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E-M10 black and white filter?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by bozer, Mar 18, 2014.

  1. bozer

    bozer Mu-43 Regular

    57
    Apr 4, 2013
    How do you take black and whites with this camera? What's the best filter? I've only been able to find Film Grain which doesn't look good at all. On my panasonic G2 I could choose black and white, b&w smooth, b&w dynamic, etc. but I can't seem to find anything but film grain b&w or just plain monochrome.
     
  2. billbooz

    billbooz Mu-43 Regular

    198
    Jan 23, 2014
    Lynchburg, VA USA
    William H. Booz
    I shoot B&W almost all the time these days. I love the look! I typically always shoot in Manual Mode. If I think I'm going to get real keepers, I shoot with quality set to Medium Fine JPG + RAW, so I can pull the color version from the RAW file if I want to. I use MF so they will transfer to my iPhone or iPad quickly.

    Under Picture Mode, select Monotone to get standard B&W images. I then use the Orange Color Filter setting, set my Sharpness to +1, and my Contrast to +2. (http://www.infotor.com/blog/more-shooting-in-bw-this-time-using-color-filters/)
     
  3. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    Personally I never take a B&W image. I always take color raw shots to capture the max data. Then I use Nik Silver Efex Pro to create a B&W. Perfect Photo 8 also has a good B&W module.
     
  4. billbooz

    billbooz Mu-43 Regular

    198
    Jan 23, 2014
    Lynchburg, VA USA
    William H. Booz
    Why add the extra step of post-processing if you can get the results in-camera?
     
  5. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    You have way more control creating B/W images in post processing with programs like Lightroom. I can filter on each color channel as much as I want in Lightroom. I am not sure that level of control is possible on a camera.

    --Ken
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    You have far more resources (CPU power, GPU power, memory, software applications) in a laptop or desktop than in any camera. Use the camera to capture the maximum data. Use a computer to create beautiful images from that data.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. dafloyd

    dafloyd Mu-43 Rookie

    23
    Feb 24, 2013
    Munich, Germany
    Dirk Essl
    Open the Super Control Panel by pressing OK
    Go to Picture Mode in the top right corner
    Press OK
    Use the 4 Way control to scroll to the right until you read Monotone
    Done.

    You can add custom B&W filters and tones from the SCP in the third row on the right. I always have tone on Neutral and the Red filter on.

    I shoot RAW and jpg and discard the RAW of I like the jpg.


    Cheers, dirk
     
  8. Swandy

    Swandy Mu-43 Veteran

    362
    Dec 15, 2009
    While I happen to like the Grainy B&W Art Filter (and the B&W version of the Dramatic Tone filter), I do agree that programs like Silver Efex are truly the best to "develop" B&W images because of all the choices they give. I think the only time I do have a camera set to shoot/display Monotone is when I am using an EPL1 that I had converted for Infrared - this way the display shows the B&W IR image when I am shooting.
     
  9. kponds

    kponds Mu-43 Regular

    93
    Mar 18, 2013
    Tennessee
    It's also important to note that when we shot B&W back in the day, we had optical filters that we would use to bring out the image we want. Typically a B&W shooter would use yellow, orange, red, and green filters and some crazy people would use blue filters sometimes.

    Since digital, this is not necessary, because we just shoot a color photograph and then convert to black and white in post, and then we can use the channel mixer to bring out the image we want.

    If we were to shoot monochrome, we would have to use our glass filters again.

    I was actually really excited about two features with OM-D -- that it's monochrome mode can simulate the colored filters, and art filter bracketing. I was hoping I could shoot one shot, and get a jpeg with no filter, and with all of the filters. Even though this still wouldn't be as good as shooting in color and converting in post, it would be a lot of fun for casual shooting and would be like old school B&W shooting on steroids. But alas, it can't do this -- you can get a maximum of two black and white jpegs (using the monochrome picture type and the custom picture type), if you don't count the grainy film and dynamic tone options.

    I do think the "Dynamic B&W" option on some Panasonic cameras consistently makes the best B&W SOOC jpegs that I have ever seen. I wish Olympus had that.


    (I just read above that you said you used Orange filter -- so I guess my explanation is a little redundant. That's definitely the best all around filter (IMO), but you are still missing out on a lot of versatility with not using the channel mixer in post.)
     
  10. billbooz

    billbooz Mu-43 Regular

    198
    Jan 23, 2014
    Lynchburg, VA USA
    William H. Booz
    Thank you, kponds. I do realize that by doing post-processing on an image, one can push the image further - my preference is more contrast than I am achieving even using the simulated digital filters - and enhance the image. I am NOT discounting that. But for casual images and even some real keepers, I have been happy enough with what I get in-camera. However, when I'm serious about a shoot or an outing with my camera, I DO shoot RAW+JPG, so I am able to go back to an image file with all the data. I didn't mean to start a Ford vs Chevy, Windows vs Macintosh war here, believe me! I am just on a personal mission here (for myself) to spend more time TAKING pictures than PROCESSING them after a shoot. I spent years processing every single image I took and last year decided I was going to put more effort into getting images "correct" (again, for me...not trying to please anyone else, except, perhaps, my wife) in-camera and do either no post-processing or as little as possible.
     
  11. bozer

    bozer Mu-43 Regular

    57
    Apr 4, 2013
    I like having a good filter on the camera so that I purposely go out and shoot in B&W. I feel like if I come home and do it in post, I never get the B&W just how I like it. The dynamic B&W on panasonics was great and I'm surprised there's no equivalent on the Olympus