1. Welcome to Mu-43.com—a friendly Micro 4/3 camera & photography discussion forum!

    If you are thinking of buying a camera or need help with your photos, you will find our forum members full of advice! Click here to join for free!

Cards can and do fail

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by panamike, Sep 11, 2018.

  1. panamike

    panamike Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jul 5, 2016
    Lincolnshire UK
    Ok this may be in other threads but i thought it needed to be in the open, if you dontlike these guys please dont bury an important fact with moaning.

     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  2. Stanga

    Stanga Mu-43 Top Veteran

    664
    Oct 16, 2016
    What the video in reality shows is that the Canon EOS R caused a card to fail. The card did not fail by itself.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. ionian

    ionian Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 20, 2016
    Kent, UK
    Simon
    Lightning can and does strike humans, killing them instantly. But we don't all wear 6ft thick rubber soles whenever we go outside. Because we know that the risk is minimal.

    The data missing from all of these stories of card failure is how often and why, along with things like how old the card was, how it was treated, how often it was formatted etc.

    Boy I feel grumpy this morning.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Growltiger

    Growltiger Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 26, 2014
    UK
    The SD card firmware problems with the old Lexar 1000 SD cards, leading to unreliability is well known. I watched the bit where he takes the card out. Guess what - a Lexar 1000 SD card.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. Clint

    Clint Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Apr 22, 2013
    San Diego area, CA
    Clint
    An even with a Lexar Professional 2000x 32GB SDHC UHS-II card you might end up with
    Capture.PNG
    Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

    while using the OM-D E-M1 Mark II Lexar is not alone in this - I've also had SanDisk cards with the same issue. I was lucky and was able to save nearly 500 photos from the new Lexar card.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  6. dalto

    dalto Mu-43 Veteran

    302
    Jul 6, 2016
    Texas
    Is this a contested topic?

    All types of media are subject to a failure rate, even with proper handling and properly functioning devices. Spinning disks fail, SSDs fail, thumb drives fail and, yes, SD cards fail. If it hasn't happened to you yet you are either very lucky or your sample size is not that large.

    If the data is important, make sure you have a backup strategy.
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
  7. Telonson

    Telonson Mu-43 Veteran

    478
    Dec 24, 2017
    It was a production camera from a company that has two decades of experience in developing systems that write to NAND flash memory. It was also a high quality card. A Lexar card made by Micron, when Micron still owned the brand.

    And while all cards eventually fail. On average, the older Lexars were among the highest quality cards on offer. Unlike most of the rest, Lexar (through Micron) actually made all the memory that went into their cards.

    Cards fail by themselves all the time. NAND memory is a wear item, like a car brake pad. NAND memory's finite life time is generally measured by write cycles, but not always. Sometimes memory cards fail prematurely, partially or fully, and with no notice.

    One of the most catastrophic failure modes is memory controller failure. The controller is the brains of the card. Even if all the memory cells are in perfect condition, controller failure can render the card partially or completely unusable. If the controller fails outright, the card cannot be read, written to, or even recognized by any system.

    When a memory controller completely fails, the card becomes one with a brick.

    Have even had memory cards fail when not in use. Working perfectly when put into climate controlled storage. Afterwards, memory controller failure.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2018
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. panamike

    panamike Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jul 5, 2016
    Lincolnshire UK
    Why do people say computer files should be backed up at least once if not twice,then the same people say camera files are ok with out backing up in camera.:confused-53:

    Single card slots from Nikon and Canon IMO are a marketing thing, both can say they have given customers mirrorless cameras but both are still protecting the pro end of the DSLR sales.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  9. jaapvanderkooij

    jaapvanderkooij Mu-43 Regular

    77
    Nov 9, 2017
    So, actually you say, in every computer should be 2 hdd's, and write to them simultaniously all files? and after you finish, you copy your files to a back up medium.

    If I understand the guy in the video correctly he had 3 times a failure of a card in that trip, my guess is that he is doing something wrong then (or is that common with video, I only make pictures).
    so far I had one failure in 10+ years, the lock of the card was broken and Sandisk simply replaced the card.
    I replace my cards from time to time, usually when upgrading the body as newer bodies write faster again, so I buy faster cards.
    I think if I was working as a pro photographer, I would just replace all cards every year. just to prevent failures as much as possible.
     
  10. panamike

    panamike Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jul 5, 2016
    Lincolnshire UK
    Strange i dont remember writing that,i was talking about back up, mostly done off the computer via the cloud or external HD, i take a gamble and only back up once to an external HD.
     
  11. jaapvanderkooij

    jaapvanderkooij Mu-43 Regular

    77
    Nov 9, 2017
    You start with talking about backups for computers, doesnt mention how they are made, and then continue talking about

    So, here you say the back up should be made IN CAMERA, if I compare that to your quote about computers, you should write it in the computer to two seperate harddisks (two cardslots in a camera).

    Please dont be offended in any way, it is just how I read it.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. panamike

    panamike Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jul 5, 2016
    Lincolnshire UK
    Sorry i thought most would understand computer backup is only any good if its done off the computer, as for cameras you make the most of what you have for back up while your shooting, if its only a second card slot then thats what you use.
    If you have some form of wi-fi back up while shooting i guess thats better but thats something i know nothing about.
     
  13. Telonson

    Telonson Mu-43 Veteran

    478
    Dec 24, 2017
    Believe he said that 3 of the video clips were lost, all on the same card.
     
  14. gnarlydog australia

    gnarlydog australia Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Feb 23, 2015
    Brisbane, Australia
    Damiano Visocnik
    Purely anecdotal, of course, but my card fail rate is nonexistent compared to camera fails.
    All my cameras I ever had/have feature only one slot and luckily no card has failed on me yet.
    I wish I could say the same for my Olympus cameras, even tho only some have failed catastrophically (stopped working in the middle of a shoot).
    I often carry a spare camera body but almost never a spare card :oops: 
     
  15. panamike

    panamike Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jul 5, 2016
    Lincolnshire UK
    I think hardware failure is more likley, after all i have said my main complaint about one card slot is its ok so long as the possible downside is understood.

    Had two computer HDs fail over the years, first time i lost loads second time i was fully backed up to an ext HD
     
  16. Growltiger

    Growltiger Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 26, 2014
    UK
    It seems you don't know about the problems that Micron had with certain of their Lexar cards, near the end of their time. They had firmware issues with that card which were triggered when used in some devices. These problems relate to timing issues. Lexar admitted the problem, fixed the firmware in the cards, and gave free replacement cards to everyone who sent them in.

    My guess is that he has several of these cards and has never had a problem with them. Then he put them in a device which triggers the problem, and the cards keep failing. So it is wrong to blame the camera. Since he was testing the camera he should have used cards recommended by Canon, instead of using his old cards. He just assumed they were OK because he didn't know. If the camera had two card slots he might have had both cards fail.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  17. Telonson

    Telonson Mu-43 Veteran

    478
    Dec 24, 2017
    Not doubting that certain Lexar cards had issues, but sincerely doubt firmware related failures would exhibit themselves in the way Northrup's failure occurred.

    A cursory search suggests the Lexar firmware issue rendered cards completely unreadable. While in Northrup's case, only 3 files on the card were corrupted with the other files remaining readable.

    That's a fairly typical memory card failure. Common to all brands, makes, and sizes.
     
  18. dalto

    dalto Mu-43 Veteran

    302
    Jul 6, 2016
    Texas
    Lot of computers and even consumer grade storage units do this. It is called RAID.

    Speaking personally, yes, if the data is important I have at least 3 copies, one of which is off-site.

    People tend to be cavalier about backup and dismissive of the reality of data loss until they lose some important piece of data.

    The more time you spend with data storage the more you come to realize how fragile it really is.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  19. John M Flores

    John M Flores Super Moderator

    Jan 7, 2011
    NJ
    Yup, your backup strategy should be commensurate with the value of the data. I have two RAIDS on my desk, plus copies in a fireproof box and storage on the cloud.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.