1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

Couple of pics with big difference in colour

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by Phil66, Apr 2, 2012.

  1. Phil66

    Phil66 Mu-43 Regular

    130
    Dec 27, 2011
    Hello,
    Can you please explain why these are so different for one stop difference.

    G3, kit lens, f11, 1/200, A priority, iso 160, 14mm
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/76155724@N07/6893621988/" title="P1010417 by PhilDY6, on Flickr"> 6893621988_9992bd9935. "500" height="334" alt="P1010417"></a>

    G3, kit lens, f10, 1/125, A priority, iso 160, 14mm
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/76155724@N07/7039697169/" title="P1010414 by PhilDY6, on Flickr"> 7039697169_91f169cbe4. "500" height="334" alt="P1010414"></a>

    Thanks for your help folks.:thumbup:

    Phil
     
  2. Just Jim

    Just Jim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    941
    Oct 20, 2011
    EV value of scene 1 for settings is about EV 14
    EV value of scene 2 settings is about EV 13

    In my area most bright sunny days meter at 15-16 which would want me using shutter speed of about 500th to 1000th.
     
  3. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    These aren't the same scene, right?
     
  4. LVL8hacker

    LVL8hacker Mu-43 Veteran

    322
    Jan 4, 2012
    Pinehurst, North Carolina
    Larry Anderson
    One shot looks like you were in the shade.
     
  5. Grinch

    Grinch Mu-43 Top Veteran

    813
    Jan 9, 2011
    Canada
    That's what I thought, first photo you were in the shade. This would affect metering wouldn't it?
     
  6. MajorMagee

    MajorMagee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 24, 2011
    Dayton, OH
    You've also changed your shooting angle relative to the sun.
     
  7. LovinTheEP2

    LovinTheEP2 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    619
    Feb 15, 2011
    Toronto
    Not sure what you are trying to prove with those but gotta tip my hat off to you for posting a very very interesting comparison.

    Same cam. Same lens. Same photographer. 1 a very dull image and the other with nice pop. Just goes to show that 99.9% of the time it's the user and not the gear that results in fantastic photos vs. dull lifeless ones.

    That being said.. if you are asking why the difference.. it's pretty obvious.

    Metering due to change in position from Scene 1 (seems you might have been kneeling for that pic and shaded as well) to Scene 2 out in the open chest height.

    Scene 1: 1/3 sky - 2/3 foliage; in shade
    Scene 2: 1/2 sky - 1/2 foliage; sun directly behind; to long a shutter speed with an increase aperature size (From 11 to 10). So too much light in compared to the well exposed Scene 1.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    836
    Feb 29, 2012
    +1

    The sky is bluest 90% from the sun, and shot #1 is closer to that 90% angle. Other than that it looks pretty well like 1 stop or so.
     
  9. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    I don't understand when you overexpose by a stop that the image looks overexposed by a stop. One stop is twice as much light and with the contrast index of digital cameras, it is hardly surprising.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Phil66

    Phil66 Mu-43 Regular

    130
    Dec 27, 2011
    Hello all,
    Thanks for your answers, some of which went over my head. I'm new to photography apart from P&S snapshots.

    What I was trying to understand is why, when I had one point metering switched on and the square on the screen was pointing to the shed, why the pics are so different. I know they aren't the same shot, but similar location/time etc.

    This is where I am struggling because I thought the camera would set everything else correctly if I had aperture priority on and, as I had single point not multi on and aimed for the shed I thought it would be ok.

    Please enlighten me further.

    I have been taking pics in A or S and also taking the same using the iA mode. The iA mode invariably comes out better but if I am only going to use that I might as well go back to a good P&S

    Cheers

    Phil
     
  11. meachp

    meachp Mu-43 Regular

    49
    Nov 16, 2011
    Norton-on-Tees, UK
    The square on the screen is the focus box, not where the exposure is metered from. What exposure mode are you in - multi-point, centre weighted or spot? If you're in spot meter mode then you should have a blue cross in the middle of the focus box. By one point (or single point) do you actually mean pinpoint (which relates to focus) or spot (which relates to exposure)? A one stop increase in exposure actually lets in twice as much light which explains the difference in the two shots.

    Update: If you're in pinpoint mode (for focussing) you'll see a white cross (but no focus box). If in spot mode (for metering) you'll see a blue cross in the middle of the focus box. If in pinpoint AND spot you'll see a blue cross with white tips. Hope this helps.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Just Jim

    Just Jim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    941
    Oct 20, 2011
    you had Av on with spot metering. OK, What you need to do is use exsposure lock after you spot what you want, then recompose your scene with exsposure lock. Otherwise, the spot meter may read off of a highlight when you slightly recompose.

    If you want to get a better handle on your exsposure, look up the zone system, turn your camera to manual on B&W for week and try to shoot a variety of scenes. That kind of practice every once in awile will get you familiar when your Av and Tv values are misdirecting you.
     
  13. Phil66

    Phil66 Mu-43 Regular

    130
    Dec 27, 2011
    Ahh thanks, I'm at work at the mo, I'll look at the camera when I get home this evening. I think I'm getting confused with a couple of things.

    Cheers

    Phil
     
  14. meachp

    meachp Mu-43 Regular

    49
    Nov 16, 2011
    Norton-on-Tees, UK
    Yep, remember being there myself. Keep at it and it'll all click into place.
     
  15. Phil66

    Phil66 Mu-43 Regular

    130
    Dec 27, 2011
    Ok, I was confuddled :confused:

    I had multi metering on and auto focus single. Sorry for any discombobulation :rolleyes:

    So, how can the camera/I get it so wrong?

    Cheers

    Phil
     
  16. LVL8hacker

    LVL8hacker Mu-43 Veteran

    322
    Jan 4, 2012
    Pinehurst, North Carolina
    Larry Anderson
    I wouldn't be so hard on your self..the two pics are just different, not wrong :)
     
  17. Phil66

    Phil66 Mu-43 Regular

    130
    Dec 27, 2011
    I know the content isn't good, I was just experimenting but I get more like the first one than the second :frown:

    I don't want to leave the camera in iA mode as it makes it an expensive and not so user friendly P&S :frown:

    Might be better off with a superzoom bridge.


    Phil
     
  18. LVL8hacker

    LVL8hacker Mu-43 Veteran

    322
    Jan 4, 2012
    Pinehurst, North Carolina
    Larry Anderson
    One thing that might help you out is maybe try shooting with a manual lens. Put your camera in A mode. Doing this makes you set up the camera to take a picture. You would have to set the aperture, and focus manually for every shot....it might be a good tool to make you remember to check those things while shooting other lenses
     
  19. Just Jim

    Just Jim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    941
    Oct 20, 2011
    I wouldn't blame yourself at all... I disagree with my G2 meter constantly... especially as of late it's been really wacky. It hit the pavement at 45mph. I still suggest practice with the zone system, and you won't have to rely on your camera's metering to lead you astray when it want to completely balance a snene. Plus, it's Ansel Adams, his books have some really inspiring shots. I'd go with the camera, and the negative. Especially the negative. Amazon should have them pretty cheap used. It may seem esoteric, but they can really help.
     
  20. Phil66

    Phil66 Mu-43 Regular

    130
    Dec 27, 2011
    I've been reading "understanding exposure". It has helped understanding theory but putting it into practise is another thing.