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Cleaning the Panasonix GX1

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by kakashi169, Aug 12, 2013.

  1. kakashi169

    kakashi169 New to Mu-43

    9
    Jun 4, 2013
    Anyone know how to clean these cameras?
     
  2. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    What part of the camera? The outside should be as simple as a damp cloth (no wet sprays). As far as the inside and sensor, I like those compressed air cans that don't leave a residue. If there's a stubborn bit on the sensor that won't budge with canned air, I've even used a cotton swab to gently dislodge the dust speck, although I wouldn't recommend that for everybody.
     
  3. kakashi169

    kakashi169 New to Mu-43

    9
    Jun 4, 2013
    Ah, thanks for the advice. The air duster is a good idea, I was looking for a solution to clean the grooves and such.
     
  4. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Being as the camera isn't weather-sealed, I would stick with applying a light cleaning solution (or warm/hot water) to a swab our cloth rather than directly to the camera, remember hot water is an emulsifier, the heart can clean gunk from small crevices on the device on the end of a cotton swab.

    How dirty is this thing?
     
  5. STR

    STR Mu-43 Veteran

    222
    May 16, 2013
    I wouldn't really recommend cotton at all. It leaves fibers behind. If you insist on using inexpensive household items, disposable coffee filters don't leave anything behind.
     
  6. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    I worried about that too. I haven't used cotton on the outside of the camera but found a swab useful for just nudging stubborn dust specks on the sensor without leaving any fiber or residue. Care is advised, heheh.
     
  7. Anthonys

    Anthonys Mu-43 Regular

    167
    Nov 17, 2011
    Sydney
    Anthony
    I would just use a damp cloth. I've noticed the metal on the hotshoe of mine has tarnished a little and wondering whether metal polish would be needed - just worried I may get it elsewhere. How is the metal on yours?
     
  8. Bif

    Bif Mu-43 Veteran

    380
    May 28, 2012
    San Angelo TX
    Bruce Foreman
    Canned/compressed air on the sensor is an extremely bad idea. Any kind of propellant can get in the air stream and if it gets under the top layer of the sensor you are stuck with that for the life of the camera.

    Even the compressed air from an "in house" compressor system is not recommended as moisture can form in the lines and you don't want that "spattering" inside your gear.

    Commercial sensor swabs and something like Eclipse cleaning fluid or the Visible Dust cleaning products are much safer and very effective. A bit pricey perhaps but nobody ever promised this was an inexpensive pursuit.
     
  9. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    I know the common wisdom says not to use propellants, but I feel that has been around for a long time, whereas air blowers have changed a lot due to environmental and equipment-specific factors. You can get some pretty good non-residual compressed air now that's designed for this kind of thing. I have always been more afraid of using wet processes on sensors just due to the danger of damaging them with your swab or cleaning material. As far as sensors go, I never touch them except when an infinitesimal nudge with some sort of soft swab is needed to get a stubborn speck off.