Black and White Landscapes

Crdome

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Shiprock (Navajo: Tsé Bitʼaʼí, "rock with wings" or "winged rock"[4]) refers to the legend of the great bird that brought the Navajo from the north to their present lands.[5][6] It is a monadnock rising nearly 1,583 feet (482.5 m) above the high-desert plain of the Navajo Nation in San Juan County, New Mexico, United States. Its peak elevation is 7,177 feet (2,187.5 m) above sea level. It lies about 10.75 miles (17.30 km) southwest of the town of Shiprock, which is named for the peak.

Governed by the Navajo Nation, the formation is in the Four Corners region and plays a significant role in Navajo religion, myth, and tradition. It is located in the center of the area occupied by the Ancient Pueblo People, a prehistoric Native American culture of the Southwest United States often referred to as the Anasazi. Shiprock is a point of interest for rock climbers and photographers and has been featured in several film productions and novels. It is the most prominent landmark in northwestern New Mexico.

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Shiprock AZ i by Michael Atwell - Chrome Dome, on Flickr
 

magIBIS

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A fairy tales garden
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Shiprock (Navajo: Tsé Bitʼaʼí, "rock with wings" or "winged rock"[4]) refers to the legend of the great bird that brought the Navajo from the north to their present lands.[5][6] It is a monadnock rising nearly 1,583 feet (482.5 m) above the high-desert plain of the Navajo Nation in San Juan County, New Mexico, United States. Its peak elevation is 7,177 feet (2,187.5 m) above sea level. It lies about 10.75 miles (17.30 km) southwest of the town of Shiprock, which is named for the peak.

Governed by the Navajo Nation, the formation is in the Four Corners region and plays a significant role in Navajo religion, myth, and tradition. It is located in the center of the area occupied by the Ancient Pueblo People, a prehistoric Native American culture of the Southwest United States often referred to as the Anasazi. Shiprock is a point of interest for rock climbers and photographers and has been featured in several film productions and novels. It is the most prominent landmark in northwestern New Mexico.

View attachment 529378
Shiprock AZ i by Michael Atwell - Chrome Dome, on Flickr
I've only seen Shiprock from an airplane, flying from San Diego to Denver. It was at dusk and the rock projected a miles long shadow along the desert floor. It was such an inspiring sight that I poured over maps when I got home, noting the approximate time that we had passed it, and estimating about where to look.... and to find out how to climb it. Unfortunately, climbing on Navajo lands is illegal, and the ban enforced on the Shiprock formation after an accident in 1970. There are still clandestine missions by climbers to get up the thing, but it's officially frowned upon. While I respect route closures, as it helps to not jeopardize climbing access to open routes, I've never been so tempted to do a bandit climb of something off limits. Maybe it will open someday, or change to a seasonal optional closure like Devil's Tower, in which case I'll be there in a flash. Apparently the quality of the climbing is not great, but the position surely can't be beat.
 

Crdome

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I've only seen Shiprock from an airplane, flying from San Diego to Denver. It was at dusk and the rock projected a miles long shadow along the desert floor. It was such an inspiring sight that I poured over maps when I got home, noting the approximate time that we had passed it, and estimating about where to look.... and to find out how to climb it. Unfortunately, climbing on Navajo lands is illegal, and the ban enforced on the Shiprock formation after an accident in 1970. There are still clandestine missions by climbers to get up the thing, but it's officially frowned upon. While I respect route closures, as it helps to not jeopardize climbing access to open routes, I've never been so tempted to do a bandit climb of something off limits. Maybe it will open someday, or change to a seasonal optional closure like Devil's Tower, in which case I'll be there in a flash. Apparently the quality of the climbing is not great, but the position surely can't be beat.
I walked all the way up to the base. Im not a climber but it looks pretty crumbly. It would certainly be amazing.
 

aKilter

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Dec 13, 2013
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Dave, I always add a 2px black fram then a 2px darker gray to the image "canvas" to define the borders against the monitor's white screen and against Flickr's background.
I use the medium theme and hadn't thought about adding a dark frame. I switched to the light theme and see what you mean. A black frame is a good idea. Thank you, Chrome!

I've got a few more similar photos, from our last snowfall a few weeks ago. They are already cropped and processed, so I don't know if I'll be able to add a frame, without affecting the crop. Can you add a frame around the perimeter of the photo? Obviously, I don't do much framing. Any I have done, use up part of the photo.
 
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