Birmingham, AL : Sloss Furnaces

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Aug 28, 2018
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106
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Treasure Coast FL
Went to Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark earlier today.

Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark - Birmingham, Alabama

Opened in 1882 and operated through 1970. None of the original buildings are there, but there are still two 400-ton blast furnaces, surrounded by an assortment of other buildings and structures. It was fascinating to see how this process worked, and I can only imagine the conditions the men that worked there endured.
Lots of images on this one ( if it's too many, I apologize. Let me know and I will delete some.)
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felipegeek

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Felipe
Feels eerie in a way even with the nice light. I like the porthole shot best but nice compositions on much of it. The set transmits some of the history and decay nicely.
 
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Steve
Enjoyable scrolling through these shots. When I was 21 and had just finished my electrical apprenticeship I got a job as a maintenance electrician in a smelting works, I've worked on ancient switchgear like this as it was still operational in the late sixties.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Treasure Coast FL
Enjoyable scrolling through these shots. When I was 21 and had just finished my electrical apprenticeship I got a job as a maintenance electrician in a smelting works, I've worked on ancient switchgear like this as it was still operational in the late sixties.
That switchboard was a sight to behold. Someone was actuating one of the handles (I was surprised that they let people touch any of the moveable stuff) and I could hear something clunking one floor down. It was a Rube Goldberg scenario for sure, except I never did see where the thing was that was moving.

Nice set of photos. I love the immense scale being shown. There is also something very sensual about the old manual controls.
Thanks.
These controls were impressive. No stamped steel or plastic knobs there. Just a different era and class of manufacturing for sure.
 

Sam0912

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Mar 1, 2012
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Manchester UK
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Sam Roberts
I’m another electrician who cut his teeth in industrial factories, in my case mostly GEC sites (before they got bought by Alstom). I love places like this, really takes me back.

Thanks for sharing, even though it may eventually cost me money (I’ve been eyeing that PL 8-18!)
 
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