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E-M1 at Orion Nebula

Discussion in 'Astrophotography' started by PeHa, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. PeHa

    PeHa Mu-43 Veteran

    206
    Nov 12, 2013
    Uppsala, Sweden
    Hi,
    Here's a shot of the Orion Nebula with the E-M1. It's a one single 3 minutes exposure with NR on at ISO 1600. A 500mm refractor telescope (SkyWatcher Equinox 80) was used on a motorized mount. Postprocessed in Lightroom, mainly noise reduction. In high iso long exposures, the E-M1 gives more noise than E-M5 or PM2 which is my second camera but it can be removed, as seen. BR//Per

     

    Attached Files:

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  2. Iconindustries

    Iconindustries Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    G'day Per, This is quite a nice image, what was the ambient temperature at the time? The noise look pretty good!

    I'm very impressed with the tracking, 5 minute subs at 500mm FL with a 2x crop sensor (around 30X magnification) with only slight trailing is great! You must have had a good polar alignment.

    It's unfortunate about the red gradient in the top half of the image, were you imaging in an area with lights around? It looks like a bit of light may have been shining into the scope.

    Have you done any stacking before? It would dramatically reduce any noise and, if you took some shorter exposures (1 to 2 minutes) and stacked them with your longer subs you would be able to avoid blowing out the core of M42.

    Cheers
    Jo
     
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  3. PeHa

    PeHa Mu-43 Veteran

    206
    Nov 12, 2013
    Uppsala, Sweden
    Hi Jo,
    Yes, guess I was lucky with the alignment this eve (though its just a three minute sub). The temperature at the time was around 0 degrees Celsius. The mount is a Skywatcher EQ5. Imaging was made in a suburb with lights around, yes, so I was using a city light filter (baader l-booster). The area above this nebula is, as you know, an area with other nebulas like the horse head, so I kind of hoped that the red area in the image was natural :) But I guess it's just leaked city light despite the filter after all...

    I've done stacking a few times with Deep Sky Stacker but not with different length of the subs. I was kind of wondering how to not blow the core but still get more light on the whole nebula, that should be the answer, thanks :)
    //Per
     
  4. PhilS

    PhilS Mu-43 Veteran

    261
    Oct 24, 2012
    Brisbane, Australia
    Phil Savory
    Here is my shot of M42 with my OMD EM5. Shot on my 102mm F7 refractor on an Ioptron IEQ30 equatorial mount. Its 11x20sec images combined in Deep Sky Stacker..I also had a light pollution filter in the imaging chain.
    Shot from Brisbane city end of December. I was having difficulty with the polar alignment at this stage so went for short exposures.

    Ask me about any recent astro images ... haaaah.. 2 months of cloudy cr@ppy skies.. come on.. give us a break.

    PeHa.. the detail in the nebula in your image is beautiful.. you did a great job.

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/95752256@N03/11269116686/player/f95f77b4c2" height="659" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>
     
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  5. rpringle

    rpringle Mu-43 Regular

    102
    Jan 9, 2014
    I would agree that the red haze is from city lights most likely. You might be able to take care of this in post by playing with the black slider in Lightroom, or the exposure tool in Photoshop. That's a great capture for a first try. Mine looks terrible in comparison unguided with my E-P5 and 135mm 2.8 minolta lens.
     
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  6. aloysius

    aloysius Mu-43 Regular

    57
    Dec 18, 2012
    Nevada City, California
    My real name is unreal
    That's awfully nice for a single, 3-minute exposure, PeHa. I also see more noise in long-exposures from the E-M1 than the E-M5, especially color noise. The E-M1's noise can be handled pretty well in post-processing, though. It works great for low light concert photography with 'normal' exposure lengths. The color gradient in your image can be reduced in Lightroom (or other apps) too.

    Phil, your 20 second subexposures captured more detail in the bright core (less clipping), and stacking a bunch of subs brings up the nebulosity like in PeHa's image. Orion is a tough target because it's brightness range is greater than sensors can capture. I want to try HDR.

    I was working on the Orion Nebula a month ago when my mount took a dive onto concrete. (Bad idea.) Since fixing the mount, it's been Cloud City. Is Orion still there?
     
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  7. PeHa

    PeHa Mu-43 Veteran

    206
    Nov 12, 2013
    Uppsala, Sweden
    PhilS, I think you've gathered a lot of light and details for being just 20 secs subs. My refractor ha a diameter of 80 (focal length 500), yours is 102 (focal length ???) which partly could explain why.

    Agree about the weather though I'm as far away from you as possible on earth :) its cloudy 99 days of 100 .... :(

    //Per
     
  8. tbyork2012

    tbyork2012 Mu-43 Veteran

    213
    Nov 14, 2012
    Oxford, UK
    Perhaps it is supposed to be like this, with reddish appearance surrounding some parts of the Orion Nebula, whereas other parts are dark/black. As it so happens, my friend sent me this link today after I shared with him about imaging Orion: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_Molecular_Cloud_Complex

    Boon
     
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  9. rpringle

    rpringle Mu-43 Regular

    102
    Jan 9, 2014
    I'm no expert but to me it looks like an aberration of some kind seeming it only covers half the frame. I think the red clouds show up on IR images or on very long exposures. Other enthusiast photos I've seen of Orion don't have the purple haziness I see above. I would think if the Em1 is picking up the dust cloud it would be evenly distributed across the frame not over half of it. That's what makes me think either light pollution or some glare on the front element of the telescope might be the culprit. I would try it perhaps without the light pollution filter as that might have had glare on it, or using some sort of shade on the front.

    Undoubtedly imaging would be better in the country where light pollution is minimal or non existent. I'm lucky because where I live 20 miles from any large city I can literally go in my backyard and get pretty good seeing, if I drive an hour north it becomes crystal clear. Now I just need to get some kind of tracker because as of right now I've only done wide fields, star trails, and very bad stacked images of Andromeda and Orion.

    As a side note from what I've heard the "problem" with the EM1 as far as low light noise is due to the lack of AA filter. Which means sharper detail but more noise compared to models that have come before. However from what I've seen this doesn't seem to be a problem if you use NR or dark frame subtracting with DSS.

    I'd like to see more imaging from you Peha or anyone, I always get excited to see the potential of M43 cameras especially coupled with nice tele trackers that I'll probably never be able to afford. :smile:
     
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  10. PeHa

    PeHa Mu-43 Veteran

    206
    Nov 12, 2013
    Uppsala, Sweden
    interesting wikipedia link..checking in stellarium also says the area above is a red nebula area, so.... whatever, i will try from a place with less or no city lights when the cloudy weather ends. with a little less focal length i think you can have the horse head nebula, orion nebula, running man nebula and also the flame nebula in one single image... would be a nice "project" goal!

    the em1 noise is not a problem if you are using NR = DSS up to about a minute exposures but for longer exposures especially high iso ones, the em5 or pm2 does better regarding noise, even with NR on, i've compared. maybe the DR of the em1 compensates and the noise is easy to filter? will try the pm2 and compare next time.
    /Per