Drip at 1/4000 Flash Sync

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by RonSmith, May 23, 2010.

  1. RonSmith

    RonSmith Mu-43 Top Veteran

    505
    Apr 7, 2010
    Michigan
    I was playing around with high speed flash sync last night.

    GF1 with 45/2.8 Macro Elmarit and Panasonic FL360
    1/4000 at f5 200ISO

    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 24
  2. Streetshooter

    Streetshooter Administrator Emeritus Subscribing Member Charter Member

    Dec 15, 2009
    Phila, Pa USA
    Ron,
    Good job....
    That's a perfect image for the new Image Quest...
    Shooter
     
  3. jay395

    jay395 Mu-43 Rookie

    15
    Apr 7, 2012
    how did you get your camera to high speed sync, im not sure if my g3 does?
     
  4. sprinke

    sprinke Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 5, 2011
    Pasadena, CA
    Real Name:
    Debi
    You have to have a speedlight that supports HSS with :43:. There are only a few of them; notably the OEM Oly and Panasonic, and the Metz. Maybe Nissin? (not sure about that)
     
  5. jay395

    jay395 Mu-43 Rookie

    15
    Apr 7, 2012
    ummm ok, so once i plugged it in it will allow me to go beyond 1/160, what flash do you use?
    thanks
     
  6. songs2001

    songs2001 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    693
    Jul 8, 2011
    You don't really need to do that if want to freeze water. Flash duration is very short. So as long as there is no ambient, you can use 1/160 and still freeze water.
     
  7. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    830
    Feb 29, 2012
    Or just bring up a desk lamp and shoot 1/4000. Lots of options.
     
  8. sprinke

    sprinke Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 5, 2011
    Pasadena, CA
    Real Name:
    Debi
    What flash do YOU have? That's more to the point.

    On my flash (Metz AF-50), I have to change the settings on the flash itself in order to enable HSS. There is no setting on the camera (GH2).
     
  9. rparmar

    rparmar Mu-43 Top Veteran

    639
    Jun 14, 2011
    Limerick, Ireland
    There seems to be some confusion here, though I'm no flash expert. High Speed Sync is not possible unless the camera allows it, since it is synchronised with the shutter (front and rear curtain). I always figured that was the very definition of HSS.

    However, even if the camera does not support this mode, one can still freeze water etc. by going completely manual. I just tried this by setting my camera in manual mode and making sure it was not getting enough ambient light to properly expose the scene. Using a remote trigger on the hotshoe I set off a Metz flash also in manual mode. I needed to adjust the flash strength down quite a bit, since I was in a smaller room with lots of reflection. This was sufficient to stop a dripping tap and should be good enough to stop just about anything, since the flash beam illuminates for a very brief period.

    There's no need for any special modes or HSS at all.
     
  10. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    830
    Feb 29, 2012
    The flash does all the work. The camera only conveys the shutter speed to the flash and that exposure has started, and the flash pulses it's output during the exposure to ensure that the frame is evenly lit. So when shooting say 1/1000, the flash may need to fire 4 or 5 times as the front and rear curtain move together in a slit across the focal plane. The timing must be precise, otherwise the lighting is uneven.
     
  11. songs2001

    songs2001 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    693
    Jul 8, 2011
    HSS will allow to get some ambient background. If you look at the picture above, you can see the background is lit. If you did it with your method, the background would be completely dark.

    Your method probably freezes action better, flash duration can be as quick as 1/16000 of a second.
     
  12. jay395

    jay395 Mu-43 Rookie

    15
    Apr 7, 2012
    I wanted to know to help me darken the ambient with the shutter allowing me to use the flash for my subject. I cant really do it as i can only go to 1/160 of a second.
    I didnt really want to but might have to go back to dslr :(
     
  13. songs2001

    songs2001 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    693
    Jul 8, 2011
    If you are trying to do it in daylight. You'll probably need ND filters. Unless you're really close to the subject, you'll need to get a powerful flash.
     
  14. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    830
    Feb 29, 2012
    Do you have a specific scenario in mind? Indoors vs outdoors? It's not hard once you understand the principles, but there are limitations. Because of the way HSS works - multiple pulses, the power is often down to 1/4 and less, so you won't have the full power of the flash to work with, you have to get a whole lot closer.
     
  15. meyerweb

    meyerweb Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Sep 5, 2011
    A DSLR will make no difference in this scenario. With either a DSLR or an m43 camera, you need a flash that supports high speed sync, or FP mode as some manufacturers call it. As was already stated above in post #4.

    An Oly FL36R, or the older FL36 if you can find one used, will do what you want.
     
  16. songs2001

    songs2001 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    693
    Jul 8, 2011
    Or a Nikon D40/D50/D70
     
  17. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    He still hasn't responded Sprinke's question as to what flash he has, so we don't know if his flash is capable of FP flash. If he's looking to keep the background dark while keeping the subject properly exposed, he doesn't need the FP function, simple manual control of both flash and camera will do the trick.