Delveoping fim (digitally)?

Discussion in 'Other Systems' started by crashwins, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. crashwins

    crashwins Mu-43 Regular

    132
    Oct 13, 2010
    Northampton, MA
    Hey folks. I have some very nice film cameras (inherited) and I'd like to give them a sincere whirl. I'm not looking to go the darkroom route, though. What's the best way to go about getting digital copies of the images? I assume I could get scans that would be the equivalent of ~20MPs in resolution, but to sure of the cost and where to start. Anyway, thanks for any suggestions.
     
  2. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Promit Roy
    Not Costco, in my experience. Or pretty much anywhere else that is part of a chain. You need to hunt down a competent film lab doing serious developing work and serious scanning, which is going to be rare and pricey (~$9 per roll of 24).
     
  3. crashwins

    crashwins Mu-43 Regular

    132
    Oct 13, 2010
    Northampton, MA
    Wow! That's pricey. Maybe I would save if I got them developed at a shop, but had a $500 printer or something to do the scans. Used ones seem to be out there, no? Thanks for the help
     
  4. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    623
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    Doing your own scans is rather labor intensive.

    There are a few affordable decent scanners. The Epson v700 and v750m are probably the best. Their Epson Perfection V600 Photo Scanner - Product Information - Epson America, Inc. is a decent alternative. Personally, I use a v700 at home though at work I use an Imagon scanner. The Imagons are the best available, but cost as much as a new car making them beyond consideration for home use.

    You'll need to pair the scanner with a decent image editor, of course. You'll find that you need to do additional color and density adjustments above and beyound the adjustments you can do in the scanning utilities. You'll also need to retouch the dust and other small flaws that always occur. None of the automatic dust removal functions in any scanner can be relied on all the time. They often can work well, as they do with the Epson's, but also often fail disasterously. Plan on doing most of the dust remove manually.
     
  5. crashwins

    crashwins Mu-43 Regular

    132
    Oct 13, 2010
    Northampton, MA
    Thanks so much for the help! So, basically: I take my photos, have the negatives developed at a local shop, and then use my own scanner to capture the negatives, correct? I've long been a digital guy, but I do a lot of street photography and am intrigued by the amazing results I'm seeing of low-cost film cameras like my Auto S3.
     
  6. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    +1 for the Epsons.
    All my scanned film shots were done on my Epson v500 - about a $150 dollar scanner :smile:

    6179879346_2a7be6c7c3_b.
    USAF Military Training Instructor (MTI) by RedTail_Panther, on Flickr
     
  7. twalker294

    twalker294 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    543
    Aug 18, 2010

    There's still just "something" about film that digital can't recreate. Very nice.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. crashwins

    crashwins Mu-43 Regular

    132
    Oct 13, 2010
    Northampton, MA
    Very newbie question, but it is necessary to develop the negatives before using a dedicated scanner, correct?
     
  9. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Correct. I usually get mine developed at Walgreens but I do have a lab in town which I sometimes use also. (Just a longer drive which is why I use Walgreens most often)
     
  10. crashwins

    crashwins Mu-43 Regular

    132
    Oct 13, 2010
    Northampton, MA
    Great. Thanks. How much is the developing? Any good?
     
  11. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Many Epson flatbed scanners come with an attachment for scanning film and slides. It's not as good as a drum scanner of course, but it works. Other than that you can of course develop then scan but that costs more money (not saying that buying a new scanner won't cost a lot of money of course, lol! That's a one-time investment). Just how often do you plan on doing this?
     
  12. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Developing is good for my requirements.
    Local lab charges under $3 USD and Walgreens just under $6 USD to develop 36 frame roll of C41 film...
     
  13. martinq

    martinq Mu-43 Rookie

    24
    Sep 2, 2011
    San Jose, CA
    I used to do film scanning with a borrowed Nikon Coolscan V, and it was pretty slow and laborious. I couldn't afford to purchase one of those so I ended up buying a Canon MP970 multifunction printer that had a film adapter. It doesn't scan as quickly, has a fiddly film holder that doesn't hold the film perfectly flat, and the scanning element can't adjust focus. All told a flatbed won't be as good as a dedicated film scanner, but you can still get terrific results especially with the nicer models like the V500 and V700 that the others have mentioned.

    I thought that I'd be scanning quite a bit, but it was so time-consuming and my keeper rate so low that I decided to stick with digital.

    If all that hasn't dissuaded you, here's what I'd recommend: go ahead and get your film developed at Costco or some other quick minilab and have them make you a CD. The scans they make aren't always the best quality, often too much contrast and not very high resolution, but they're usually good enough to post at web resolution. Get an Epson V500 or V600 scanner and use it to scan only the images that are worth spending time on. For me, this was maybe 1 or 2 frames out of a roll of 24 exposures. That way you get both the convenience of drugstore developing and the quality potential of a really good scan for images that deserve it.
     
  14. martinq

    martinq Mu-43 Rookie

    24
    Sep 2, 2011
    San Jose, CA
    A couple of examples

    These are web resolution only, but maybe they'll give you some idea of what's possible with minilab and flatbed scanners. There's a great deal of variation with minilabs, some of them produce nice scans, some of them not so much, so shop around.

    Minilab, Noritsu S2:
    4605212269_a63f0760e9_z.
    Sunset by martin_q, on Flickr

    Minilab, Noritsu Koki QSS-32_33
    4795993270_118c392d86_b.
    Santa Clara at Second by martin_q, on Flickr

    Canon MP970
    4795996234_a6be1c83d2_b.
    Cathedral Basilica of Saint Joseph by martin_q, on Flickr
     
  15. supermaxv

    supermaxv Mu-43 Veteran

    273
    Sep 20, 2011
    I take my rolls to the local photo lab to get my 35mm and 120 developed and scanned. For 35mm, it comes out to around 15 bucks for color, slightly more for B&W, but they do a superb job with the development and scans. It's pricey, but it's not more expensive than other photo labs in seattle, and I think of it as paying to not having to deal with the effort of scanning at home.
     
  16. Haans

    Haans Mu-43 Regular

    136
    Feb 18, 2012
    I pay 10 bucks at a lab for development. I get better scans out of my Nikon V for 35mm, but also have a V-700 for medium and large format.
     
  17. MikeR_GF1

    MikeR_GF1 Mu-43 Veteran

    This guy has a nice description of what he does, the lab he uses (he's in Philly, the lab on the West coast), and when to use a scanner.

    Shutterfinger: My New Darkroom

    All sorts of good suggestions here on scanning, but it IS labor intensive, so getting some medium res scans from the lab that does your developing is a good way to review what you have, and pick the winners to work on yourself.

    $10 a roll seems like a fair price these days. $4 a sheet for 4x5.