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Dark Daisy lens

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by Bangonthedoortwice, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. Bangonthedoortwice

    Bangonthedoortwice Mu-43 Regular

    80
    Oct 14, 2012
    Merseyside
    Can anyone direct me to where I can purchase this lens? I've looked on ebay/Amazon/Google, the usual suspects but with no joy. The pic attached is from the Dark Daisy Lens.
     
  2. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    I'm intrigued by your image. This post is the first I've heard of this lens and a quick Google search proved fruitless in turning up any info.

    What is a "Dark Daisy lens" and where did this image come from?
     
  3. AceAceBaby

    AceAceBaby Mu-43 Veteran

    249
    Jan 21, 2013
  4. Bangonthedoortwice

    Bangonthedoortwice Mu-43 Regular

    80
    Oct 14, 2012
    Merseyside
    I was intrigued too, it's fabulous though don't you think? For a toy lens too! It just goes to show, we really can be fooled by 'new cameras' give better images, this is possibly 5-6 years old. It is from a S5 fan page and it just reads "Dark Daisy minor PP on S5" and i can't find anything :frown:
     
  5. Julius

    Julius Mu-43 Regular

    63
    Aug 28, 2011
    Italy
    Giulio
  6. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    That is not a lens called Dark Daisy. That's the kid's name (see "Frank and Daisy" on the lower right). It's probably just a standard lens with post production skills.

    You need to delete these photos from this site, and replace it with a link and attribution. You are currently violating copyright laws. The license on the flickr page clearly states copyright, with rights reserved.
     
  7. Julius

    Julius Mu-43 Regular

    63
    Aug 28, 2011
    Italy
    Giulio
    How to use the Web improperly.
     
  8. Bangonthedoortwice

    Bangonthedoortwice Mu-43 Regular

    80
    Oct 14, 2012
    Merseyside
    I got it from the Fuji fanpage from facebook and i was using it as an example, i am completely unaware i am breaking any rules.
     
  9. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Np. Everyone makes mistakes. Just remember to link, and not download.
     
  10. Livnius

    Livnius Super Moderator

    Jul 7, 2011
    Melbourne. Australia
    Joe
    For future reference, if you want to use an image from the web that isn't yours, it's best practice to provide a link to the original and clearly note appropriate credit.

    eg. Here's a photo I found, by John Smith on Flickr [link].

    Just to eliminate any potential issues arising, however unlikely that may be.
     
  11. Bangonthedoortwice

    Bangonthedoortwice Mu-43 Regular

    80
    Oct 14, 2012
    Merseyside
    Okay, awesome. Thanks for explaining it nicely. Its funny you mention copyrite. Does anyone know if you can copyright composition? because I put some work up and a few days ago on flickr and posted it in the local newspaper group... days later some other guy has completely copied my picture! Not as good but just my idea, my framing, exact location etc He even had the cheek to like, favourite and comment on my work and then do his own days later and recieves credit lol. Creative copyright? Just for future reference really, does it exist?
     
  12. RnR

    RnR Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    Hasse
    It would be like copywriting novels involving detectives.
     
  13. savvy

    savvy Mu-43 Top Veteran

    714
    Sep 28, 2012
    SE Essex, UK
    Les
    No you can't, I had exactly the same happen to me, it looked like a carbon copy of my image that he had shot (but not quite as well PP'd :biggrin: ).

    A building is a building, a tree is a tree, a landscape is a landscape, anyone can photograph them if they are public.

    Just take it as a form of flattery that they copied you.
     
  14. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    A person can even take your image and change it and then it is his! I think it has to be 20% different or something like that. You also can't copyright titles of works of art.
     
  15. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Is this true???? Doesn't seem right at all!
     
  16. Bangonthedoortwice

    Bangonthedoortwice Mu-43 Regular

    80
    Oct 14, 2012
    Merseyside
    Funnily enough, i titled some work as 'Snowfall' and 'Snowfall in Spring' as in my town we had a fair bit of snow in March! So with the James Bond 'skyfall' being current still, i thought it'd be good to adapt it to Snowfall as a eye catcher. Then, few days later, similar shot, same title, better tags, more credit. :horse: i want to do > :fantastisch_01:
     
  17. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Copyright law differs in various countries. I personally think that judge was wrong in this case! Although there is similarity I don't see it as being similar enough for copyright infringement. Now since it is about two companies using it for advertising/sales/logo that should fall under trademark law not copyright. I am confused by this one!
     
  18. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer


    OK, after looking into it I was wrong. The 10% or 20% difference rule is a myth. So you can't legally take someone else's work and make a few changes and then it is yours. There are what is called "Fair Use" rules which allow the use of all or part of copyrighted works for criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. That percentage myth came out of this although in the actual laws there is no percentage stated.

    For more info on US copyright law click here - U.S. Copyright Office

    However since this copyright debate started over a picture that was shared on this forum from another source, I personally think that would fall under the fair use rules. The picture was used for comment, criticism and possibly teaching. However giving credit to the owner is a good idea and it is best and most legal to get permission from the owner first.