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biking and photography?

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by nursenicole, May 3, 2011.

  1. nursenicole

    nursenicole Mu-43 Regular

    76
    Feb 24, 2011
    boston
    does anyone here ride and take their gear with them?

    i recently got a mountain bike and it is quickly becoming a favorite outdoor mode of transportation...but i'm not sure it's compatible with photography gear.

    if any of you out there are involved in both - and take your gear with you on the bike - i am interested in how you protect your camera and accessories during the ride! (besides not falling, of course :smile:)
     
  2. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Tenba mini-messenger. Would be better if it had the cross strap like a "real" messenger bag, but once you use a messenger bag on the bike, you'll see why people who do it for a living don't wear backpacks.
     
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  3. unkabin

    unkabin Mu-43 Regular

    170
    Feb 17, 2011
    Minnesota
    I commute by bicycle and carry my camera everyday. I keep it in a handlebar bag. Maybe not to everyone's liking, but it makes for quick, easy access to the camera. Mine is made by Arkel (non-waterproof). Ortlieb makes waterproof bags, and they also sell a camera insert as an accessory. Both Arkel and Ortlieb are pricey--Topeak is a little more reasonable, and the Ortlieb camera insert fits in the Topeak bag. Here's a good online store that carries all these brands. Respected, responsive seller: TheTouringStore.com, Ortlieb Panniers & Packs, Tubus Racks, Lone Peak Packs

    There are plenty of cheaper waterproof bags, too. I tried a cheap one first, and it was waterproof, but it quickly sagged so that it was riding against my headset. I have a waterproof cover for my non-waterproof bag, and I feel fine with that.

    Besides commuting, I tour lightly. My bike is one of the main reasons I switched from a DSLR to a Lumix.

    A couple snapshots (roadbike bars, but they work with mountainbikes, too):


     
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  4. soundimageplus

    soundimageplus Mu-43 Top Veteran

    782
    Feb 2, 2010
    Worcestershire
    I'm afraid I just sling the strap across my shoulder and carry it like that. I usually take something like a GF1 + 20mm. No extra gear. I am a fair weather cyclist however.
     
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  5. SRHEdD

    SRHEdD Mu-43 Top Veteran

    967
    Feb 24, 2011
    Viera, Florida USA
    Steve
    I was going to say the exact thing! I took my camera to the bike store and found a barbag just big enough to carry what I needed. I wrapped the camera in a terry towel and placed it in the bag. A bike-brand product is less obvious as well. Worked for centuries and off-road trips both. I got to the point that I could easily open the bag and grab the camera, take a shot, and put it back in a safe/stable manner. I liked taking a P/S more than my DSLR because I could OFF/ON/ZOOM/TAKE with one hand.
     
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  6. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    I don't tend to carry anything larger than my LX5 when riding. In a pinch it can fit in a jersey pocket, but I got a little neoprene optech case for it that doubles as a mini-bar bag. I don't take the camera usually, but when I do, that's what I take out.

    -Ray
     
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  7. Put the strap around your neck and then slide one arm through as well. The camera will sit against your side without bouncing around too much, but still be accessible to take a shot while on the move. I also leave the bike at home when it's raining so weatherproofing is not really an issue for me..
     
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  8. fin azvandi

    fin azvandi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 12, 2011
    South Bend, IN
    There's a basket/crate mounted over the rear wheel on my bike, I commute when it's not raining/snowing and like to bring the camera as often as possible.

    For just camera + lens it goes in a neoprene pouch and then in a largish internal pocket of my backpack. If I want to bring a bag just for camera gear (more lenses), I have a Tenba padded insert that goes inside a small messenger bag.
     
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  9. Colin Griffiths

    Colin Griffiths New to Mu-43

    I do a lot of cycling, almost every day. Like Ray S I usually just take an LX5 in an old CCS case and it fits in a jersey pocket or a gym bag on my back. If however, I'm going out on a photography specific bike ride, I'll carry a Deuter cycling rucksack with my GF1 and a couple of lenses or alternatively a Lowepro messenger bag depending on the nature of the ride and the bike I choose to ride. I've always been wary of carrying camera gear directly on the bike itself because of vibration and shock (but I accept I might be worrying unnecessarily).
     
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  10. soundimageplus

    soundimageplus Mu-43 Top Veteran

    782
    Feb 2, 2010
    Worcestershire
    I did once photograph a well known cycle route here in the UK with a Leica M8 slung over my shoulder and two lenses in a small camera bag fastened to the bag rack with an elasticated strap. Since it was pan flat and traffic free I felt it was relatively risk free and so it proved.

    I'm currently trying to come up with some way of fixing my GH2 to the handlebars to shoot video. I'm interested in some very fast descents with a 7-14mm zoom. However I'm having problems finding something, cheap light and robust enough. I keep having these visions of the camera flying off followed shortly afterwards by me!!
     
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  11. I reckon if you could hang it off the side of one of the front forks with a UWA lens it would look pretty cool.
     
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  12. soundimageplus

    soundimageplus Mu-43 Top Veteran

    782
    Feb 2, 2010
    Worcestershire
    Yes, I've got visions of videoing facing front and back and as you say from the front forks. Then edit it together with split screen. Its finding something that doesn't destroy the camera, the bike and me thats the problem.
     
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  13. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    I used to have a very small ball head and a Manfrotto super clamp that I attached an Xpan to. Worked a treat.

    Gordon
     
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  14. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    The best cycling videos I've seen have been from small helmet cams. The problem with bike mounted cameras is the bicycle vibrates and shakes like crazy unless you're on a nearly perfect road (we don't have any of those around here!). And also, your handlebars are not generally pointed where you're actually going, with counter-steering on high speed descents and what not, but your head is almost always pointed in the direction you're headed unless things have gone very very badly wrong! Your body absorbs a lot of vibration and small hits though through knees and elbows and helmet cams can often produce really excellent videos. I recall a video that Levi Leipheimer made on a training ride out in his northern California hills of a fast twisty descent - frightening as hell but very good video quality. And it was a helmet cam.

    -Ray
     
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  15. At the very least if you had front suspension which I guess is pretty much universal now, it could be mounted at the top of the forks where the suspension will absorb some of the shock. The Oly 9-18mm would be a safer bet for a lens because you could put a UV filter on it. I'm pretty sure I've seen something like this before where you get the rotating wheel in the shot.
     
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  16. soundimageplus

    soundimageplus Mu-43 Top Veteran

    782
    Feb 2, 2010
    Worcestershire
    I found it. [ame=http://vimeo.com/8939902]Levi Leipheimer Descending Pine Flat Road on Vimeo[/ame]

    Thats my kind of cycling. Its the other direction I have trouble with!!
     
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  17. John M Flores

    John M Flores Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 7, 2011
    Somerville, NJ
    Knock wood, but I've had no trouble carrying and mounting cameras on all manner of bicycles. The most protected place IMO is on your person - either in a bag or slung over your shoulder. Your body is basically a shock absorber for the camera. I've also had luck carrying a dSLR in a handlebar bag with a small towel as cushion. And I also mounted a Ricoh GX100 to my downtube with a homegrown clamp:

    3260517149_5ed7eb7f6d_z.
    Going to the Sun Road, Glacier National Park, MT by john m flores, on Flickr

    In any kind of mounting situation, the two key factors are weight and the length of the mounting unit. A dSLR with a big piece of glass mounted on the end of a long arm will bob and sway horribly unless it is suitably braced. The little Ricoh, on the other hand, was perfect for mounting, particularly with the 19mm wide angle adapter and the built-in intervalometer.

    I suspect that M43 cameras, with fewer moving parts and thus fewer things to be knocked out of alignment and such, are particularly well-suited to bicycle travel.

    BTW, anyone have any "panda" portraits?

    2714734937_f79975fd8f_z.
    Two of my favorite things by john m flores, on Flickr
     
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  18. nursenicole

    nursenicole Mu-43 Regular

    76
    Feb 24, 2011
    boston
    wow! thank you everyone :smile: i was feeling a little overly-cautious i guess about using my crumpler over the shoulder as usual but i guess it could work. or maybe a handlebar bag.

    anyway, you've given me some good ideas and more importantly a little more confidence that i probably won't smash my camera while i'm out riding. thanks again!
     
  19. Colin Griffiths

    Colin Griffiths New to Mu-43

    How about:

    Bicycle Bike Handlebar Mount Holder For Digital Camera | eBay UK

    I just searched for "handlebar camera mount". I think that vibration would be a real problem though. You might have to experiment with your tyre pressures! Helmet mounts are available and might be the better option.
     
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