Constellation of Orion

Discussion in 'Astrophotography' started by MadMarco, Dec 29, 2014.

  1. MadMarco

    MadMarco Mu-43 Veteran

    298
    Oct 30, 2014
    Guildford, England
    The constellation of Orion taken with Olympus E-M10 with Olympus 12-40 Pro @34mm - 10 frames @30seconds stacked in Deep Sky Tracker
    15952408249_327f409684_b.

    On the same night we had the Geminid meteor shower. I shot 200+ exposures and here are the 8 "positives" overlayed together (Orion constellation in the bottom right).
    16112702016_bb3f4fc3a6_b.

    You can click through to Flickr for bigger versions and more information.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2015
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  2. sprocket87

    sprocket87 Mu-43 Veteran

    306
    Jun 29, 2011
    Wow, amazing. I wish I had the patience to try star photography. Excellent work!
     
  3. tonyturley

    tonyturley Mu-43 Veteran

    374
    Nov 19, 2014
    Great work. The past two years, our sky has been a thick, unbroken layer of clouds when the Geminids were visible elsewhere. Bummer.

    Tony
     
  4. cyrax83

    cyrax83 Mu-43 Regular

    193
    Dec 8, 2014
    I wish Astrotrac/Space Tracker's would be simpler to use in the Southern Hemisphere (very difficult to align) and just in general and I'd be tempted to get one.
     
  5. MadMarco

    MadMarco Mu-43 Veteran

    298
    Oct 30, 2014
    Guildford, England
    Thanks Jesse, it's reasonably easy to take a nibble at astro photography. The features on the Olympus EM cameras make life really easy in comparison to others.

    Use a standard lens and a tripod, the intervalometer and the rule of 500 (max exposure to avoid star trails without a tracker is about 500/focal length in seconds). The patience comes in trawling through 100's of exposure the following morning!
     
  6. MadMarco

    MadMarco Mu-43 Veteran

    298
    Oct 30, 2014
    Guildford, England
    I hear you, we often miss them for the same reason.

    It wasn't an evening without it's own difficulties, the front of the lens on the camera was frozen over at one point. Fortunately I was using a filter so I didn't feel too bad about having to wipe the front every couple of exposures to prevent the frost. I was surprised that the battery on the E-M10 lasted much better than my old 700D did, 300+ exposures and no sign of being drained at -4'C is good going.
     
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  7. MadMarco

    MadMarco Mu-43 Veteran

    298
    Oct 30, 2014
    Guildford, England
    I have heard that this can be a problem for Southern hemisphere. You could try the iOptron SkyTracker along with the Android application Polar Finder (paid app that I bought, I believe that they do an iOS version) which made a great combination for polar alignment. The SkyTracker is a great little device for the money and the app is a few pounds.
     
  8. sprocket87

    sprocket87 Mu-43 Veteran

    306
    Jun 29, 2011
    Interesting... maybe I will give it a shot one day.

    So you're saying if I used a 40mm focal length (native, not equivalent) I would want to take exposures roughly 12.5 seconds long? Is there a rule as to how many exposures would be appropriate? I see you did 10x 30s, was that just a guess?

    Also, what focal lengths are most desirable? At first I thought a wide angle would make sense to capture a larger view of the sky, but then it might be tough to make out fine detail.
     
  9. MadMarco

    MadMarco Mu-43 Veteran

    298
    Oct 30, 2014
    Guildford, England
    That's correct, you could go somewhere around 10-12 seconds before you start to see star trails.

    The focal length is completely dependant on what you want to take a picture of, my Orion was 34mm native m43. Without a tracker you are going to be balancing focal length, exposure time and ISO, but don't be scared of pushing the ISO to 1600 particularly if you are stacking. If you stack then more are better than less; 10+ is a good target, with the Astrotrac I'm usually going for 30 @ 30-60 seconds. I can't do much more than 60 seconds with my telescope because light pollution becomes a significant issue.

    A final caveat with taking multiple exposures without tracking is that the sky is constantly moving so you might struggle to stack many images because the differences become too great, also the field curvature of the lens becomes a significant issue to alignment (this isn't a big problem if you are using an equatorially aligned tracker. You could always build yourself a tracker!

    https://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=70634
     
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  10. PhilS

    PhilS Mu-43 Veteran

    261
    Oct 24, 2012
    Brisbane, Australia
    Phil Savory
    Great photos MadMarco

    you can also just make a bit of the Flame Nebula near the lowest start on Orion's belt
     
  11. DynaSport

    DynaSport Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 5, 2013
    Dan
    I find these shots very impressive. Thanks for posting them.
     
  12. MadMarco

    MadMarco Mu-43 Veteran

    298
    Oct 30, 2014
    Guildford, England
    Many thanks for your kind comments.

    I find the more that I use my E-M10 the more I enjoy using it, it's such a fun and capable camera.