Defish & Panini Project Rokinon Resolution?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by MAubrey, Jan 27, 2013.

  1. MAubrey

    MAubrey Photographer

    Jul 9, 2012
    Bellingham, WA
    Mike Aubrey
    I've enjoyed the Olympus 9-18mm on my OM-D. I've thought about the 7-14mm a few times, but the range of the Oly is so enjoyable that I've held back on the 7-14mm. But I'm still so very interested in the wider AOV for landscape.

    I know that the Rokinon/Samyang is very sharp, but how do the corners and edges hold up after defishing changing to Panini projection? I'm not particularly interested in the fisheye look (though it does have its place). If the non-fisheye resolution is good enough, I'd seriously consider adding it to my arsenal.

    Thoughts? Suggestions? Opinions?
     
  2. RevBob

    RevBob Super Moderator

    Jun 4, 2011
    NorthWestern PA
    Bob
    I have a Rokinon and it's a nice little lens. It does suffer a bit on the edges when defished, but it's still acceptable for me. It's not as good as a dedicated UWA, but I've gotten some great shots with mine. :cool:
     
  3. MAubrey

    MAubrey Photographer

    Jul 9, 2012
    Bellingham, WA
    Mike Aubrey
    Hmmm. I'm guessing then that it would be pretty obvious in a large print. That's unfortunate. I suppose I'll just have to keep waiting for a better alternative.
     
  4. ultimind

    ultimind Mu-43 Rookie

    13
    Jan 17, 2013
    Ohio
    If I'm making a large wide angle print, I will often shoot 3-4 shots in vertical orientation with a wide lens (Fisheye or rectilinear) and use something like Autopano Pro or PTGui to stitch them into one shot. You can often yield final images that are 30-60 Megapixel in resolution. And these 3-4 shot pans can be snapped in a matter of seconds.
     
  5. MAubrey

    MAubrey Photographer

    Jul 9, 2012
    Bellingham, WA
    Mike Aubrey
    Well, that's what I'm already doing with the 9-18mm when I want to go beyond 9mm, but I'd rather compose through the lens than through the computer screen...which is what happens with stitching generally.

    What I really want is a 7mm f/2.8 to go along side the 9-18mm f/4-5.6.
     
  6. ultimind

    ultimind Mu-43 Rookie

    13
    Jan 17, 2013
    Ohio
    I know what you mean by composing through the computer... I've had instances where I was sure I'd composed something one way, and after stitching it just doesn't come out like I had hoped.

    Sigma makes the absolutely outstanding (although not fast) 8-16mm f/4.5-5.6 for DX and 12-24mm for FX cameras. So they definitely have the technical knowhow to make ultra wide, low distortion lenses. I think once we start seeing Sigma ART lenses for m4/3 we may get some veeerrrry interesting wide lenses.
     
  7. MAubrey

    MAubrey Photographer

    Jul 9, 2012
    Bellingham, WA
    Mike Aubrey
    That would be excellent.

    A μ43 equivalent to that Canon TS-E 17mm f/4 wouldn't to bad either...
     
  8. ultimind

    ultimind Mu-43 Rookie

    13
    Jan 17, 2013
    Ohio
    Tilt shift lenses are definitely at the higher end of high end professional lenses. Both in terms of difficulty of use and image quality (when used correctly). I think until we see some seriously professional m4/3 gear you can probably count on there not being any sort of tilt shift lenses except maybe from someone like Rokinon. (Those guys are crazy...crazy awesome, that is)

    I predict we get something to the tune of a 6-12mm rectilinear zoom in the next 12 months. I really hope Tokina brings their superior build quality to the m4/3 party...and soon. Although if the only lens I was left with was the 45 1.8, I'd be a pretty happy camper. The rest of my needs are catered to with my Nikon gear.
     
  9. MAubrey

    MAubrey Photographer

    Jul 9, 2012
    Bellingham, WA
    Mike Aubrey
    Indeed, the third party manufacturers really need to step up their game. Hopefully, the new zoom from Tamron is a hint at more to come.
     
  10. ultimind

    ultimind Mu-43 Rookie

    13
    Jan 17, 2013
    Ohio
    It kind of sucks that Tamron is testing the waters with a consumer grade zoom. I feel bad for folks that don't really know what they're looking for... Seeing a dozen or more VERY similar options when shopping for a lens must be frustrating and confusing.

    Someone walks in to a camera shop looking for a consumer-grade Nikon DSLR... They want a zoom lens to go with it. They have the following options presented to them: 18-55VR, 16-85VR, 18-105VR, 18-135, 18-200VR, 18-300VR. And those are just the Nikon branded lenses. Then you've got the Sigma 17-70, 18-50, 18-125, 18-200, and 18-250. Tamron 18-200, 18-270, and 28-300.

    That's 14 (and probably a few I left out) consumer-grade zoom lenses that one could potentially come across at a camera shop.

    Thankfully there's far fewer choices in Micro Four Thirds. But it would be nice to see more high end offerings from 3rd parties.