DXO @ 25,600

Bristolero

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
May 15, 2017
Messages
786
Location
Alaska/New Zealand
We've all heard about DXO Prime's superb processing at high ISOs. This was really brought down to me during a recent nighttime walk along the beach at Russell, NZ. My wife and I were very slightly lit by a streetlight shining through the branches of a Norfolk Pine. Other than this and a few harbor lights, it was really quite dark. Just fooling around I shot my EM1.1, 12-40 @ 1/8 sec and ISO 25,600. I then ran the raw file through both LR 5 and DXO Photolab. Here they are:
1803_untitled_409.jpg
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OOC with LR 5.

1803_untitled_409_DxO.jpg
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OOC with DXO Prime.

I realize I could have tweaked LR to produce better results, but I'm amazed at the ease of Prime for these high ISO shots.
 
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ijm5012

Mu-43 Legend
Joined
Oct 2, 2013
Messages
7,990
Location
Pittsburgh, PA
Real Name
Ian
Not only noise reduction, but also sharpening. These two areas are where I find DXO blows LR out of the water. Really, the only thing I miss LR for is HDR and Panoramic merging. What I'll do now is make my edits in DXO first, then export to LR to merge as needed.
 

Bristolero

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
May 15, 2017
Messages
786
Location
Alaska/New Zealand
Not only noise reduction, but also sharpening. These two areas are where I find DXO blows LR out of the water. Really, the only thing I miss LR for is HDR and Panoramic merging. What I'll do now is make my edits in DXO first, then export to LR to merge as needed.
Coincidently Ian, these were taken with your old O 12-40. I'm enjoying it!
 

Turbofrog

Mu-43 Legend
Joined
Mar 21, 2014
Messages
5,362
To be honest, I think my preference would be for the LR output, as long as the black levels and contrast were adjusted to wipe out that purple tone in the shadows (which would significant reduce the visible noise, too). But I think it's just the way I'm wired. Noise reduction really gives me the heeby-jeebies, I much prefer the aesthetic effect of uniform noise, even if its significant, vs. blotchy and smudgey, which is the inevitable outcome of even the best noise reduction algorithms, especially when combined with any sharpening.

I'm not sure that I've ever set the luminance noise reduction above 0 on a photo that I would consider a keeper. Chroma noise reduction is fine though, it really doesn't disrupt the "look" of the photo in anywhere near the same way.

It might also be why I can still stand the look of film, while everyone else seems allergic to even the finest of grain.
 

ADemuth

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Jan 27, 2017
Messages
473
Location
Great Bend, KS
To be honest, I think my preference would be for the LR output, as long as the black levels and contrast were adjusted to wipe out that purple tone in the shadows (which would significant reduce the visible noise, too). But I think it's just the way I'm wired. Noise reduction really gives me the heeby-jeebies, I much prefer the aesthetic effect of uniform noise, even if its significant, vs. blotchy and smudgey, which is the inevitable outcome of even the best noise reduction algorithms, especially when combined with any sharpening.

I'm not sure that I've ever set the luminance noise reduction above 0 on a photo that I would consider a keeper. Chroma noise reduction is fine though, it really doesn't disrupt the "look" of the photo in anywhere near the same way.

It might also be why I can still stand the look of film, while everyone else seems allergic to even the finest of grain.

If I pixel peep these, I hate the DxO. When I zoom out though, I'd pass on the LR any day.

I love love love film grain. I shot T-Max 3200 with my Minox, and sometimes I'd push it a couple of stops (those pictures looked more like the floor of an Italian kitchen after dinner rush than photographs, but that was the point). Those were my experimental "artsy" days, but Tri-X 400 (pushed a stop if i was shooting medium format) was my go to because I liked the grain.

Having said that, I hate hate hate digital grain. There something artificial about it. I also tend to dislike when film grain is digitally added, though in not hard set against that.
 
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