BosStrap for M10 Markii

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by Zoom, Mar 5, 2016.

  1. Zoom

    Zoom Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Jan 2, 2016
    Marine, MN
    Lester
    Just wondering what camera strap to buy for carrying my Oly while hiking. I have only used the Olympus neck strap and I find that it isn't made for climing stepper trails because my camera starts swinging around if you have to let it hang to use both hands to climb. I would love some imput on what other hikers use that carry a camera. The BosStrap Generation 3 LT caught my eye, or is there something better. I have a backpack where the camera is safe from banging into objects, but some (Kodak Moments) will not waite for me to dig my camera out. Any input will be appreciated. Thank you.
     
  2. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    That's an example of what I consider to be a "true" (aka glide-type) sling strap and IMO a good choice for you application. The key feature is that the strap doesn't move as you bring the camera up. There are vendors who sell what are basically long neck straps where the whole strap has to shift. Avoid those.

    I have used this style of strap for years. The main problem with them is that the camera still swings. It's just swinging at your side, and maybe a little less, versus swinging in front of you on a neck strap. The fix for this is some kind of belt clip. I have made my own but there are at least a couple of commercially-available ones. With the camera anchored to your belt, two things happen: First, the swinging stops. Second, and very important, you no longer have the camera weight on your neck and shoulder. Thus, you no longer need a big and bulky strap. The strap really just becomes a safety strap that backs you up in case you drop the camera or it separates from the belt clip. My "strap" has evolved to be a piece of 550 paracord which just hangs loose. It weighs nothing and interferes with nothing. In fact, I have had to add a plastic pincer type clip to to keep it from slipping off my shoulder.

    So I'd suggest that you continue researching glide straps and add belt clip systems to your research. But don't forget that once you use a belt clip, the strap can be reduced to an ounce or two of weight.
     
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  3. Zoom

    Zoom Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Jan 2, 2016
    Marine, MN
    Lester
    Thank you for the info. The belt clip idea is the ticket, and along with the BosStrap Generation 3 LT would make a great combination. I will be heading to Zion National Park in about 3 weeks, and I always worry about my camera banging into a rock when climbing some of the more difficult hikes and getting damaged. I have found belt style clips for ff dslr camera's, but they look to be to big for my m4/3. I will be buying or creating something that will secure, but will be easy to release when the camera is needed.
     
  4. demiro

    demiro Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Nov 7, 2010
    Peak Designs is worth checking out: Capture
     
  5. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Actually, you can make the whole thing easily. Use a welded stainless ring for the slider. (The cut ends of a key ring/split ring will chew up the webbing. BTDT) One source: Berkeley Point - Stainless Steel RIngs

    Webbing is available all over the internet. A couple of suppliers I have used are: Order Straps, Buckles, Webbing, Tie-Downs | Strapworks.com and Sunbrella : Grommets : Clear Vinyl : Marine Vinyl : Outdoor Fabrics : Seattlefabrics.com. Plastic hardware is available many places as well. My favorite for selection and price is Plastic-Buckle.com They are in China; shipping takes about a week and a half.

    Re the belt clip, here is something to watch for: If the camera is held lens down on your belt, it is the first thing to hit when you sit on a rock, a bench, or a step. So you either have to take the camera out of the belt clip before you sit, or the clip system has to allow the camera to tip up/lens horizontal. My home-made system does this. I have not studied the commercial systems in detail but I have not seen one that includes a hinge.
     
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  6. Zoom

    Zoom Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Jan 2, 2016
    Marine, MN
    Lester
    Thank you guys for the info,and web links they will be very useful.
     
  7. TassieFig

    TassieFig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    537
    Oct 28, 2013
    Tasmania, Australia
    @oldracer@oldracer
    Some pictures of your system would be great ;)
     
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  8. TassieFig

    TassieFig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    537
    Oct 28, 2013
    Tasmania, Australia
    I'm using a Peak Design Leash which is a very nice and smooth strap. I got it setup as a neck strap (ie connectors at both lugs) but almost always keep it across one shoulder, on top of the backpack straps. That way it doesn't swing around much when scrambling up steep and rocky slopes. It's out of the way but still very easy to slide up for a snap. If I have a "bigger" lens, I have a piece of elastic string with a small loop attached to my belt that I can quickly put around the lens to keep it more firmly against the body.

    I also have a Capture knockoff but it's just way too bouncy for my liking. Also, if you're short, fat and curvy, it's tricky to find a comfortable place to attach it... :crying:
     
  9. sammykhalifa

    sammykhalifa Mu-43 Top Veteran

    762
    Jun 22, 2012
    Pittsburgh PA
    Neil
    If you're hiking with one lens, a holster-style camera bag might be a good idea. I have a small tamrac one with belt loops on the back.
     
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  10. Schwert

    Schwert Mu-43 Rookie

    21
    Mar 2, 2016
    I really like these ThinkTank straps that attach to my backpack straps. Camera is held close and weight is not on neck. The clips snap around my neck strap and release quickly. Swing of the camera is much reduced too. Neck strap I keep around my neck as a safety, but it is completely slack as you can see in the photo (Nikon V1 at Bryce).


    Think Tank Photo Camera Support Straps V2.0 (Black) 258 B&H


    Bryce R w ThinkTanks.
     
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  11. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Sorry for the delay. I have been down with a cold and busy. Here is a snapshot of some pieces:
    upload_2016-3-11_9-32-49.
    There are basically two totally independent pieces: The strap and QR system and the belt clip.

    The belt clip is shown at the bottom right. It's a simple loop of wire that captures a two-way Arca-Swiss plate. Mounted on the camera, the forward (shiny) edge of the plate is underneath the lens mount flange and the camera hangs lens-down. As I mentioned in the previous post, the clip is hinged to allow the camera to move from lens-down to horizontal when I sit on a bench, step, or other wide seating. (In most arm chairs, there isn't room for the camera so it must be unclipped before you sit down.) At the upper left, My GX8 is clipped to a Think-Tank style belt and you see it tipped to horizontal. One area where I differ from commercial clips is that I have no positive retention. The plate simply slips into the U-shaped section of wire and is held by gravity. The upside of this is that I don't have to manipulate any buttons or levers when I want to lift the camera to my eye. The downside is that there has to be a safety strap on the camera as it can be knocked loosed from the clip.

    Re the strap system, the GX8 is wearing the first basic piece, a pigtail with a female QR "Barrel." The pigtail length is chosen so that all the hardware drops below my hands as I hold the camera. I've often made these out of nylon cord looped through the camera strap anchor; this one is made with two independent lengths of stainless steel fishing line. Each line is 80# test and probably 160# yield load. The only reason I have two is that one, while adequate from an engineering point of view, just looked too flimsy and there was some tiny risk of the crimped connections slipping. A neck strap is at photo center. Here you can see the other half or the rifle sling swivel both open an plugged into a barrel. Since I normally have only one pigtail on my camera, the neck strap carries a second one that is attached to the camera right side with a fishing snap hook. A little ugly, but strong and quick to attach and release. Finally, at the top right are two glide straps. I like the leather one with the brass harness buckle for its looks, but my workhorse is the paracord strap. Remember, with the camera weight on my belt, the glide strap is more a safety strap and there is no weight on my shoulder. So no need for a big strap or a strap pad.

    I also have a few wrist straps that I can use when circumstances dictate. I have attached barrels to my tripod, monopod, and radio slave, so I can use the various straps with them as well.

    If anyone wants to get serious about copying or adapting these ideas, please PM me or ask here in the thread. I have left important construction details out of this post for brevity. I can add them in another post if necessary.
     
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  12. Schwert

    Schwert Mu-43 Rookie

    21
    Mar 2, 2016
    I like that U shaped wire idea around the plate. A swinging camera I just hate and this is simple, clean and light. I assume you made that out of coathanger guage wire?

    I have a full length arca plate on my E-M1, so this rig would not work as easily, but this is food for thought

    This is a DYI Peak design capture sort of idea eh, with none of the complexity?
     
  13. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Coat hangar wire is great for prototyping because it is nice and soft. Too soft. For the final products, I use 0.091" spring steel wire from Brownells. (World's Largest Supplier of Gun Parts, Gunsmith Tools & Shooting Accessories - Brownells) This is much tougher stuff and is difficult to bend. It is stiff enough that I have not bothered to heat treat the wire to make an actual spring, but that is an option.

    If you're thinking about playing with the idea here are a couple of tips:

    1) Theoretically the Arca plate could escape from the "U" by riding up and then camming the upper part of the "U" wide enough for the plate to pull out. I don't think this is a practical risk due to the stiffness of the wire, but note that the hinge design is such that the top of the "U" is restricted from expanding.

    2) When the camera is horizontal it is easy for it to slip out of the ""U," moving towards the wearer's belt. The hinge point needs to be close enough to the back of the camera that the camera back hits the belt before the plate can slide completely out of the "U."

    Re Peak I had mine before they offered theirs! :2thumbs: Also, they have two constraints that I don't have. First, they want to sell to users of very heavy cameras, hence the hardware must be bigger and heavier. Second, for liability reasons they probably need to have positive retention, hence the hardware again grows in weight and complexity. So their product doesn't meet my needs and my little wire gadget really couldn't compete with them in the marketplace.
     
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  14. Zoom

    Zoom Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Jan 2, 2016
    Marine, MN
    Lester
    After a lot of research I went to West Photo in Minneapolis,Mn today and after looking at the Peak Design Capture which was on display. I decided to buy one along with the peak design leash. They were out of the lower priced capture, and they offered me the capture pro for $6 more than the lower priced capture model. So with the Capture Pro I can anchor my camera to my backpack shoulder strap, and the leash attached to one camera
    lug and tether it my other shoulder strap. It might save my camera if I accidentally drop it. The leash is versatile can be used many ways, and the capture plate locks onto my Manfrotto tripod. So I think my reason for my initial post is solved. :2thumbs: