Changing lenses in a cave?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by ssgreenley, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. ssgreenley

    ssgreenley Mu-43 Top Veteran

    509
    May 12, 2011
    So, I know you're not supposed to change lenses in the desert or at the beach, but what about a cave? Tomorrow I'm visiting a cave with some ancient cave drawings, and I'd like to use my 12mm for wide cave shots and my 20mm for closer images of the drawings themselves. Will the moisture/something I haven't thought of cause me problems with my sensor if I change lenses in the cave? Inquiring minds want to know!
     
  2. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Naw you shouldn't have a problem, but you might want to keep your body pointed downwards so nothing drips or falls in when you change lenses. :)

    I miss my old weather-sealed Four-Thirds system for using in the grimiest of places. If I was going anywhere particularly dirty I would mount the EC-14 1.4x teleconverter, which is also weather sealed, and that would be my permanent base for swapping lenses. The camera remains sealed the entire time. ;)
     
  3. ssgreenley

    ssgreenley Mu-43 Top Veteran

    509
    May 12, 2011
    Thanks Ned! And while I always try to aim my camera down while changing lenses, this is probably a situation where "try" may not be enough!
     
  4. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    836
    Feb 29, 2012
    I've changed lenses on the beach and desert. It's not ideal, but a little common sense goes a long way. If the wind is blowing, I won't, but that's not always the case, and even windy days will have periods of calm.

    Same thing applies in a cave. If water is dripping on you or from you, that's a bad time. But a large microfiber cloth that can cover both the camera and lens will help, keeping the mount face down is a good habit, use the cloth to cover the lens. Learning how to do it without looking is a good skill to have, practice doing it with your eyes closed at home, then you'll be able to do it in the dark, one handed inside a jacket pocket, inside your coat etc.
     
  5. ssgreenley

    ssgreenley Mu-43 Top Veteran

    509
    May 12, 2011
    Thanks for the advice ya'll! It turns out that cave paintings are very, very difficult to photograph! Between the ridiculously low light and the fact that the cave is now millions of years deeper than it was when prehistoric man first doodled on its walls means that you're far away and at an awkward angle. A sight to see, nevertheless!
     
  6. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    836
    Feb 29, 2012
    So you're saving up for the 50/0.95?:)
     
  7. everythingsablur

    everythingsablur Mu-43 Veteran

    412
    Aug 4, 2010
    Toronto, ON
    What can work well in this instance is a well-placed off camera flash so that you can light up the cave from interesting angles.
     
  8. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    836
    Feb 29, 2012
    Many cave paintings sites do not allow extra lighting or flash, I would suspect the same here.
     
  9. everythingsablur

    everythingsablur Mu-43 Veteran

    412
    Aug 4, 2010
    Toronto, ON
    Ahh. I didn't know you were after cave paintings. That makes a lot of sense. Thought you were just in there for cave formations.