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Colour not matching

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by JJH, Sep 8, 2010.

  1. JJH

    JJH New to Mu-43

    2
    Aug 9, 2010
    I have an Olympic E-P2 camera. Using different lens I still have the same problem with colour not matching what I see in real life. Example, a two tone purple flower (Morning Glory) is registered on the LCD and end photo as a blue flower. I tried white balancing and various other means to change the colour to reflect what is actual but without any success. Anybody have ideas what I am doing wrong and how to correct this?

    Thanks
     
  2. BBW

    BBW Super Moderator Emeritus

    Hi JJH, I've moved this thread in to the Olympus forum because "Help and Feedback" is in regard to the site itself, not cameras or photos. Depending upon what happens next you might consider posting the two images in the Image Works forum which is only open to Members.

    Let's start with are you using RAW or JPEG and what software are you using to process your photographs? If you are using JPEG there are in camera settings that can be having impact on how they show up..such as Vivid, Natural, sharpening, etc.
     
  3. slackmachine

    slackmachine Mu-43 Rookie

    21
    Jun 23, 2010
    Unfortunately, I have had the same problem. I've tried to capture the purple of one flower that I found multiple times, but the E-pl1 doesn't seem to render it correctly. I tried adjusting white balance and the color modes as well, and it still didn't seem to do the trick. I've always liked Oly colors but it just doesn't seem to like purple.
     
  4. BBW

    BBW Super Moderator Emeritus

    Hi, slackmachine - somethings got to be going wrong for you, too. I have taken plenty of flowers this summer with my E-PL1 and the colors always looked really good and quite accurate. Here's one example:

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/otra/4764574318/" title="P7041536 Asters by Otra2004 AKA BBW, on Flickr"> 4764574318_c7ed2c573c_b. "1024" height="768" alt="P7041536 Asters" /></a>
    Asters
     
  5. Dunkeld

    Dunkeld Mu-43 Regular

    94
    Jul 24, 2010
    Blue sky!

    I'm finding that the Blue in skies is often wrong. I set colours to natural, but I get this weird Blue. That said, It's early days and this is no big deal since it can be rectified in PS.

    The EP2 is a gem. I can see why people have taken to this camera so readilly. I only have the 14-42 for it so far. But, at the moment this is ample for my needs. I've some might shooting planned soon, capturing what are vivid LED lights on bridges, and their reflections on a river. This will be the Litmus test for me with the EP2.

    I'm stunned by the results that 1600 ISO give me in relation to noise correction with the EP2. In the past I got awesome images at night which were blighted slightly by noise in the night sky. I'm pretty confident that the EP2 will improve on past images, which struggled at 200 ISO.

    Apologies if this post wanders about a bit.

    Dave.
     
  6. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    I've had this problem with just about any camera I've ever owned. Some either make the purple too red or some make the purple too blue. Usually I just try and change it in PP.
     
  7. BillN

    BillN Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 19, 2010
    SW France
    do you only have the problems with purple and maybe (magenta)
     
  8. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    One thing I have noticed is that with purples and reds that I don't think the LCD on the camera displays them as accurate as my home monitor. Maybe thats the way my monitor is calibrated.
     
  9. BillN

    BillN Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 19, 2010
    SW France
    that's one of the problems that I had early on last Feb, when I started with M43 - I was advised by this Forum to calibrate my monitor as a first step - so I bought a copy of Spyder2 pro, (a piece of hardware and some software), and I started from that base.

    The more I read the more I find out that the major camera manufacturers have their own formula for processing, (which they will not share with anyone), so e.g when you are using Adobe LR or PS their (colour rendering?), software can be (is) different from, say, Canon or Nikon
     
  10. slackmachine

    slackmachine Mu-43 Rookie

    21
    Jun 23, 2010
    I think I found out that it's mostly just the white balance set a bit off. It really only happened to me a couple of times, because I don't usually take many macro shots. It's not that important to me though because I still get those amazing Olympus colors :biggrin:
     
  11. pictor

    pictor Mu-43 Top Veteran

    635
    Jul 17, 2010
    One just needs to forget wanting exactly the colors one sees in real life, too different are the way the human sees and the way the camera sees. In addition to that, each raw converter has its own philosophy (and the software in the camera which produces the JPEGs is a raw converter, too) and produces colors which are different to all other converters.
     
  12. pictor

    pictor Mu-43 Top Veteran

    635
    Jul 17, 2010
    I want to demonstrate this. I have exported the same picture taken with my E-PL1 with Olympus Viewer, Lightroom and iPhoto. I used the default settings.

    Olympus Viewer (which produces the same result as the camera)

    Olympus.

    Lightroom 3

    Lightroom.

    iPhoto

    iPhoto.

    Do you see the strong orange hue of the Olympus file? I took raw and JPEG then and this was the reason I switched to raw only, because AFAIK this strong orange hue does not correspond to the colors I saw when I took this picture.
     
  13. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    The orange(or warmer, more red) hue seems more typical of Olympus. Panasonic usually is more cool. For me, it depends on the lighting. When it comes to subjects such as flowers, I do want the color to be accurate to what I saw. For landscapes and large scenes, it doesn't matter to me as much.

    We have lots of those flowers around here, and if I had to guess, the second one is probably the most accurate, but it would depend on the time of day.
     
  14. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    621
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    As you've seen, these techniques don't work. In fact, it is impossible to fix the problem on an existing image, other than local painting of the proper color in an image editor.

    The problem occurs with both film and digital and affects all films and digital sensors to varying degrees. The root cause comes from the fact that the film's/sensor's spectral sensitivity curve is not an exact match to that of the human eye. With some subjects, most often flowers, the small differences in the fringe UV and/or fringe IR portions of the spectrum can result in large differences in color perception between the human eye/brain and reproduction by the film/sensor.

    Many flowers are extremely reflective in the IR. They often show patterns in IR that aren't present in what the human eye can see but well within the range seen by various insects from who's visits the flower benefits. When flowers we see as "blue" reflect massive fringe IR, as the morning glory does, the red filtered photosites, and the similar red-sensitive silver componds in film, record much more "red" than our eyes making the color reproduce as a purple.

    The only fix, other than localized retouching, is to use a very sharp IR cutoff filter that clips slightly into the visible red over the lens when taking the picture. The IR cutoff filter built in to most sensor assemblies generally doesn't cut off at a short enough wavelength to quite eliminate this problem.
     
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  15. Krang

    Krang Mu-43 Veteran

    202
    Feb 19, 2010
    Thank you dwig! What a lovely precise answer.