Circular ND 10 stop filter for Olympus M4/3

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Jeff Worsnop, Nov 14, 2017 at 11:34 AM.

  1. Jeff Worsnop

    Jeff Worsnop Mu-43 Regular

    53
    May 20, 2016
    Jeff Worsnop
    Advice please, preferably from actual experience.
    Which of the numerous filters as above would you recommend I buy for seascape and landscape work ? I have read numerous reviews with much conflicting advice and so would appreciate real world unbiased opinions please.
    If you suggest a Lee square filter as an alternative would I need to make provision to stop light entering my lens from above and below the filter where there is a gap between the filter and the lens.
    Cheers
    Jeff
     
  2. SVQuant

    SVQuant Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 20, 2015
    SF Bay Area, California, USA
    Sameer
    Jeff,

    Question: which lens?

    I have had good success with Marumi and Hoya circular filters. I was using a 52mm set, but have recently switched to a 58mm (3-6-9 stop) set. AFAIK, neither of them make a 10-stop filter, but Hoya's 9-stop filters are really nice and I have good success with stacking the 9-stop and 3-stop.

    You might find this thread interesting if you want to go the rectangular route: (Rectangular) Filter Guide for Beginners

    Hope this helps.

    [Edit] I was incorrect and Hoya does have a 10stop filter in their PROND series.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017 at 1:14 PM
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  3. SojiOkita

    SojiOkita Mu-43 Top Veteran

    982
    Feb 23, 2014
    France
    I bought Haida Pro II MRC slim filters (a 6 stop filter and a 10 stop filter) with some cheap step up rings.
    I've been perfectly happy with it: they are reasonably priced filters with good quality.

    They may be other good filters (or maybe better filters) but I can't see a difference on image quality with and without the filters.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  4. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    Another vote here for Haida with their PRO-II Slim Multicoated filters. Excellent neutrality, and very affordable
     
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  5. stagor

    stagor Mu-43 Top Veteran

    692
    Aug 10, 2012
    Netherlands / N.Ireland
    Stan
    I too have Haida circular ND filters, they came as a set of 3, 3/6/10 stop. in size 58mm. they are stackable, and for storage in your camera bag they came with threaded blank metal end caps, they were inexpensive and seem to be well made, optically I have no complaints.
     
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  6. Wisertime

    Wisertime Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2013
    Philly
    Steve
    I also recommend Haida circular 10 stop filter. Also like HiTec 67mmx85mm square ND grad kits. Depends on your needs, budget, lenses, etc.. Much cheaper than Lee 7/5 and good quality.
     
  7. junkyardsparkle

    junkyardsparkle Mu-43 Top Veteran

    720
    Nov 17, 2016
    like, The Valley
    I also like my Haida 10-stop (it's more neutral than my Hoya 1-stop), but I did notice something a little odd about it recently... when viewing the reflections on the front of the filter, they have the faint greenish appearance typical of a good coated filter, but the side facing the lens is like a polished obsidian mirror! This seems weird to me, since the coatings on an ND filter would be for suppressing internal reflections, and not so much about increasing transmission, right? Since there seem to be plenty of people here with this filter, can anyone confirm that this is the case with their copy, too? I could almost believe mine was assembled backwards or something... :rolleyes:
     
  8. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    My Haida 6 and 10 stops are the same.
     
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  9. SojiOkita

    SojiOkita Mu-43 Top Veteran

    982
    Feb 23, 2014
    France
    Seems to be the same on mine.
     
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  10. junkyardsparkle

    junkyardsparkle Mu-43 Top Veteran

    720
    Nov 17, 2016
    like, The Valley
    Thanks for the feedback. So, does this seem weird to anybody else, or am I just confused? I have a B+W 2-stop that suppresses reflections similarly on both sides, and I seem to recall the soft coating on my Hoya did a very effective job of this on the inside before I stupidly destroyed it with an alcohol wipe...
     
  11. archaeopteryx

    archaeopteryx Mu-43 Regular

    87
    Feb 25, 2017
    From a reflection control perspective my instinct is also that the better coating would be preferable to the rear. However, it might depend on construction details of the filter or what's feasible with the thin film processes available. I think the Pro II MC NDs are coating based and it's my impression the ND coating usually only gets applied on one side. So that might also be a factor. Another consideration is reflection strength depends on angle of incidence and functional light angles do tend to differ substantially between the front and back of a filter. It's possible the difference might be related to some optimization for this. I don't have the exact filter in question, though, so would need to know more about the test methodology. Pictures could be helpful too.

    If Haida otherwise has a free hand and is simply limiting cost by using different coating processes on different sides of the filter I'd expect the choice to be made on the basis of whatever marketing thinks sells best. Presumably that would favour lower reflection on the front of the filter as that's the side which is viewed the most.

    Curiosity piqued, I had a look at a number of B+W, Haida, Hoya, and Marumi filters I own and didn't find any differences between sides. Don't have any Haida NDs at the moment but that does include a non-ND Pro II MC.
     
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  12. junkyardsparkle

    junkyardsparkle Mu-43 Top Veteran

    720
    Nov 17, 2016
    like, The Valley
    I was trying very hard to not think this exact thought... but yeah, it could be as brutally simple as that. As to test methodologies, you tell me... my curiosity is piqued as well, and while it wasn't my intention to hijack this thread (sorry, OP!) it does seem somewhat relevant, given the number of people suggesting this filter. I took some casual shots through the filter, flipping it both ways, but didn't notice any apparent difference; I'd be willing to do something more rigorous if I knew what would be most likely to shed some light. Meanwhile, here's a couple shots of the reflections, each the same long exposure, white balanced for the light source. As you can see, the difference is not subtle...

    gb144827. gb144826.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017 at 10:58 PM
  13. SpecFoto

    SpecFoto Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    404
    Aug 28, 2012
    So Cal
    Jim
    While I have Haida 100mm square ND filters for my Oly 7-14, for circular ND's you can't do any better than the multicoated B&W brand. I have long used these without problems that some brands develop over time.

    Both my 6 & 10 stop Haida square filters came with gaskets around the perimeter on the back side to block any stray light. Lee does the same on their Big and Little Stopper ND's. You will need a filter holder though, and the ND with the gasket goes in the back slot (closest to the lens), any other filter goes in the front slot. If you go this route, make sure to buy a filter holder that works with your largest diameter lens, you can use step down rings for smaller lenses.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017 at 1:35 AM
  14. Jeff Worsnop

    Jeff Worsnop Mu-43 Regular

    53
    May 20, 2016
    Jeff Worsnop
    Many thanks everyone for such informative and detailed replies.
    I'll check out UK supplies of Haida and B+W then spend some money.
    Jeff
     
  15. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Mu-43 Top Veteran

    819
    Mar 21, 2013
    N Essex, UK
    Mike
    I've never used a decent square type 10 stopper, but have played with welding glass (the ultra budget option) Stray light reflecting on the back of the filter (presumably via the top/bottom as you mentioned) was a real pain!
    In the light of this experience when I brought a photographic 10 stopper I went for a circular style, and despite getting a cheap brand the results have been fine.
    It doesn't manage quite the same amount of light reduction that some of my welding glass (the 'shade 14' tops 18 stops) but white balance & IQ are certainly improved. The welding glass still comes into it's own for photographing the sun unlike a standard 10 stopper it cuts the IR as well.
     
  16. archaeopteryx

    archaeopteryx Mu-43 Regular

    87
    Feb 25, 2017
    That came up not so long ago starting from here and here. What you've got looks plenty good to me for the purpose, though. If you wanted you could calibrate the test with a mirror, collect some averages of the white pixels in Photoshop or such, look your body's tone curve, and come up with numbers for the reflectances. Won't really result in new information, though, just a more specific statement of the trouble.
    How so? Last I checked B+W's offerings had substantially larger colour casts than most of their MC competitors. B+W is better than some at delivering claimed optical densities, such as Haida's Pro II MC ND64 which seems often reported closer to ND150. There's not exactly a shortage of reasonably close to spec ND filters priced nearer Haidas than B+Ws, though.