Continuously circular xenon ring flash, cheap and slender for m4/3

zzffnn

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Just about any flash manufactured this century should be compatible. As far as I know, flashes with high-voltage at the camera contacts haven't been made since the 80s.
Very helpful!

What about center pin polarity difference? I heard Canon version is the same as Olympus, but Nikon version may be reversed? I am guessing the Canon version would work then?

There is also a version "for Minolta X7 and Leica R4" and a version "for all regular film cameras".
 

eteless

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What about center pin polarity difference? I heard Canon version is the same as Olympus, but Nikon version may be reversed? I am guessing the Canon version would work then?

There is also a version "for Minolta X7 and Leica R4" and a version "for all regular film cameras".
It's worth noting that the flash is actually the same for all of them, all that's different is the module on the bottom.

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If you search "Sunpak module" you will see what I mean...

TBH, I would expect the Canon version would work.
 

barry13

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Thank you!

That flash seems to use a flash sync cable with 2.5mm sync socket. I don't know how to use it n my E-M1 mk1. Do I need a hotshoe to 2.5mm socket adapter cable?

Is its trigger polarity ok with E-M1 mk1? What is "the safe voltage range" for E-M1 mk1?
Hi, the E-M1 mkI has a PC Sync plug on the front, which is probably 3.5mm... you could find a cake for that, or for the hotshoe.

I've also read 250V for the mkI, but most other modern cameras are much lower.
 

barry13

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Just about any flash manufactured this century should be compatible. As far as I know, flashes with high-voltage at the camera contacts haven't been made since the 80s.
These Sunpaks look much older... Afaik any flash that says thyristor on it is going to be old.
But if they're known to be under 250V, should be fine on E-M1 mkI.
 

zzffnn

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Wiki says Olympus OM-2 (for which one Sunpak version was made) introduced in 1975. Nikon F-3 was made in 1980. Canon AE-1 was made between 1976-1984.

So I guess it is still hard to say whether or not the Canon version will work? Let us see if the Japanese seller can measure voltage for me.
 

zzffnn

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It's worth noting that the flash is actually the same for all of them, all that's different is the module on the bottom.

View attachment 755465

If you search "Sunpak module" you will see what I mean...

TBH, I would expect the Canon version would work.
So that should mean that most, if not all of those Sunpak DX-8R flashes would have trigger voltage of 6.7v, correct?

Your measurement of 6.7v is very close to the number listed here (as 6v): Flash: Sunpak DX-8R | DPanswers

So I would guess the actual value should be way less than 24v, not to mention 250v.
 

eteless

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Wiki says Olympus OM-2 (for which one Sunpak version was made) introduced in 1975. Nikon F-3 was made in 1980. Canon AE-1 was made between 1976-1984.

So I guess it is still hard to say whether or not the Canon version will work? Let us see if the Japanese seller can measure voltage for me.
The OM-2n and 10 were released in 1979, the OM-4 was 1983 and used the same standard (but isn't on the flash), so it was probably released after 1979 but before 1983.

So that should mean that most, if not all of those Sunpak DX-8R flashes would have trigger voltage of 6.7v, correct?
Given that high voltages were safe on the OM series yet mine features a low voltage trigger, and high voltages are not safe for all of the EOS series... I would guess that it also uses a low trigger voltage.

...while I really can't say for certain I would think that most of the feet use pretty similar circuitry to keep costs down and the main difference is pin placement.

At the end of the day measuring it is always going to be the safest option.
 
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