1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

Does anyone have the Photojojo Expedition wooden tripod?

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Holoholo55, Aug 19, 2015.

  1. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    I just happened on a mention of this on macworld.com, of all places, and was instantly fascinated. Had not heard of it before, but it's been out since 2011. Still selling for $290, which I thought was reasonable for this. Does anyone have it or even seen one? I'm entranced, but would like to hear from others. Surprised that there aren't any reviews by photo sites.

    Check out the photos. Isn't it gorgeous?

    http://photojojo.com/store/awesomeness/wood-camera-tripod/

    Made by Berlebach, but apparently not in Berlebach's catalog. https://www.berlebach.de/?sprache=english

    BTW, I was told by an astrophotography enthusiast, who was buying my friend's Celestron 8 telescope with a very large wooden tripod and equatorial mount, that he wanted it because of the wooden tripod. He said it dampened vibrations better than anything.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2015
  2. tyrphoto

    tyrphoto Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 25, 2014
    Seoul | NYC
    ㅇtㅈyㅅr
    It looks nice but functionally it doesn't look that great. There are spaced holes for each leg and you won't be able to make minute adjustments if needed to level the tripod as well as taking longer to extend the tripod for each use. I'd also question the durability of wood versus a good carbon fiber tripod for outdoor use.
     
  3. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    I don't see those holes in the hi-res photos. I think it's like most wooden tripods I've seen where the legs simply slide past each other and are held by friction with the clamps. Like a surveyor's transit tripod. I think the wood needs care, like all materials, but is certainly not prone to corrosion.

    Oh wait, I do see some holes near the back of one of the legs, but they look like stops to prevent the leg from sliding out from the clamp.

    http://photojojo.com/store/press/photos/wood-camera-tripod

    I just like how it looks. That it might actually be functional would be a bonus. :)

    BTW, I sent Photojojo an inquiry asking for more specs and details on the Expedition. I'll share if I get a response.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015
  4. PacNWMike

    PacNWMike Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Dec 5, 2014
    Salish Sea
    guess?
    I have a lot of experience using wooden tripods outdoors under rough conditions on a daily basis surveying in the mountains for a forestry company. Sun, rain, snow, wind. One good whack and that $¢£¥ carbon fiber would be junk. Wood just keeps on going. Need a little more maintenance for sure but does not fail catastrophically. Vibration dampening is the best.

    I recommend checking out Ries tripods. Made in WA state near Spokane I think. Top of my wish list if I had the money.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. gr6825

    gr6825 Mu-43 Veteran

    277
    Oct 10, 2012
    Agree with PacNWMike. Carbon fiber certainly has a weight advantage, but durability is not one of its selling features.
     
  6. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    Took a look at the Ries tripods site. Fascinating. Yes, more expensive than the PhotoJojo Expedition, which seems like a bargain, but not out of line if you're considering a good carbon fiber tripod or even more so, a Gitzo. I'm not surprised that Ansel Adams used one of their tripods. Back in his day, I bet most photo tripods were made of wood. It would have been a rarity to find one in aluminum, like the TiltAll.
     
  7. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    I think you miss the point. Sometimes the attraction of a thing is the way it is designed, the way it is made, the workmanship, etc. That is why the OP asked: "Isn't it gorgeous?" and why he says: "I just like how it looks. That it might actually be functional would be a bonus."

    I have a 70+ year old English army prismatic marching compass. Among other things, its compass card is mother-of-pearl. These compasses are said to comprise around 120 individual parts. For a compass! I have absolutely no need for a compass, but I own this one because it gives me pleasure to own such an object. I think that is where the OP is coming from as well.
     
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1