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Do all m4/3 cameras go black in between shots?

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Johnny1.33, Jun 7, 2011.

  1. Johnny1.33

    Johnny1.33 Mu-43 Regular

    113
    Jun 4, 2011
    I think that is the most annoying part and reminds me of point and shoot. You take the shot and the screen goes blank, wait, comes back. Do they all do that? Maybe if it were a very short blackout it'd be better.
     
  2. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    As far as I know, yes. When the image is captured, the screen goes black while the processor is reading the sensor. In a traditional SLR, when the processor is reading the sensor, the user still has use of the OVF to follow a shot.

    The only way I could see for live view to work without blacking out is to decouple the EVF/LCD from the main sensor. This would require another sensor of some sorts with a mirror or some way to re-direct the image to the EVF sensor while the main sensor is being read. I would imagine such a system would introduce shutter lag or other issues.
     
  3. antithetic

    antithetic Mu-43 Regular

    150
    Jun 7, 2010
    City of Angels
    DSLRs also experience viewfinder blackout than the EVF but the it's the slight delay of the EVF in reflecting what's in front of you that makes tracking hard for me.
     
  4. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    The Olympus E-330 (Four-Thirds DSLR) had a separate "Live View" sensor which was just for live view. Seemed to work fine... a lot of people loved that camera, though I haven't had the pleasure. It wasn't "traditional" enough though, so the E-500 took over.
     
  5. Johnny1.33

    Johnny1.33 Mu-43 Regular

    113
    Jun 4, 2011
    I'm just trying to see how I could live without an optical viewfinder.
     
  6. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    I'm not familiar with that camera. Doesn't sony use a small sensor for "Live View" in its Alpha dSLRs?
     
  7. chuckgoolsbee

    chuckgoolsbee Mu-43 Regular

    144
    Apr 6, 2010
    Bend, Oregon
    To compensate I find myself looking down the barrel of the lens through the G1's hot shoe like sighting a gun when shooting moving objects. A compromise for sure but I seem to get better results that way.
     
  8. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    sorry... but wrong... by its fundamental design a single lens reflex camera, digital or otherwise will block off the viewfinder as it exposes the film/sensor.

    Rangefinder cameras like the Leica separate the viewfinder from the image the sensor receives... which has good point ...like no black out... but laso bad point like you don't actually see what you get in terms of framing and DOF... even on slrs you don't actually see the same DOF as the final recorded image.

    As far as i understand all digital cameras still have a mechanical shutter... so when you press the shutter the camera has to close the shutter, clear the sensor, fire the shutter, read the sensor and then return either the mirror or restart the live view...hence the blackout and the noticeable lag

    K
     
  9. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Yes, I don't know all which Sony models feature this, but Sony did introduce a similar two-sensor system with a small Live View sensor on their A550 in December of 2009. Of course, Olympus had this long before Sony, but the idea is the same.

    It provides fast PDAF autofocus with Live View. Here's Sony's schematic:
    [​IMG]
    And here's Olympus' version which was made 3 1/2 years earlier in March 2006:
    [​IMG]

    Sony also has a couple pellicle mirror models, the "SLT" series (Single Lens Translucent). The pellicle mirror never flips up, but rather lets most of the light through to the sensor while diverting some to the PDAF sensor. This allows for fast PDAF focus to be used in Live View (as opposed to slower CDAF), and also allows very fast burst rates of up to 10 fps - with no blackout (to put us right on topic of the thread!).

    However the mirror is eating up a full 1/3 stop of light from the lens... this requires 1/3 EV higher sensitivities or slower shutter speeds to obtain the same exposure, and requires the view in the viewfinder to be electronically enhanced to stay bright. The original Canon Pellix from the 60's only had the choice of an Optical Viewfinder, so the view in the viewfinder was dim because of the pellicle mirror. By using an EVF instead, Sony is also able to reduce the size and weight of their cameras over an SLR, without giving up PDAF focus.

    Personally, I'd rather live with the blackout and get the maximum resolution and light from my lens, especially through the weak AA filter featured on the Olympus E-5 and E-PL2. :) Options like the Pellicle mirror eat up way too much of my precious image quality, just for slightly faster AF and faster continuous burst rates. I think we're too stuck on features and automation, and forgetting what our cameras are made to do - take photos. I'd rather manually focus all my lenses than to to be so dependent on AF.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. The viewfinder blackout in a traditional SLR still seems a lot quicker than on an LCD or EVF.
     
  11. shoturtle

    shoturtle  

    823
    Oct 15, 2010
    yes the refresh rate of the evf are not fast enough to prevent it form going black. Even the sony slt do not give you live data. They seem not to go black but they are actually projecting a image that is 1/10 of a sec early. So you are not seeing the live event but the photo of what it captured.