in my Panasonic GM5 is actually way better than my EM10. But that was just a surmise regarding slower responsiveness.

    Do you mean shot-to-shot when you're refocusing between shots, or with the shutter kept half-pressed? Or are you just using an adapted manual lens right now? Since there is actually a lot you can do to fine-tune shutter lag times and such, you might be able to isolate the problem and get things more to your liking.
     
  13. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Thats encouraging. There are times when I prefer the results of my Fuji X10 to the results of other more "serious" cameras I have so I can appreciate what you're saying. If the E-M10 gets out of my way and I can make images with it I'll be happy. So far it handles pretty well. I think it could benefit from a better grip and the rear LCD is stiff as all get out so flipping it down is a two handed operation. Then again the way the controls are oriented it really is designed to be used with the EVF so its understandable. I think as a little AF kit wit the P20 attached it'll be nice.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2016
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  14. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Ahh, I see, my mistake. I don't find the peaking particularly slow but then again I won't be using it so I'm not looking at it critically. Other than today while I am waiting for my P20 to arrive this camera won't ever see an adapted lens. I'll look into the various options to tweak shutter lag. That said, I don't find it objectionably slow. It was really more of an observation that it felt slower than I thought it would be.
     
  15. CWRailman

    CWRailman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    564
    Jun 2, 2015
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Denny
    Ah yes!! The days of the selenium light meters. No batteries needed. I wonder how many of those meters are still working?
     
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  16. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    The P20 arrived this morning and I mounted it on the E-M10 and played around a bit. I dont know what all the hubbub about the slow focus on the P20 is...it's fine.
     
  17. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    23927716910_9b56e95474_b.
    the sleeper wakes
    by kevin dixey, on Flickr

    First shot, ISO 3200, P20 focuses fine, the menus are needlessly complicated but once you get it set up you can mostly avoid them. The metering is pretty good and the images from the E-M10 seems decent. It'll be a great snapshot camera. It's fun to use and the combo with the P20 is really compact. I like it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2016
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  18. Ulfric M Douglas

    Ulfric M Douglas Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 6, 2010
    Northumberland
    Wow!
    I use an X-E1 with a manual lens and that thing is extremely sluggish shot-to-shot compared to my recent Olympii.
     
  19. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Interesting, I could be remembering it wrong but as I recall the X-E1 wasn't that slow but I don't have it anymore so I can't verify it. Then again the point of that statement was to say that I found it a bit slower than my Sony 5n (which I do still have and it is) but not so much that I think it is an issue.
     
  20. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Primarily it's low-light situations with moving subjects, i.e. street photography, that I had trouble with.