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E-M10. Beginner lens.

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by kubalonek, May 24, 2015.

  1. kubalonek

    kubalonek New to Mu-43

    6
    Mar 21, 2014
    Hi there,

    I decided to buy OM-D E-M10 (there is some cashback action in Europe and new body of OM-D E-M10 cost about 480$). My question is: I used only compact cameras before and I have never had camera with interchangeable lens. What lens I should buy to learn how to take pictures with OM-D? (there is also a discounted price for new M.ZUIKO DIGITAL 45mm 1:1.8 285$ for new one). Can you give me any advice? :)

    greetings
    Jakub
     
  2. DoofClenas

    DoofClenas Who needs a Mirror!

    943
    Nov 9, 2012
    Traverse City, MI
    Clint
    It's a great lens, but if that is your only lens, then you're going to find it a bit long for everyday use. The P15 1.7, O17 1.8, P20 1.7, P25 1.4, or O25 1.8 are much better suited for everyday use. I shot with a P20mm for almost a year on my epm2. In fact, it rarely comes off that camera. A great little lens.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. kubalonek

    kubalonek New to Mu-43

    6
    Mar 21, 2014
    And what about kit lenses 14-42 EZ pancake or normal version. Is it worth to buy them with camera or spend money on other lens (for the beginner).
     
  4. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    Hi Jakub and welcome to the forum.

    There are two kind of lenses: fixed lenses (also called primes) and zoom lenses. Zoom are more versatile and adaptable to different situations and you do not have to change lenses or walk around much. Primes have better image quality, work better in low light and can easily give pictures a blurred background. And can teach you "to see" more then a zoom. So it's like a motorbike vs car thing: there is not a better one.

    If you go for the prime road you usually need at least two or three: a wide one (like a 12 or 14), a normal (middle) one (20, 25, 30), and a tele one (like the 45 or 60 or longer).
    Or even just one, like a 17, 20 or a 25 (but depends a lot on what you shoot).

    With the zooms you can just use a 14-42 (means that covers that range). This would be a 3x zoom in the compact camera world. Adding a 40-150 for distant subjects like animals or sports you get, considering both lenses, a 11x zoom (14x11 = 154).
    Or you can go with the 14-150, covering the same range with a single lens. In general "shorter" zoom have a better image quality then super-zooms but these are in no way bad lenses.

    Or you can do any combo in between: I usually bring a 12-40, the 40-150 a fixed 20mm and a fixed 60mm.

    Which lenses you need depends on what you shoot most: animals, kids, portraits, landscapes, etc.

    When you buy the E-M10 you can get it "body only" or with a 14-42 zoom. This zoom covers 80% of all pictures and is usually a good one to have. One possibility is to add the 45mm, or another prime, that can give you a special look that is almost impossible to get with a zoom.

    The cashback on the 45 is not much, you can probably find a better deal buying a used one.
     
  5. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    If you want to learn photography the hard-way, old-school style, go with only one prime, I suggest the Oly 25mm. It can be fun and very rewarding but also demanding.
    If you want to easily take pictures without investing too much time go for the 14-42. I'd go for the normal one (it's a little better) unless you really need a super compact one to keep the camera always with you.
    Or do both things.
     
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  6. alan1972

    alan1972 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    592
    Jun 23, 2012
    Malaga, Spain
    Alan Grant
    What kind of subjects are you mainly planning to shoot? Do you know what focal lengths you tend to use with compacts?

    Choice of prime lens depends very much on what you want to shoot and on personal preferences. For example I personally find it hard to "see" in wide angle whereas the 45mm somehow seems to fit the way I see the world. Even so I would not want it to be my only lens, there are a lot of situations where you just can't get back far enough. So I take a higher percentage of shots with the 20mm which I find a versatile focal length.

    The non pancake 14-42 usually does not add much to the kit cost and is certainly worth considering. If you are really unsure what focal length you like best it might help you find out before spending money on a prime. But again it depends on what you want to shoot, e.g. how important is shallow depth of field or low light ability.
     
  7. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    If you're getting a cheap 14-42mm, remember that you can also get the Panasonic version. The 14-42mm ASPH II is actually a pretty sharp lens, and performs a bit better than the Olympus version. The Panasonic 12-32mm is also a strong performer, though ends up being a bit more expensive because it's newer.
     
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  8. DoofClenas

    DoofClenas Who needs a Mirror!

    943
    Nov 9, 2012
    Traverse City, MI
    Clint
    A 12-32 and a prime lens like the 25 1.4 would be a great combo.

    As for the kit 14-42 lenses, they're pretty good, but a prime lens (IMHO) is the way to go, especially if you'll be shooting indoors a lot and don't want to use a flash. For me 14mm is not wide enough, which is why, if you can find a used copy of the 12-32 would be a better choice than the 14-42.
     
  9. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    You didn't mention what you want to photograph and in what conditions, so it is hard to give a serious recommendation. The reason you have interchangeable lenses is so you can tailor the lens choice to the conditions and you haven't giving us half the equation.
     
  10. kubalonek

    kubalonek New to Mu-43

    6
    Mar 21, 2014
    First of all thanks for all replies. I'll give you more details. I just want to start my journey with replacable lenses. I have never used it. Probably the 70% of time I will use my camera outdoor to take pictures of landscapes and so on. First of all I want to learn how to use both camera and this kind of lens. I do not move towards professional use. However I don't want to buy lens that will be the waste of money : I hope this helps. So you advise me to buy a body and then search for some used lenses?
     
  11. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Do you already have the EM10, or are you still waiting to buy? The best deal is really going to be picking up the camera with its kit zoom and using that for awhile, until you determine whether there's a need for something that the kit lens doesn't provide. No reason to complicate things with multiple lenses until you know just what you will need and enjoy shooting with
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    The most common approach is to buy the camera with the 14-42 R II kit lens. The price difference is so small that is hard to find a better offer. With this lens you can do almost anything. From here you can add more specialized lenses if needed.

    The more you shoot and look at others pictures the more you will understand what you can and can not do with the kit lens and what else to add (if anything).
     
  13. kubalonek

    kubalonek New to Mu-43

    6
    Mar 21, 2014
    I don't have E-M10 yet! So I can also buy it with kit lens. The cost of E-M10 with 12-42 is not so high. How about pancake one? It it worth to wait for a while to collect more money to buy E-M10 with EZ kit lens or go with just 12-42 II R?
     
  14. Lcrunyon

    Lcrunyon Mu-43 Top Veteran

    758
    Jun 4, 2014
    Maryland
    Loren
    For starting off, and not necessarily knowing your own photography style yet, I would start with a cheap yet decent and versatile lense - i.e., a kit lens. The 14-42 R II already mentioned is a good choice in that it gives you much of the normal focal lengths and is decently sharp. I would also recommend you consider the 12-50. It will cost a little more (but look for one used and get it for peanuts) but it gives you a great amount of flexibility, including more range, a macro function, and better movie capability. Plus it is weather resistant and has a function button. The reason I suggest it is that it opens up more opportunities to explore different types of photography.

    Neither of these are the greatest lenses, and if you find you love photography and want to invest more in it, you will eventually want something faster and sharper (and considerably more expensive). What that is will largely depend on what style and genres you gravitate to, but you can't go wrong with the pro lenses, which already cover a great deal of whatever you may like to shoot. If you are looking to jump into the deep end head-first, the pro lenses are fantastic.

    I wouldn't start out with primes because you may or may not like them. Better to get comfortable with the convenience and flexibility of a zoom and try out primes later. Primes are generally (With the exception of the pro zooms) sharper, (almost always) faster and (always) smaller than zooms, but it isn't as if the zooms have bad image quality, and the primes' advantages come at the sacrifice of convenience and flexibility, which could dampen your enthusiasm as a beginner.
     
  15. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    As far as I know nobody has complaints about the 14-42 R II lens and this lens should also be slightly better optically and better to handle. Instead there are a few users that were disappointed by the pancake for different reasons, nothing huge (see here).
    IMO the R is the better lens, the only advantage of the pancake is the size: consider if this is really important for you to accept a few compromises.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. alan1972

    alan1972 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    592
    Jun 23, 2012
    Malaga, Spain
    Alan Grant
    The R is pretty small to start with, especially when in the locked position for storage, so the size reduction of the EZ may not make much difference in practice. If as you say you would have to wait to make up the extra cost of the EZ I would be inclined to just buy the kit with the R and get started with the learning process right away.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. Carbonman

    Carbonman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 10, 2014
    Vancouver BC
    Graham
    Your first lenses should be the kit 14-42RII and the 40-150R. They are both cheap and light with excellent image quality. They just aren't good for very poor light levels, but the E-M10 built in flash mitigates that problem. The 40-150 is occasionally available for $119 and is a steal as a tele. I'm still using mine until I can get a deal on the 40-150 f2.8 Pro, currently 12x the price.
     
  18. DoofClenas

    DoofClenas Who needs a Mirror!

    943
    Nov 9, 2012
    Traverse City, MI
    Clint
    The "twist to unlock" is one reason I replaced mine...that and it is relatively slow...I'd much rather shoot with one of the fast primes.
     
  19. twokatmew

    twokatmew Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 1, 2012
    Lansing, MI, US
    Margaret
    I replaced my Oly 14-42 II R with the Panna 14-42 II and am very happy with it. No collapsing mechanism, sharper and overall better IQ (IMNSHO), and it's got a 46mm filter thread rather than the Oly's 37mm.
     
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  20. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Panasonic 14-42 II and 45-150 would be my vote. Unless you get crazy good deals on the Olympus ones.

    I would probably pick Olympus 25mm f1.8 as a first/all-around fast prime.
     
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