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Computer monitor calibrations

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by Empireme, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. Empireme

    Empireme Mu-43 Regular

    150
    Aug 25, 2011
    LA, CA
    Im currently making a website and blog for my work which consists primarily of my pictures. Ive been editing my photos on 2 different computers. And much to my surprise the edited pictures looked absolutely awful on the other computer screen because the colors were so different. And I would hate tospend hours editing my photos on a monitor that doesnt display accurate colors. So my question is how many of you invested in a computer monitor callibration software? Was it difficult? Which one would you recommend?
     
  2. acercanto

    acercanto Mu-43 Regular

    107
    Apr 15, 2011
    SW VA, USA
    I'm currently making the transition from a CRT to LCD screen, and I'm concerned about the same thing.

    Acer
     
  3. Grinch

    Grinch Mu-43 Top Veteran

    813
    Jan 9, 2011
    Canada
    A can of worms I hadn't pondered until now, I only view on my Mac and iPad and hadn't noticed any difference. So much for sleeping tonight...
     
  4. creezalird

    creezalird Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Oct 17, 2011
    if u are using windows 7, there is a built in calibrating app that u can use to calibrate your monitor even using multiple monitors.

    even if u are using any mac computers, there is also built in calibration app.

    though, you are using your eyes for calibrating, but i can say it is quite good for zero money :tongue:
     
  5. Empireme

    Empireme Mu-43 Regular

    150
    Aug 25, 2011
    LA, CA
    Sadly I am running windows vista... I cant tell you how badly it looks on the other one... I just cant figure out if one is the correct one or if both are way off...
     
  6. creezalird

    creezalird Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Oct 17, 2011
    really recommend you to upgrade. vista is like the black sheep of microsoft products. :tongue:
     
  7. hanzo

    hanzo Mu-43 Veteran

    341
    Jan 22, 2010
    Chan
    Hi Empireme,

    I recently purchased XRite i1Display2 calibrator. Quite pleased with the result. Although I think it will be even better if I upgrade my monitor to IPS panel.
     
  8. DDBazooka

    DDBazooka Mu-43 Veteran

    211
    Sep 3, 2011
    Calibrating your monitor won't do much if it isn't accurate to begin with.

    Look into some of the higher end IPS displays. The Dell Ultrasharps 22"-23" are pretty good and won't break the bank. (If you got the money though, the Dell 24/27/30, HP Z, and Apple Cinema Displays are quite nice as well...)
     
  9. addieleman

    addieleman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 5, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Ad
    Especially a run-of-the-mill cheap monitor may benefit a lot from calibrating because its colours can be way off (been there, done that). Of course, the end result is still inferior to what a better monitor can do, but it's still totally worth it IMHO.

    At present I have an Asus PA246 monitor which has an IPS-panel and is a lot better for photo viewing than my previous monitors. Calibration makes it even better, but I also calibrated our laptop and that took care of its odd colour rendition. For the record, I use a DataColor Spyder 3 Pro for calibration; it cost me 150 euros, but I consider it money well spent.
     
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  10. RetroBoy

    RetroBoy Mu-43 Regular

    See if you can find the installation disk for the monitor or go to their website and search for the correct profile for that monitor.
    Quite often Windows will just use a generic monitor .icc profile. The manufacturer's own profile will always be better.

    I use an Eye One Pro spectrophotometer on my 2 Dell Ultrasharps and also calibrate my wide format printer, desktop printer, scanner and even my new plasma TV with it.

    Nice to have everything matching and calibrated to industry spec.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. DDBazooka

    DDBazooka Mu-43 Veteran

    211
    Sep 3, 2011
    If you calibrate a TN panel that can't show accurate colors, won't after calibration, they still won't be accurate? (I'm using a low end monitor so I never bothered to calibrate :))

    and considering he has two likely different monitors, it will be very hard to get consistency between them.
     
  12. Empireme

    Empireme Mu-43 Regular

    150
    Aug 25, 2011
    LA, CA
    I am planningon purchasing an iMac. Is that an ips monitor? I have actually never heard of that acronym. And I am surprised to hear people say that a poor monitor can't be callibrated to display the correct settings. It seems to go against intuition - because doesn't the monitor just need adjustments?

    The monitors are a Dell 21" screen and a new hp laptop that the wife uses.
     
  13. Empireme

    Empireme Mu-43 Regular

    150
    Aug 25, 2011
    LA, CA
    Knowimg some things about lcd tv's and callibrations, I would think that's the whole purpose of a callibration is to adjust the color in order to show it correctly. Or either that my way of thinking is entirely flawed here.
     
  14. EP1-GF1

    EP1-GF1 Mu-43 Veteran

    312
    Apr 12, 2011
    Any monitor can benefit from calibration but how good the result is will depend on the quality of the monitor itself. Some screens will be quite easy to get to within a specification while others won't.

    If you look at reviews of televisions there are often charts that show how well the screen performed out of the box (usually appalling because Joe Customer loves a "punchy" image) and then how well it can be calibrated using a colorimeter.
     
  15. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Promit Roy
    Color is a subtle, complex thing. Monitor technology varies widely. Calibration will help EVERY screen, but your results can only be so close to correct, depending on what you have. I've noticed that many sites review LCDs post-calibration, which reflects their optimal performance but not how they will typically be used. To get a monitor that is highly accurate across the entire color range at all brightness levels, you will have to lay out at least a thousand dollars if not more for a high end design grade LCD. (And no, CRT does not fix the problem. They made design grade CRTs too.)

    Most of us do not have that kind of money for monitors. Just cameras :rofl:

    All of the monitors are compromises, but some are more compromised than others. Most consumer grade monitors are based on TN panels, which are cheap but relatively poor for color reproduction. They only have 6 bits per channel, which means that at a single instant in time they can only show 262,144 colors out of the potential 16.2 million colors your computer supports*. They also tend to suffer color shifting in the horizontal and dramatic color shifts on the vertical. Depending on how expensive it was, you may also have problems with the gamma curve and contrast levels -- particularly on glossy screens nowadays.

    IPS technology addresses a lot of these problems, and being more expensive monitors they are also more focused on fixing these kinds of problems.

    * If your monitor actually showed only 262,144 colors, everything would look terrible. So they employ spatial and temporal dithering, which uses a blend of multiple colors to trick your eye into seeing a color that does not exist. The quality of these algorithms varies. The new affordable Dell IPS screens actually do this, but the algorithm is really good.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Empireme

    Empireme Mu-43 Regular

    150
    Aug 25, 2011
    LA, CA
    This makes a lot of sense.

    But you know what's funny? When I started photography as a hobby, I told my wife that all I needed was one good camera and lens. In the last two months since i've started photography as a hobby I've purchased bags, straps, memory cards, a new lens.... Now I'm shopping for a new computer and an onboard flash. BUT I have some amazing pictures of my 4 month old daughter that'll last a lifetime and photography as a hobby has been so enjoyable. I never knew that the creative process of angles and light would be so damn fun. I watch movies and I start noticing DOF and the angles they use. So in the end it's totally worth it...

    Anyways, do you guys think that the iMac is a good enough monitor for an amateur pghotographer?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. hanzo

    hanzo Mu-43 Veteran

    341
    Jan 22, 2010
    Chan
    Wait...... you left the printer :eek: :rofl:

    Yes, family pictures is always priceless to have :thumbup:
    The iMac monitor is good enough I guess. But why not get a Dell Ultrasharp monitor ? Unless you're using Apple computer..
     
  18. Empireme

    Empireme Mu-43 Regular

    150
    Aug 25, 2011
    LA, CA
    Because the mac costs the same as the dell. And if I were to get the monitor I would need to purchase a computer on top of the screen. Because all my computers are at my business and this one would be left at home so I could work at home on the weekends. Pkus I dont necessarily need the absolute best in every purchase..gotta account for my budget and allotted expenses. That's how I've been debt free for so many years now.
     
  19. addieleman

    addieleman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 5, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Ad
    Most TN panels are capable of covering the sRGB colour space, or displaying accurate colours like you phrase it. Calibrating them invariably improved colour rendition a lot and by doing that you can also persuade two monitors to have very much the same colours.

    The problem I have with a TN panel is the very limited viewing angle, not so much the (in)ability to show accurate colours. More expensive monitors also perform better on evenness of brightness and black depth. I once tried to adjust two pictures to the same contrast and brightness on my TN monitor, only to find out that it mattered where the picture was located on the screen! That put me off to a degree that I purchased an IPS panel recently (Asus PA246).
     
    • Like Like x 1