Do 1st generation Pannies have tendency to blow light-deflecting skin?

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by New Daddy, Jun 9, 2012.

  1. New Daddy

    New Daddy Mu-43 Regular

    Jan 24, 2011
    I get quite a few photos from my GF1 and GH1 in which the subject's skin is blown (most often the arms) due to light deflection on a bright day. It happens quite often so I always knock down 1/3 stop on auto exposure, but still can't always escape it.

    Is this a known trait of the first generation Pannies? Is there a quick remedy for this short of knocking down another 1/3 stop? Does polarizing filter help?

    Also, can you make highlight warning available before the fact in the first generation Pannies? I can only see blown highlight in playback, but it's too late by then in some occasions.
  2. ckrueger

    ckrueger Mu-43 Veteran

    Jul 16, 2011
    I found my GH1 (and EP1, actually) tend to expose a bit brighter than my Canon and Olympus DSLRs by about a third stop. I shoot with negative EC more often with the GH1 and EP1 to counter it.

    Compounding my difficulty getting used to this trait was the fact that Lightroom had a hard time recovering blown highlights for any M43 cameras for a while. It seems to have gotten better in recent versions, and also my EM5 seems to have more RAW headroom, so the problem has lessened for me of late.
  3. Eutexian

    Eutexian New to Mu-43

    Feb 9, 2012
    I don't get this - maybe I'm misunderstanding your post/question.But seems to me you're describing something that can happen with just about any camera and that has been addressed since time immemorial by the simple addition of a PL filter.
  4. JJJPhoto

    JJJPhoto Mu-43 Veteran

    Jul 8, 2011
    Cincinnati, OH
    Real Name:
    Jerry Jackson Jr
    It does sound like basic highlight clipping. If you don't want to use a filter you can always shoot RAW and use the highlight recovery tool in ACR ... that often works for highlights on skin if the skin is just slightly blown out.
  5. New Daddy

    New Daddy Mu-43 Regular

    Jan 24, 2011
    Well, the subject usually is in the center area, if not the dead center. I would have thought the camera's automatic exposure would try to prevent highlight clipping in the center area when it's on center-weighted metering.

    So, other systems would behave this way too?