Do artists care about sensor size?

Lupin 3rd

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I came across a couple documentaries, one about Daido Moriyama and one about Miyako Ishiuchi. While watching the videos I noticed both of these are shooting street photography with what seem like small point and shoot cameras.

Here are the videos, btw:



I guess my insecurity is such that I find it somewhat comforting to see renown artists using point and shoot cameras for (at least some of) their work. Or maybe I need the occasional reminder that sensor size isn't everything, and that art depends on a whole lot more than having a fancy camera. Not that I'm an artist! :biggrin:

Also this helps talk me off the ledge of buying needing wanting a medium format camera... :biggrin:
 

BosseBe

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Well, as a nonfamous nonartist, I must say that size doesn't matter as long as you have the art down pat!
You can always get good results if you pay attention to your subject and its needs.
The tools you use for this is secondary.
😎
 

retiredfromlife

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I hate to say it but to me it seems Mu-43 users worry the most, others may comment on it on the forums but worry not.

I think it best to ignore the whole subject, sit back relax and take more photos :drinks:

Edit, for my response I think of Care and worry on forums as being the same, but that is just me
 
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doady

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Imagine doing street photography with a medium format camera. Might be difficult. These photographers chose a small camera? Maybe they DO care about sensor size.
 

jimr.pdx

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Size insecurity is ingrained in human society, in so many different ways. Those who have enough know it, those unsure will always be swayed by something that costs a bit more and promises great rewards.

I'm practically blushing, this is a photo forum right?
 

alex66

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Depends on what they are trying to do, people like Gursky, Wall, Soth etc went for large format 10x8 in a good few cases as that gave them the results the aimed for. Some like Daido go for a small camera as it is good enough or better than the quality they aim for. Also alot will come down to how the process is, a large format camera is a slow methodical beast to use, small format cameras like ours or 35mm sized can be used fast in an almost think it see it shoot it way. So yes they will consider the camera but mostly down to what they want to achieve. Also talking to artist that use paint as their medium they are very very particular to what brushes and brands or components of the paints they use.
 

agentlossing

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When I saw your title, I suspected Moriyama might show up! In fact, both of the photographers are Japanese. I think that may say something. A lot of Japanese photography has a strong graphic element; contrast and balance are prominent. Looking at Moriyama's work on its own makes it clear why he wouldn't care about dynamic range, shallow DoF or lots of detail. He actively obscures detail, to an effect that I could only wish to replicate. I love his photos.

There are photographers who rely on the specific look of small sensors to get what they want. The older Ricoh GRD cameras were well known for that. I've seen Pentax Q owners say something similar. I've asked myself why MFT doesn't seem to carry that same look and feel. I think it comes down to being an in-between: you can get some shallow DoF, especially with the large aperture "pro" lenses. You can get good detail and just a bit of 3D-ness. But it'll never be identical to the output of a larger sensor. Just as it's not identical to the "2D-ness" of small sensor cameras. Every format has a character imprinted on it which you can't totally erase.
 
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I came across a couple documentaries, one about Daido Moriyama and one about Miyako Ishiuchi. While watching the videos I noticed both of these are shooting street photography with what seem like small point and shoot cameras.

Here are the videos, btw:



I guess my insecurity is such that I find it somewhat comforting to see renown artists using point and shoot cameras for (at least some of) their work. Or maybe I need the occasional reminder that sensor size isn't everything, and that art depends on a whole lot more than having a fancy camera. Not that I'm an artist! :biggrin:

Also this helps talk me off the ledge of buying needing wanting a medium format camera... :biggrin:
My own choices are informed by many artists, and my own judgement.

When I can create something like this, I might start to feel limited by the gear I have. Until then, I consider myself to be my only limitation.

http://www.david-hockney.org/pearblossom-highway/

https://www.getty.edu/art/collectio...1-18th-april-1986-2-british-april-11-18-1986/

TL : DR - No. Imagination and doing spur creativity, not hardware.
 

Darmok N Jalad

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I keep going back to the notion that you got to be willing to take it with you in order to be creative with it. I’ve lost count of the number of moments where I wish I had a camera. Those moments are now just rusty still shots in my aging brain.🤪
 

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