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Circular Polariser

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by sin77, Dec 18, 2011.

  1. sin77

    sin77 Mu-43 Veteran

    243
    Dec 9, 2011
    Singapore
    Do you attach this everytime you shoot bright outdoor?

    For those of you who may own more than one lens, how many CP filter(s) do you have?
     
  2. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Yes

    2 - the same one fits both my 20/1.7 and 45/2.8, and another fits the 45-200

    I don't have one for the fisheye or the Leica D 14-50
     
  3. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    I don't use mine for bright outdoors. I only use mine for difficult reflections and such.

    I just buy one larger CP filter, and step up all my smaller lenses to fit it.
     
  4. RayB

    RayB Mu-43 Regular

    158
    Nov 19, 2010
    California
    For my taste a polarizer, in general, takes the life out of an outdoors scene. I only use it to eliminate annoying reflections. But even then, it does not take care of the most annoying ones, metallic reflection. I very seldom use it. By the way you can use a regular polarizer (not circular) since there is no beam splitter in front of the sensor in the m4/3 cameras.
     
  5. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Yes, a linear polarizer is more effective. It's just a shame that DSLRs and consumer reliance on AF has forced manufacturers to stop making linear polarizers available. I hope they come to the realization soon that DSLRs are a thing of the past and it's okay to start making them linear again. ;)
     
  6. Art

    Art Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2011
    San Francisco, CA
    Every time I use polarizer I get worse results than without. Often unnaturally looking sky but especially skin tones seem to worsen a lot and quite hard to correct in LR. Oly already has vibrant color without any polarizer (you can always further enchance it in LR). As I understand the only reason to use such filter is to remove reflections from the water when photographing fish (I never do that). If I want to cut light, I use ND filter which doesn't affect the color.
    I'm now considering a grad ND filter which seems like something more useful for m43 and its limited DR.
     
  7. Gerald

    Gerald Mu-43 Regular

    67
    Sep 20, 2011
    I'm pretty surprised people don't like polarizers. I love what they do to skies and photos in general; seems almost always an enhancement to me. They are often on as a general filter on some of my lenses, taken of when shooting indoors...
     
  8. Art

    Art Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2011
    San Francisco, CA
    Maybe I just don't know how to use it correctly. Do you like its effect when shooting portraits? Does it help to remove flash reflections from the eyes? I'm always getting very saturated skin tones with CPL, I can't even correct it in post. I tried Marumi Super DHG and B+W MRC CPL.
     
  9. Gerald

    Gerald Mu-43 Regular

    67
    Sep 20, 2011
    Well to be fair Art, I mostly use them for work (film/video) and mostly used for scenic stuff. Landscape, architecture. But also interviews with people. So that is quite similar to portraits in photography to a certain extent. To me a polarizer during golden hour can yield really great results, and it seems to always give a punch to an image whenever the light is less than perfect or harsh. It does affect color because the sensor sees more color. So maybe the processing in the camera in combination with the polarizer is too much. It's also a matter of taste. Do you shoot raw or only jpeg?

    To me almost always when I see shots that were taken with polarizer I get that wow-feeling more easily. I still have to acquire me a polarizer for my 14-45 lens so I can get more experience on stills too on polarizers. A shot in video takes a few seconds. Looking at a photo can take much longer, so maybe that makes a bit of difference. Interesting though...
     
  10. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    I don't take many outdoor portraits, but love what it does for metallic/paint reflections/glare, skies, leaves, and water. It was absolutely critical on our 4wheeling trips in Moab.

    Depending on which way you are pointing relative to the sun, the effect can be more or less, but i generally prefer an image run through a polarizer, even non-optimized, compared to without.
     
  11. meyerweb

    meyerweb Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 5, 2011
    I used polarizers frequently, but certainly not always. There's no way to replicate its effect in post processing. Yes, if you have a blue sky you can tinker with it in PP, but if your capture has no real definition between sky and cloud you can't fix that in PP. You also can't readily remove reflections in PP.

    You can overdo the effect of a PL, but that's why they come in rotating mounts; you can adjust the effect to suit. Properly used, a PL can greatly enhance saturation in foliage (over used it can make foliage dull and lifeless). Properly used, it can enhance photographs that include windows. I don't think I'd ordinarily use it for portraits, though, unless an environmental portrait that would benefit from it's ability to darken skies and reduce reflections.
     
  12. RayB

    RayB Mu-43 Regular

    158
    Nov 19, 2010
    California
    Metallic reflections are not polarized
     
  13. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    If there's a mixture of clouds in the sky, then at times, I will use a CP for effect.

    If I want to shoot wide open with a fast prime outdoors, then I use a ND filter.

    My polarizers & ND filters are high quality B+W and Heliopan
     
  14. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    I don't use polarizers all the time. Keep in mind that it automatically makes you lose at least a stop of light. It's useful in many situations, but you need to try one yourself and see if you like the effect.

    Read these about how and when to use them:
    All about Polarizers - Linear and Circular
    How To Use A Polarizing Filter
    Polarizer
    Polarizers

    Also, feel free to buy one yourself and use it. Also, more importantly, DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY ON A CIRCULAR POLARIZER! They are much more expensive, complex, and difficult to make well-performing than a linear polarizer, so you're going to get exponentially better performance for your money using a linear polarizer. DSLR people have to use a circular polarizer because of their autofocus system, but m4/3 people don't have that limitation. So, since I just saved you a ton of money, go to your favorite online store and buy yourself a linear polarizer to test with. At the very worst, sell it locally or on these forums for little to no loss.
     
  15. Art

    Art Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2011
    San Francisco, CA
    The only linear multicoated polarizer I am aware of is B+W MRC which is still more expensive than top Marumi Super DHG CPL and it is not nearly as thin and light.
     
  16. JudyM

    JudyM Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 5, 2010
    Westminster, MD
    I have two: a 46mm circular for my Panasonic lenses, and a 55mm linear for my Carl Zeiss lenses. I guess the linear could be considered a piece of legacy glass, since I bought it years ago for the Zeiss lenses when they were new.

    I don't use polarizers all the time. I mainly use them when shooting around water, which I do a lot of. For controlling reflections and bringing out the color of the water and sky, they're a must-have. Between the two types, I prefer the linear. The effect with the linear is so dramatic, that it's quick and easy to dial in the amount of polarization you want. I find the circular to be more subtle.
     
  17. tanngrisnir3

    tanngrisnir3 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    594
    Oct 18, 2011
    Ummm...... no. In fact, categorically no.

    I've had a $30 Tiffen CP in front of a particular camera for well over a year, and found it one of the simplest, cheapest and best ways to improve certain shots.

    They aren't complex. They aren't expensive and they're not difficult in the least.
     
  18. meyerweb

    meyerweb Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 5, 2011
    And if you get a circular polarizer you'll be able to use it on other systems, too, where a linear pol might not work.
     
  19. stratokaster

    stratokaster Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 4, 2011
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    Pavel
    1) No. I usually use it only when needed (e.g. to darken the sky or to remove unwanted reflections)

    2) Only one. I step up all my lenses to 52mm filter size so I can use all my filters on all lenses.
     
  20. stratokaster

    stratokaster Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 4, 2011
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    Pavel
    Camera shops where I live simply don't sell linear polarizers.