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Day And Night (Figuratively Speaking)

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by UkrainianOne, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. UkrainianOne

    UkrainianOne Mu-43 Regular

    168
    Jul 29, 2011
    Long Island, New York
    So, some of you guys know me by now and all of my adapted lenses... Today i decided to bring my camera outside my castle walls again to the local county park, and boy i couldnt of made a better decision! I kinda beat myself up on the fact that the photo-shoot i did for my friends band didnt come up with the sharpness i was hoping to get out of my 50mm Pentacon.

    Anyway, for some reason today, i was able to squeeze out every bit of sharpness out of all of the following lenses :

    (Broken) Pentacon 50mm f1.8 ( Now with UV filter )



    Then Switched up to my 28mm f2.8 Soligor ( now with UV filter and petal hood )
    2lmowes.
    2wfiqty.
    wtc20m.


    Then used my Soligor 28-90 mm f3.5-4.5 (*and figured out it was a zoom lens by accidently pulling the focus ring away from me lol*)
    2i7qpzt.

    Same lens just macro
    20z8j8l.

    Then My Russian Industar 50mm f3.5 and was amazed on what kind of sharpness i was able to pull out of it

    anylg5.
    I guess snapple is really made from the best stuff on earth!



    And finally, MY CAR!:rofl:
    152mjqv.


    I didnt change anything except the film mode to Nature, ISO AUTO, WB AUTO, played around with the metering mostly used ( ) and + for the swan. The sun was permeating through the pines at around 4:30pm - 5:30pm and was at my back most of the time. So im still trying to figure out, what gives??? How come on every other day my shots come out fuzzy, but a ride into the woods and boom great photos!
     
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  2. avidone

    avidone Mu-43 Top Veteran

    520
    Jun 24, 2011
    Rome, Italy
    I have also been pleasantly surprised by my industar 50-2, and keep meaning to get out and use it more... the problem is that my lens addiction puts it down the list from too many others. If I recall, the industar 50 is meant to be a Tessar derivative. And many people say good things about its performance despite its "toy lens" look. I was lucky to find mine, a bit dirty but unharmed, attached to a set of three extension tubes, for 10 euro at the flea market.
     
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  3. Thanks for posting such a nice variety of images. I'm glad to see that you're getting to grips with manually focusing your adapted lenses.
     
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  4. UkrainianOne

    UkrainianOne Mu-43 Regular

    168
    Jul 29, 2011
    Long Island, New York
    I picked mine off of Ebay for 30 bucks withs shipping, the outside of it is a little worn out, but the optics are just fine :smile: After getting the hang of this little guy, i now understand what they mean when they say a lens has a "warm" look. I can get nice sharpness out of it but it is very difficult to focus for me at times becuae every hair pin turn makes a difference so a extreme steady hand is a must.
     
  5. UkrainianOne

    UkrainianOne Mu-43 Regular

    168
    Jul 29, 2011
    Long Island, New York
    Thank you Lucky! Ive come to realize one thing since about adapted lenses, they could be your friend or your enemy depending on what I am shooting. The Sun direction and strength being the biggest enemy becuase it can make all my images "fuzzy" specially if I am shooting something white or light in color. Also someone once told me on here to get to know my lenses, this is extremely true for me, if i dont know which one of my lenses to use during a specific situation, then all my photos will be out of focus. That being said, i am proud to be using MF lenses at my age where everyone else is using AF glass and taking full credit for thier photos. :tongue:
     
  6. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    This is the 2nd thread where you've mentioned autofocus as if it's some huge crutch; focusing the lens determines whether you are actually a photographer or some monkey that pressed the button. It's really nice that you're enthusiastic about your newfound hobby. However, at the end of the day, what makes you a good photographer or not is if you make a good photo, or at least one that you're proud of. Don't interject these arbitrary standards for deciding what makes a photographer. You are no more a photographer than anyone else on this site because of your lens choice. The best photographers in the world use autofocus. Heck, the arguably most famous photographer of all time, Ansel Adams, was a gearhead. If he were alive today, he'd have the latest camera with the coolest exposure meter, tons of autofocus points, etc. William Eggleston, Annie Liebovitz, etc. They all have been seen with autofocus cameras in their hands.

    Honestly, from your posts it looks like you are unable/unwilling to invest in a Panasonic or Olympus lens, and you've talked yourself into believing that you're somehow acting more nobly than someone who just bought something like an m.Zuiko 14-42. This couldn't be further from the truth. The great thing about a kit is that it allows the new photographer to focus on the important aspects of photography: framing, the creative eye, etc. while allowing technology to take care of the technical aspects. Slowly, these new users can take control of settings once they understand the limitations of automation, and the effects that the camera's choices are having on their photos.

    I said it in the previous thread and I'll say it again: those lenses look like dogs. A camera is only as good as the image you project onto the sensor/film plane. You can buy cheap without sacrificing quality. Since you have a Minolta MD mount, look on ebay for anything by Minolta, Tamron, Tokina, Vivitar, etc. Pick up a fixed lens between 20mm and 28mm. Get yourself something that will do your camera sensor justice. Also, slow down. Focusing correctly is secondary. Most importantly, carefully frame your shot. Be aware of what shutter speed you're using. If you REALLY want good practice, go to a thrift shop, Goodwill, Salvation Army, etc. and buy yourself a film camera. A small $2-$5 point and shoot with a fixed lens. Yashica, Canon, Olympus, Minolta; they're all good. Start using that as your camera. It will make you a better photographer, and honestly, it will give you 10-15 times better pictures than what you're getting now.
     
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  7. UkrainianOne

    UkrainianOne Mu-43 Regular

    168
    Jul 29, 2011
    Long Island, New York
    :thumbup:
    Ive been using a P&S for 4 years, this year i upgraded to a G1... Artistic value is more important at the end of the day than any sharpness your 700.00 dollar AF lens can achieve, and as far as a film cameras are concerned, id burn those faster than a yule log during christmas. Its a shame you do not see the potential here. How much of it is really the lens? or the value of them. At one point in time all lenses cost a pretty penny. Now you bad mouthing old glass is like kicking your grandmother when she has cancer, you just dont do that, becuase these lenses, no matter what your opinion is of them, have been through as many years as you if not more, still function, maybe not as much as you, and in the right momment will take better photographs than any AF lens on the market. Heres what i see, people go out and buy a AF lens, shoot it in B&W or other modes on thier camera, then take it and edit and touch it up ( post-proccessing ) and then take credit for a photograph that was not taken by them becuase it is no longer the image that the camera captured on its sensor. I will make it my goal, in my region, to discourage this as much as possible, and as soon as the dinosaurs reach thier graveyard, i will make it my point to teach the future generations to stray away from such non-sense. Photography is the art of using your camera to capture an image, not the art of buying a robot lens and letting it capture the image for you and deffinatly not using photoshop or light room and turning an image into something its not. You need to learn how to crawl before you learn how to walk, and using an AF lens is the equivelent of learning how to crawl and then flying a boeing 747. Before you come out firing like some sort of a noob out of an Apple store, go research what art is.
     
  8. Iconindustries

    Iconindustries Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Okay mate you sound a bit upset. I kinda get your drift but I do encourage you to listen to others as well. Have an open mind and you'll be amazed at what you will learn and pick up. It might feel like you are being put down but In the end you will be amazed how far you will grow and get better by just picking up little bits on the way. Not that long ago a member here called Jambajoe showed his first model pictures. Now he was just starting out and had many comments on his images. Not many were particulary (nice) as you would put it, but guess what! He put the things that people said/ or suggested into practice and now months on he is amazingly brilliant. He listened to other seasoned photographers and now he really can go somewhere.

    Old lenses are great, no doubt about that. But i can't see the metaphor between your old grandma and old lenses, and yet you would burn your film camera? That was the same camera that had the old lens on the front.
    I love my MF Rokkors and I also love my AF Panny 20mm. For the same reason you now shoot with a Digital is the same reason I shoot with AF. You've upgraded to a digital so the upgrade to a AF lens isn't that much different. And besides AF was around way before digital.

    So I not trying to put you down but trying to get you to see that the stigma with AF lenses is not bad. I'm not good enough with MF lenses yet to take photos of kids playing because i can't focus quick enough. But with AF I can capture them if they're running around ect.

    I love post processing, it's my hobby. I believe it makes an ordinary photo into something more eye catching. I definitely don't have it all together yet but by looking at others pictures and listening, i continue to keep learning.

    I saw this picture this morning and enjoy it. Has it been post processed? Of course it has, but it's the same person, the same composition that Mr. Woosra composed. But it caught my eye, and that is the whole idea.

    500px / Photo "Innocence" by Woosra Kim


    I encourage you to keep learning and by keeping your eyes and ears open you will continue to get better and better. Most of all have fun.:smile:


    Take care,
    best

    icon
     
    • Like Like x 3
  9. DekHog

    DekHog Mu-43 Top Veteran

    579
    May 3, 2011
    Scotland
    Sorry, but those images are really soft, lacking in contrast and a few not properly focussed (or your lenses are worse than what I think they are); if that's dragging every last bit of sharpness out of your lenses, you need to sell them and get a kit zoom.... it'll give you 10x the image quality with half the effort.
     
  10. phrenic

    phrenic Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 13, 2010
    Huh? Robot lens? There's nothing wrong with using old glass but I don't understand the hatred towards modern lens. Perhaps a lens with electronics kicked your grandmother?

    LOL @ the Apple store reference...perhaps you grind your own glass using hand carved stone tools? Fact of the matter is that lots of things have electronics and new technology in them. And it's not a big deal.

    Auto-focus doesn't make art..but using old (not particularly sharp) lenses doesn't automatically make a picture art either.
     
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  11. UkrainianOne

    UkrainianOne Mu-43 Regular

    168
    Jul 29, 2011
    Long Island, New York
    Im making my own glass out of repressed youth tears that have been baked in an oven and ground with the stone of dispair, finally smoothing it out to a nice piece of convex lens using remorse.
     
  12. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    OK, let's break this down. I have over 15 years of photography experience. I love this hobby more than you; I promise you. It easily affects every aspect of my life. All of my friends know me as "the photographer." I have a formal education in it. It used to be my profession; I worked as a photojournalist through college. I've shot cameras ranging from a cardboard box with a piece of film in it to a multi-thousand dollar camera with all the latest gadgetries. Don't tell me that I have some kind of preconceived notion against old lenses. Look at my signature. My oldest camera predates your grandfather, and I love using it. And, I'm telling you that your argument against autofocus lenses MAKES NO SENSE to anyone with the SLIGHTEST knowledge about photography.

    What artistic value do you believe your photos have over any other photo on this site? Seriously, link to ANY photo on this site that you think is less artistic than yours. I promise that you won't find one. Your crusade against autofocus is really perplexing. Where did you get this idea that autofocus sucks? How can you be raving against a "robot lens" when you're using a robot camera? So the lens doing the focusing for you is wrong, but the camera doing the exposure and developing of the image for you is not only okay, but preferred to an older film camera? How does that make ANY sense? You brag about (poorly) focusing and framing the photo, but what about all the Panasonic circuitry and processors that turns that projected image into a photograph? You want credit for not using technology? Don't use a digital camera. Get yourself an old Russian rangefinder camera with no autofocus, no meter, no sensor, nothing. Load the film yourself, frame the photo yourself, focus the photo yourself, choose the exposure yourself, unload the film yourself, develop the film yourself, and print the picture yourself. THEN, come back and MAYBE we can start to discuss automation in photography. Until then, take your robot Panasonic camera, sit down, shut up, and listen when someone with lifetimes more photography experience than you tells you something.

    Have you ever heard the phrase, "The poor man buys twice?" You're wasting money on all of this low-end CRAP, and then you're going to have to go out once you've realized the mistake you made, and you're going to have to buy decent lenses. Also, who says that just because we have autofocus lenses, that we didn't turn the autofocus dial to MF? How about buying a $150 kit lens off of the Buy and Sell forum, just because it doesn't SUCK, contrast-wise and sharpness-wise?
     
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  13. UkrainianOne

    UkrainianOne Mu-43 Regular

    168
    Jul 29, 2011
    Long Island, New York
    Clearly your knowledge sucks becuase your not sharing it and shooting mine down. You expect future generation to learn from the kind of crap your spewing out? You wanna talk about what skill and background you have thats fine, but if you take it to your grave and your about as useless as the gum on my shoe. I have also taken Jounalism coarses in college, among other things, Wanna talk old cameras? ok:

    ilejcl.

    And my camera is not a robot, its powered by souls of old people who talk crap about other people's lenses and skills.
     
  14. Okay, this thread is getting a bit out of hand.

    Ukrainianone, in your first post you mentioned that you were disappointed with the shots of your friend's band, but you've shown here that you've learnt from that experience and have utilised your equipment better this time around. Having come from a P&S to a m4/3 camera with manual lenses you are on a steep learning curve, but I think you are on the right track. As you continue to improve you will start to ask more of your equipment, and it may well be that you will look for some different lenses, but if you are happy with what you have now then that is what matters.

    Having said that, autofocus is a very useful tool to have and is no less of a crutch than any other automated feature on our modern cameras. The other advantage of AF lenses is that they are also much newer, and benefit from the latest technology in optics, surface coatings, manufacturing tolerances, etc, and in the case of m4/3 lenses are specifically designed for the sensors in our m4/3 cameras. Using a native m4/3 lens will also give a good frame of reference by which to judge your adapted lenses, and will show you if you are getting the best out of the camera with the lenses you already have. As much fun as it is to use older adapted lenses, there is no need to dismiss the use of autofocus. It is much the same as a film shooter dismissing the use of live view and other modern conveniences on a digital camera such as your G1.

    So please, everyone keep the comments constructive and let's try to remain civil to one another.
     
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  15. UkrainianOne

    UkrainianOne Mu-43 Regular

    168
    Jul 29, 2011
    Long Island, New York
    Point Taken, I just wont respond to him anymore, and keep it truckin, Luckypenguin thanks for keepin things in focus :biggrin:
     
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