1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

Circular or Linear polarizers

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by efontu, Jun 6, 2012.

  1. efontu

    efontu New to Mu-43

    6
    May 2, 2012
    Costa Rica
    Would you please tell me what kind of polarizers (circular or linear) are used with micro 4/3 cameras like my Oly E PL-1. Please advise what brand to buy (Hoya, B+W,etc) high end or less expensive.
     
  2. ean10775

    ean10775 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 31, 2011
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Eric
    Either will work on an m43 camera. Typically linear polarizers are a little less expensive and have a little stronger effect. The brands you listed are reputable, as well as Heliopan and Marumi. Generally you get what you pay for - more expensive polarizers have better coatings and degrade image quality less that cheaper filters. Weighing price vs. performance is a personal decision. I would say spend the money the get a multi-coated polarizer in the the largest size of the lenses you own or intend on owning and then buy step-up rings to be able to use that polarizer on all your lenses. Of course there is a limit to this - a 77mm polarizer on a 37mm filter thread will work, but will be unwieldy and look ridiculous.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. efontu

    efontu New to Mu-43

    6
    May 2, 2012
    Costa Rica
    Thank you very much for your comments. I really appreciate your help. Would you please care to comment about ND filters with the idea of shooting a lens wide open to decrease DOF in daylight situations. Is it necessary to have a full kit of these filters (ND1, ND2, ND3) or is it enough purchasing just one? Thanks again for your help ean.
     
  4. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    [post=25036]This post[/post] has lots of useful advice on polarizers including links to a good description of the difference between linear and circular polarizers and and some polarizer test results. While there (probably) is a correlation between price and performance for filters, it is definitely NOT linear (i.e. the cheapest filter provides maybe 90% of the performance of the best and a mid-priced filter might deliver as much as 98% of the top filters).

    Eric's advice to use step-up rings is solid as the cost of filters can add up quickly when you've got multiple lenses with different filter diameters.
     
  5. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    I would recommend starting with an ND3 filter and then determining from your usage whether it makes sense to invest in more.
     
  6. dre_tech

    dre_tech Mu-43 Veteran

    314
    Jan 31, 2012
    By ND 3 I presume you mean 3-stop? Or ND3 10 stop, like B+W marks them? Some people go straight to a 9-10 stop ones for long exposures.

    3-stop filter (0.9 density or NDX8) is great to start and to be able to shoot wide open, it also helps you avoid having to close your aperture too much to avoid diffraction.
     
  7. tjhcom

    tjhcom New to Mu-43

    4
    Aug 3, 2011
    I am having trouble seeing the effects of turning my circular polarizer on my E-M5. I carry a B&W mult-coated circular polarizer for three lenses - 12mm, 20mm and 45mm. My regular routine has always been to turn the polarizer until I see the maximum impact (e.g., darkest sky, reduction in glare on windows or water, etc.). I have read some other posts and know that others have experienced similar challenges and am curious as to the reason for this. Fore example, might the EVF make it more difficult to see the effect, vs. the optical viewfinders I've used in the past on other cameras? Thanks!
     
  8. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Promit Roy
    Using an LCD monitor as a test target should give you a clear indication of what the polarizer is doing.