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Canon FD 28mm f/2.8 - aperture control

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by curveshooter, Mar 13, 2013.

  1. curveshooter

    curveshooter Mu-43 Regular

    57
    Nov 29, 2012
    North Carolina
    I purchased this lens from KEH. Their description:

    "87-90 of original condition. Cosmetically, this lens is in very good shape with very limited wear on the lens barrel. The focusing is very smooth. The aperture is in great condition. The glass is very clean."


    P1000498.JPG

    P1000499.JPG

    When I turn the aperture ring, nothing happens. Aperture is as it is in the photo whether the ring is set to 2.8 or 22. Since KEH is a reputable dealer and their description described the aperture as in great condition, I'm assuming my newbish self is just doing it wrong. Suggestions?
     
  2. fin azvandi

    fin azvandi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 12, 2011
    South Bend, IN
    The FD mount is a little tricky at first. One of the pins/levers there on the mount would be in a different position when it is connected to the camera body (or your adapter). If you slide the pin to the correct position it will engage the aperture ring.
     
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  3. curveshooter

    curveshooter Mu-43 Regular

    57
    Nov 29, 2012
    North Carolina
    That worked, thanks.

    There are 7 marked aperture settings, but 13 clicks/aperture positions, so I guess these are considered 1/2 stops?
     
  4. edmsnap

    edmsnap Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Dec 20, 2011
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Correct.

    When you mount it to the adapter, make sure you follow these steps so aperture control will work:

    1. Install adapter ring onto camera: align the red dot on the adapter and red dot on the camera, twist to close.

    2. Stop the lens down to its smallest aperture.

    3. On the adapter, there is a ring that controls the position of a pin that allows for aperture control. Facing the front of the camera, turn the ring to its most counterclockwise position ("open").

    4. Seat the lens on the adapter (align the red dots). Now turn the adapter ring to its most clockwise position ("lock"). This aligns the pin with the lens pin.

    5. Twist the lens clockwise until it clicks shut. Now you should be able to rotate the aperture ring and see the aperture adjust. (The ring on the adapter can also be manually rotated, which will adjust the aperture, but fortunately it clicks to a shut position so you won't do it accidentally while shooting).
     
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  5. curveshooter

    curveshooter Mu-43 Regular

    57
    Nov 29, 2012
    North Carolina
    I recently acquired several Canon FD lenses and was having trouble with the aperture control and I remembered this thread. Your clear, consistent sequence got the aperture control working fine on all the lenses (I guess there were slight inconsistencies in the way I had done it, yielding inconsistent aperture control).
    Is the point of attaching the adapter to the camera first to make it easier to attach the lens to the adapter without inadvertently turning the adapter's ring?

    The downside I see to this method is it leaves the sensor exposed to airborne particles a little longer (not sure if that's enough to matter).

    Why not reverse steps 4 and 5? It seems to work in either sequence, and locking the lens on the adapter first eliminates the need for balancing the lens onto the adapter while turning the adapter ring to 'Lock'. Though I guess 4 before 5 is more convenient when switching between FD lenses.
     
  6. dougjgreen

    dougjgreen Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 5, 2013
    San Diego
    Doug Green
    This is why I despise the Canon FD mount. It's so complicated that most sellers (not KEH, but the vast majority of ebay sellers for sure) never can figure it out, so you really won't know if you're getting a working lens until it arrives.
     
  7. edmsnap

    edmsnap Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Dec 20, 2011
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Won't make any difference. I leave my adapters attached to the lenses permanently ever since giving up flim, so it becomes irrelevant, but I know most people don't want to buy more than one adapter. Either way, dust isn't that fast or insidious... or even a problem if you're reasonably careful.

    You can. But when outlining the steps, I had to pick one way or list all the different ones. The key to FD is "opening" the adapter, stopping the lens down, attaching the lens, and locking the adapter. You can do it a number of ways so long as the adapter is open before the lens goes on and locked after the pins and levers are in place. People usually only get in trouble when they have the adapter in the lock position and then attach the lens. :tongue:
     
  8. dougjgreen

    dougjgreen Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 5, 2013
    San Diego
    Doug Green
    For sure, Canon FD mount is the one for which I would be sure to buy a mount per lens and leave them on. Really no need with any well thought-out bayonet mount such as Minolta MD, Nikon F, Oly OM, Pentax K, Leica M or R, Contax-Yashica, etc.