Does the thought of various dangers keep you from shooting in the city?

Saftey Concerns about imaging in the city

  • I am under 30 and am concerned about imaging in the city

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I am under 30 and am not concerned about imaging in the city

    Votes: 1 1.5%
  • I am 31-45 and am concerned about imaging in the city

    Votes: 5 7.7%
  • I am 31-45 and am not concerned about imaging in the city

    Votes: 15 23.1%
  • I am 46-55 and am concerned about imaging in the city

    Votes: 2 3.1%
  • I am 46-55 and am not concerned about imaging in the city

    Votes: 12 18.5%
  • I am 56 or older and am concerned about imaging in the city

    Votes: 5 7.7%
  • I am 56 or older and am not concerned about imaging in the city

    Votes: 17 26.2%
  • I have no fear, I carry

    Votes: 7 10.8%
  • I don't leave my yard anymore

    Votes: 1 1.5%

  • Total voters
    65
Status
Not open for further replies.

Phocal

Mu-43 Legend
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,496
Location
Anchorage
Thanks for the reply, looking forward to some pics of the wildlife from up there. Enjoy it while you're there.
You are welcome and I do plan on enjoying while I am here. I am working on planning a 7-10 day backpacking/packrafting trip for 2021 in Gates of the Arctic National Park. Park is super remote and has little information about it, most rivers/peaks/lakes are un-named and there are no roads into the park. Will spend this summer talking with people and bush pilots to get an idea of where to go.

Incase you missed my first two post from here:

Gorgeous is Foxy
When Thinks Work Out
 

barry13

Mu-43.com Editor
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
9,784
Location
Southern California
Real Name
Barry
Why would it be that you guys in the US seem scared and the rest not really ?
I’ve been to Europe a couple times (over a month total) and other than two attempts to swipe my cell phone by friendly-seeming thieves, never felt threatened. Months spent in China, no problems.

But the homeless population in at least west coast US cities is dramatically expanding, and many are schizophrenic. In some cities at night, more than half of the people on the street are homeless.
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
1,511
Location
Baltimore, MD

ralf-11

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Jan 16, 2017
Messages
1,405
It might have to do with healthcare. Other countries, at least in the developed world, have comprehensive healthcare - the US doesn't. I know there are lots of homeless in Paris however.

Anyway, the US has lots of mentally ill roaming the streets without healthcare or treatment. Some fraction of them are dangerous. Knifings are not uncommon among the mentally ill homeless - at least on the West coast. On top of that is a serious problem with meth, gang violence, and trafficking of young girls.

I live in a small university city of 160,000 and the sorority girls here are now afraid to go out on the streets much - all in the last year. There are attacks on innocent citizens here every month.
 

stratokaster

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Jan 4, 2011
Messages
1,573
Location
Dublin, IE
Real Name
Pavel
I'm originally from an industrial town in Russia. I spent 10 years in Ukraine living on the outskirts of Kyiv in an area which was considered "not nice". I also lived in the US for 14 months.

Baltimore is by far the scariest place I've been to. When we were visiting it for the first time, we were actually stopped by an old lady who told us in a hushed voice: "Don't go there, you're walking into the hood!"
 

dirtdevil

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Messages
903
Why would it be that you guys in the US seem scared and the rest not really ?
You feel totally safe in the suburbs of Paris, Malmö, Moleenbeek and Birmingham? In North America, you have that type of troublemakers downtown, not in the periphery of the city like in European cities which is easier to avoid. Add to that the daily culture of "low level instincts" of the american media (glorification of a violent lifestyle, etc and it has nothing to do with politics)...
 

Joris

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Feb 24, 2018
Messages
340
Location
Picardie, France
lots of homeless in Paris
Yes and they are not considered a risk. By the way refugees from all over Africa and Asia roam the countryside around Calais, hoping to hitch a ride or a boat, or even to swim to enter Britain for obscure reasons. They also in no way are considered presenting a risk to the locals.
 

Brownie

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Sep 3, 2018
Messages
2,083
Location
SE Michigan
Real Name
Tim
get something bigger than a pop gun

I own a small arsenal. My carry gun is the Ruger LCR because it's small, light, stupid simple and has the best DAO trigger pull I have ever used. Those large magazine pop guns others like to carry are for people who don't know how to shoot. If I need more than 5 shots I am in a situation that I should never have let myself get into.

Now that I am in Alaska I am on the lookout for another 357 with a longer barrel for wilderness carry. The range on that Ruger is not that great and if I am going to have to shoot a bear I would rather it a bit farther away than the Ruger can accurately shoot. For backcountry carry I prefer revolvers because they are so simple and little can go wrong with them.
Look for an older Ruger Security Six. They were SS with adjustable sights, pretty sure available with 4" and 6" bbls. Mine is a 6". I've had mine for a very long time.

However, I would never carry a .357 on the street. Remember, you're responsible for every shot that leaves the barrel. I am happy with my .380 LCP. 6 rounds of critical defense ammo will do it. Sometimes I wonder if people imagine themselves getting into a gunfight and needing so many rounds. Honestly, a self defense situation is going to happen almost within arm's length the vast majority of the times. If you're 25' away you should be running, not shooting.
 

Joris

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Feb 24, 2018
Messages
340
Location
Picardie, France
You feel totally safe in the suburbs of Paris, Malmö, Moleenbeek and Birmingham? In North America, you have that type of troublemakers downtown, not in the periphery of the city like in European cities which is easier to avoid. Add to that the daily culture of "low level instincts" of the american media (glorification of a violent lifestyle, etc and it has nothing to do with politics)...
Europe is big, I live in the countryside. My ex was a musician taking her $150K violin with her daily in the subway through the Parisian suburbs. Once she tripped in her concert costume. Two friendly men helped her up and handed her the case with the violin.
Not that there is no crime, but there seems not to be much paranoia.

It would seem Americans carry guns, scared of other people carrying guns.
 

Brownie

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Sep 3, 2018
Messages
2,083
Location
SE Michigan
Real Name
Tim
Why would it be that you guys in the US seem scared and the rest not really ?
Not scared, prepared. I've seen your hometown and where you take most of your photographs. Welcome to Detroit.

A couple of things:
I would HIGHLY recommend that anyone here take a CPL class, or CCW, or whatever it's called in your area, even if you never intend on owning a gun. The class is heavily geared toward avoiding conflict and situational awareness. Those in this thread that have cited SA are 100% correct, but there's way more to it than looking around. The course in Michigan includes a demonstration of how quickly things can happen. In one case, a person can start running at you from 25' away, and you do not have enough time to even draw the weapon, much less fire. If he had a knife or a bat you'd be done for. Lesson? 25' is as close as you want to let a sketchy looking person get. Make eye contact, always. Criminals do not want you to be able to identify them. So, make sure the person knows you saw them. This also leads to how many attacks happen from behind so you have no chance of an ID. Keep your head on a swivel and out of your phone. Bent heads are a target for this very reason. There are tons of ways to be prepared without needing a weapon. Personally, I rarely carry in everyday life. If I am going somewhere that could be risky, or if I don't know the area, it goes with me.
 

Joris

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Feb 24, 2018
Messages
340
Location
Picardie, France
Not scared, prepared. I've seen your hometown and where you take most of your photographs. Welcome to Detroit.

A couple of things:
I would HIGHLY recommend that anyone here take a CPL class, or CCW, or whatever it's called in your area, even if you never intend on owning a gun. The class is heavily geared toward avoiding conflict and situational awareness. Those in this thread that have cited SA are 100% correct, but there's way more to it than looking around. The course in Michigan includes a demonstration of how quickly things can happen. In one case, a person can start running at you from 25' away, and you do not have enough time to even draw the weapon, much less fire. If he had a knife or a bat you'd be done for. Lesson? 25' is as close as you want to let a sketchy looking person get. Make eye contact, always. Criminals do not want you to be able to identify them. So, make sure the person knows you saw them. This also leads to how many attacks happen from behind so you have no chance of an ID. Keep your head on a swivel and out of your phone. Bent heads are a target for this very reason. There are tons of ways to be prepared without needing a weapon. Personally, I rarely carry in everyday life. If I am going somewhere that could be risky, or if I don't know the area, it goes with me.
Here one does not feel any need at all to be prepared. And I am not a naive person :)
 

Phocal

Mu-43 Legend
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,496
Location
Anchorage
Look for an older Ruger Security Six. They were SS with adjustable sights, pretty sure available with 4" and 6" bbls. Mine is a 6". I've had mine for a very long time.

However, I would never carry a .357 on the street. Remember, you're responsible for every shot that leaves the barrel. I am happy with my .380 LCP. 6 rounds of critical defense ammo will do it. Sometimes I wonder if people imagine themselves getting into a gunfight and needing so many rounds. Honestly, a self defense situation is going to happen almost within arm's length the vast majority of the times. If you're 25' away you should be running, not shooting.
A time so long ago it feels like a different life I was an EMT working one of the worse areas of Houston. Having seen way to many guys walking who shouldn't because some drug or another I know my 357 will at least knock them down so I can get away.

You are right about everything else. It's why I am comfortable with my 5 shot short barrel gun. If I am out of comfortable range to hit center mass then I am heading the other way.
 

agentlossing

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Jun 26, 2013
Messages
4,443
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
It might have to do with healthcare. Other countries, at least in the developed world, have comprehensive healthcare - the US doesn't. I know there are lots of homeless in Paris however.

Anyway, the US has lots of mentally ill roaming the streets without healthcare or treatment. Some fraction of them are dangerous. Knifings are not uncommon among the mentally ill homeless - at least on the West coast. On top of that is a serious problem with meth, gang violence, and trafficking of young girls.

I live in a small university city of 160,000 and the sorority girls here are now afraid to go out on the streets much - all in the last year. There are attacks on innocent citizens here every month.
I don't know what the answer is regarding homeless, mentally ill people. It's very sad, and very prevalent along the west coast. My intuition is that the vast majority of these have been wrecked by drugs - which isn't an accusation necessarily, because many people are born into the drug situation and had it forced on them long before they were mature enough to make a decision one way or another. Oregon has a particularly strange viewpoint since the possession of hard drugs like heroin and meth has been reduced to a misdemeanor, and, in the case of the county where I live, jails are perennially undersized, meaning that "catch and release" is the default. You don't "use" these kinds of drugs "in moderation" rather they use you, and all of the issues that come along with them do lead many people to lose jobs, homes and the understanding of family, leading to homelessness and a constantly decreasing mental state. In other cases, I am sure the problem is developmentally related and has been with the person from early in their lives, and whoever was a part of their lives has either been pushed out or grown tired and left.

I don't think about other people in a fearful way; I don't curtail my life based on fear of being harmed. But I acknowledge that I can't foresee the one time that someone troubled will snap, or I might unwittingly do something that causes a disproportionate response. Generally I just accept the small amount of risk, in fact I rarely think about it. Occasionally I act like Sherlock Holmes and stick the revolver in my coat pocket (by the right so issued by the authorities in the form of a carry permit) but I really do not look at a weapon as some kind of good luck charm, talisman of empowerment or anything else. I do think that there are a lot of people who feel an aura of bloodshed or violence or the mark of the grim reaper around the presence of or look of or conversation about guns, they are generally people who do not support the private ownership and/or carry of them. But the reality is, they are just tools, ones with such limited application that I rarely consider the added weight of a five-iron loaded with .38 hollow-point to be worth carrying the thing around. It does not empower me or give me an air of invincibility or really make me feel anything at all except an added sense of care to make sure I keep it safely when out and about. What would help the conversation about this kind of thing is to remember that they are not that different from cameras, just with infinitely fewer applications. The fact that some people are fearful or have an inferiority complex that is bolstered by their view of the tool being some kind of talisman of strength is frankly just as naïve as those who are scared of the idea of private ownership. We unfortunately can't fix the deficiencies of people's intellect or morality any more than we can fix the tragically mentally ill who are on the streets - in both cases, the person must themselves want to be helped.

Let's not even get into the booming human trafficking trade on the west coast, of which the interstate through Oregon is a main artery. It takes nothing further than digging into local news sites throughout CA, OR and WA to see that it is a massive, and truly scary, problem. Again, life is always a calculated risk.
 

PeeBee

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Sep 17, 2012
Messages
1,447
Location
UK
On occasion, I've exposed myself to unnecessary risks. High speed motorcycling, walking along a crumbling cliff face, leaning over a high balcony or roof edge, hot air balloon flights, climbing insecure structures, shooting big cats through an open car window, telling the wife her bum looks big in that outfit etc, etc. All of these have the potential to cause harm or death.

I have a fear of heights yet I'll climb as high as possible. I love driving in bad weather and I find myself strangely drawn to the coast during storms. When the weather guy says stay away and only travel if necessary, I hear "get your ass down here now". 2 weeks ago I was standing at the water's edge during storm Ciara, struggling to stay on my feet. There is a significantly higher chance of me being involved in an accident than being a victim of violent crime, yet I continue to pursue higher risk activities whist avoiding areas I consider unsafe. I guess it all comes down to the illusion of being in control.
 
Last edited:

exakta

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Jun 2, 2015
Messages
618
I don't know what the answer is regarding homeless, mentally ill people.
A lot of the mentally ill homeless problem comes from the federal government reducing or eliminating funding under President Reagan. Here in Massachusetts a number of "state hospitals" were closed back then. One near my house has recently been razed and condos are going up in it's place.
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
1,511
Location
Baltimore, MD
A lot of the mentally ill homeless problem comes from the federal government reducing or eliminating funding under President Reagan. Here in Massachusetts a number of "state hospitals" were closed back then. One near my house has recently been razed and condos are going up in it's place.
Every state has those. It's not as simple as the Reagan admin defunding the sites, though, while each started out with good intentions, over time they were almost all overloaded and understaffed until the entire industry was judged to be unsavable and closed down. Psychiatric tactics changed from warehousing to embedding in the community, but many of those sadly turned out to be problematic as well as the rush to close down the sites overcame limited resources.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest posts

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Mu-43 is a fan site and not associated with Olympus, Panasonic, or other manufacturers mentioned on this site.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2009-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom