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BLH-1 Chargers

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by bassman, May 27, 2017.

  1. bassman

    bassman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 22, 2013
    New Jersey
    The Bassman
  2. ac12

    ac12 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 24, 2018
    I would not use it.
    In looking at the image, there are only TWO charging pins. This means that the charger is not monitoring the battery temperature. Therefore, if the charger misses the full charge point, it does not have a secondary overcharge protection (Positive Temperature Control), and it will overcharge the battery.
    Overcharging generates gas, gas = swollen battery.
     
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  3. jbruce

    jbruce Mu-43 Rookie Subscribing Member

    23
    Oct 15, 2017
    Northern Minnesota
    John
    I think I've solved the problem of overcharging lithium batteries with cheap 2-pin chargers. I just use a 110 volt plug-in timer set for 3 hours, then it turns off. Result-fully charged and no chance of overheating or over charging. I always use until the battery flashes discharge. I did suffer 2 Wasabi battery swellings before I began using the timer, both replaced' no charge, under warranty. Works for me. John
     
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  4. Matt Drown

    Matt Drown Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Dec 9, 2015
    California, USA
    I have one of those double units, it take the same plates that are on all the small no-name chargers. I've used it to charge a BLH and BLN battery at the same time (and 2x of the same also). I just leave it in overnight, and unplug it.

    You can pick up one of these - https://www.amazon.com/DSTE-Charger-Olympus-Digital-Battery/dp/B06WRNXYGY - and then just swap plates if you want.

    It's lightweight, but a bit chunkier than two olympus charging units.
     
  5. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    I got this one for USB charging. Works great for travel because I use it with an Anker multiport USB charger. Only two charging pins, but I don't think you'd find anything that's not an OEM charger that has all the pins.
    Newmowa Dual USB Charger for Olympus BLH-1 and Olympus EM1 Mark II Camera
    by Newmowa Digital
    Learn more: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06WP6TZNN/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_fMYaDbTV151HB
     
  6. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    To nitpick a little, if the charger and the battery have no faults, then the battery won't be overcharged even without the temperature monitoring. But to your point the temperature monitoring is to prevent a number of faults or conditions from causing thermal runaway in the battery. These could include a problem with the battery itself, a fault in the charging circuit, or even just charging the battery in a high ambient temperature.

    So these charges work great so long as the battery is good and the charger is good. But no protection in case of failures in battery or charger.
     
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  7. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    I am not sure if this is helping at all. As I mentioned above, when everything is working properly then you won't get overcharging nor overheating. But when you get a fault the overheating can happen well before a battery normally takes to charge.
     
  8. tkbslc

    tkbslc Super Moderator

    I only need 2 pins (+/- terminals) to measure voltage of a battery. So presumably any 2-pin charger could have some smarts built in to do that too. Once you reach max voltage, just shutoff and you won't overcharge and would only overheat if used outside of regular conditions or battery defect

    Think about a AA battery charger. I have a nice Sony 4 slot one that individually charges batteries that can be different capacity or charge state. It charges each to the max voltage (~1.3A for NIMH) and then shuts off each battery individually. One might charge for 10 minutes (Guess it was full), one for 2 hours, and another for 8. There are no charging chips or heat sensors on AA, yet there are plenty of smart chargers.
     
  9. ac12

    ac12 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 24, 2018
    Positive Temperature Control (PTC) is a safety mechanism for lithium batteries, to try to prevent explosion and fire from overcharging or as @PakkyT@PakkyT said, a battery fault. And there have been several incidents of that, which is why the PTC safety mechanism in lithium batteries.
    One of the problems is that lithium batteries do not have a vent, so when they overcharge, the gas that is generated causes the battery to swell. And you then have a battery that might get stuck in the camera.

    As for AA batteries. As I understand it, smart chargers look for a voltage peak and drop, to determine when full charge has been reached on NiCd and NiMh batteries. This works 99+% of the time. The problem happens in that small 1-% of the time, when the charger misses that voltage change, which is smaller and harder to detect with NiMH batteries. Or if due to a battery fault, it never reaches that voltage change and just gets HOT. And while it does not happen often, it does happen. I have had several NiMh which the smart charger did not detect full charge (or had a battery fault), and were overcharged to the point where the battery was HOT. I have marked these batteries as possibly bad, and if it happens a 2nd time, it is marked as bad, and put out for recycle/disposal.

    The thermal sensor/PTC is a secondary line of defense to prevent overcharging/overheating, and only comes into play a small % of the time.

    In the case of a lithium battery, the charger maker has to reverse engineer the PTC circuit to determine what signals the PTC uses and how to properly communicate with it. And this may be different for each camera brand and/or each battery type, so this can be expensive to reverse engineer.

    Putting a thermal/temperature sensor or PTC circuit in a charger adds more cost to the charger, so guess what, no thermal shutdown circuit.
     
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  10. Carbonman

    Carbonman Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jul 10, 2014
    Vancouver BC
    Graham
  11. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    I have looked at that one before and I like that in addition to being able to charge a pair of Oly batteries, it could also charge 4 AA batteries so one charger for your Oly camera and hot shoe flash. But as I recall, it was pretty darn pricey? I will have to see if I can find it again at a seller to check the price.

    EDIT: Oh ya, now I remember. B&H Photo for $80 USD. A lot for a charger.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
  12. Carbonman

    Carbonman Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jul 10, 2014
    Vancouver BC
    Graham
    It's not out of line pricewise. An Olympus single battery charger is $59; the Hahnel charges 2 BLH-1 batteries simultaneously and has charge level and heat sensing built in as well.
     
  13. ac12

    ac12 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 24, 2018
    Heat sensing would be great, but I could not find anything in the brochure or manual about heat sensing of the battery.
    In looking at the drawing in the manual, it appears to be a 2-pin charger. So it would have to use external thermal sensing of the battery; IR or physical contact temp sensor which has to determine the temp through the plastic battery case.

    Price wise you are correct, kinda. Buy two $60 Olympus chargers and you are at $120.
    But you already have one with the camera, so you are only buying a 2nd charger.

    Still, I like the idea of a single dual charger vs. two single chargers.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
  14. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    Ya and I ain't buying one of those either! :cautious:
    Fortunately Oly includes one with the camera so if I need more, 3rd party manufacturers get my business. :2thumbs:
     
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  15. Amol Thorat

    Amol Thorat Mu-43 Regular Subscribing Member

    45
    Jun 1, 2019
    Seattle WA
    Is this the right thread to also ask about batteries for EM1.2? I am new owner of that body and was looking for batteries on Amazon. Unlike other OM-D models, EM1.2 batteries are sparse, and whatever are there reviews are quite bad. The only "good" review I found was for a brand called Kastar (2 batteries+dual charger) for $44. Wasabi, which I have used for numerous other cameras has surprisingly poor reviews for this particular battery type. Any tips? I admittedly haven't checked Adorama but my past experience is that Amazon is always the cheapest with least hassle if something goes wrong.
     
  16. ac12

    ac12 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 24, 2018
    You take your chance with a 2-pin charger. Read the thread.
    I think there are several other threads which discuss battery and chargers.

    The battery for the EM1-mk2 has a slightly higher voltage than the lithium battery for the other EM cameras. That is likely why there are less 3rd party batteries out there.
     
  17. Matt Drown

    Matt Drown Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Dec 9, 2015
    California, USA
    @Amol Thorat@Amol Thorat if you are coming from pretty much any of the other olympus cameras, the battery life on the em1.2 with the newer battery type lasts about twice as long (compared to my em1.1 I had previously). So with that in mind, you can evaluate just getting an olympus battery. Two batteries lasts me all day of city street shooting without an issue. It's not shot time, but "on" time that really matters.

    My used em1.2 came with some third party batteries that work and charge, but don't report status in the LCD, and last about 80% as long as the olympus battery. I have no issues with third party chargers on my batteries.
     
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  18. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    Yes, on my E-M1 (mk1) I have got into the habit of turning the camera off between shots or groups of shots. On previous 4/3rds (dSLR) I could leave them on and let them go to sleep. Those older cameras didn't use much energy just being on where as, as you point out, mirrorless use about the same amount of energy all the time when on, regardless if you are actually capturing photos or not.
     
  19. Matt Drown

    Matt Drown Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Dec 9, 2015
    California, USA
    I have sleep set to 60 seconds, LCD to 30 seconds, and Auto-Power-Off to 1h. All under Gear-J2. I also turn off the EVF/LCD auto detect, and just use the EVF. However EVF VS LCD power consumption is about the same, turning off the auto detect results in less time being on if you have it around your neck though, because you aren't triggering activity.

    I think these settings are almost default, but works well. The camera wakes from sleep with a 1/2 press of the shutter button, which I do when I bring the camera to my face from the side of my body, and it wakes in 1/10 to 2/10ths of a second, very rapidly. If I've left it on for an hour, it doesn't wake, you need to flip the power switch.
     
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