Best Memory Card....

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Dogdaze, Jun 24, 2013.

  1. Dogdaze

    Dogdaze Mu-43 Regular

    29
    Jun 19, 2013
    New York
    Charlotte
    I would like to know what memory card most of you use.
    I have a Lumix DMC G3 camera.
    The card that I am now using (which was a recommendation by a sales person at Best Buy ) is a 32GB Digital Film, 1080p HD, 32kG SCHC/XC...
    Thanks,
    Charlotte
     
  2. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    I use the SanDisk Extreme 32 GB cards in my OM-D EM-5:

    Amazon.com: SanDisk Extreme 32 GB SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 45MB/s SDSDX-032G-AFFP: Electronics

    and have found them satisfactory. Note that I do not shoot video.

    I also have Sony 16 GB cards:

    Amazon.com: Sony 16GB SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Memory Card (SF16UX/TQ): Computers & Accessories

    which work well. The SanDisk seems to read/write faster but neither causes a "wait and cuss" situation.

    I occasionally shoot in 'rock 'n roll' mode (9 frames per second) and the buffer clears very quickly with the SanDisk.

    HTH

    Regards,

    Jim
     
  3. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    Various. I have a 16 and a 32 GB SanDisk ultra class 10, and just added three more 32GB Samsung UHS-1/class 10 cards for holiday peace of mind - heading to Ecuador in a few weeks, and I shoot a lot on vacation. Plus the cards are getting crazy cheap.
     
  4. Nordiquefan

    Nordiquefan Mu-43 Regular

    77
    Mar 12, 2013
  5. STR

    STR Mu-43 Veteran

    222
    May 16, 2013
    Aside from speed, which is always printed on the label, there really isn't much difference between SD cards. Even the off-brand cards use name-brand memory (there's only a half-dozen makers globally, largest being Micron, Samsung and Kingston). They just resell memory bought on the open market, and are often a generation or two behind in tech (which is why they were available at cheap prices in the first place), but aside from being slower are identical to the name brand cards.
     
  6. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    Yep, me too; I tend to buy the larger cards to have the capacity but don't fill 'em up before rotating to the next card, since prices have fallen over the last few years. My brick 'n mortar Nikon dealer charged $50 per megabyte on CF cards in 2006 :eek:.

    Of course the other school of thought goes that the more cards one uses the more risk one incurs.

    I can see the point - but still like to swap out cards so as to not lose an entire day's shooting should a card go bad. The only card I have personally seen go bad belonged to a co-worker who pulled the card out of the camera during a read/write operation. Most of the photos on the card were recoverable using SanDisk software.

    Regards,

    Jim
     
  7. Biro

    Biro Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 8, 2011
    Jersey Shore
    Steve
    I use SanDisk Extreme or Extreme Pro cards almost exclusively. I like the 95 mb/sec version, as long as the camera can handle the UHS-1 protocol. I tend to limit card size to 16gb. But that's just me.
     
  8. jnewell

    jnewell Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 23, 2011
    Boston, MA
    I'm sure you're right but I keep buying SanDisk. One other thing is that there are counterfeit cards for sale, so it is worth buying from a reputable vendor. I would be particularly careful about non-Amazon vendors selling through Amazon.
     
  9. jnewell

    jnewell Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 23, 2011
    Boston, MA
    I found that the UHS-1 cards, which I believe are also sold as 95mb/s, have write speeds significantly faster than I get with the 45mb/s cards on the EM-5. My G5 and earlier GX-1, on the other hand, maxed out with the 45mb/s cards. Still, since the service life of a card at this point may be longer than the expected time that you'll own a particular camera, it may be worth buying more card speed than your camera can take advantage of currently. YMMV.
     
  10. merosen

    merosen Mu-43 Regular

    128
    Jun 14, 2012
    Somerville (Boston), MA
    Mark
    Been using the Sony cards mentioned above.
    Works well in an E-M5
    And the price is good
     
  11. BigTam

    BigTam Mu-43 Top Veteran

    773
    Mar 19, 2012
    Dortmund, Germany
    Ron
    Sandisk Extreme Pro 95MB/s 16 GB for my M5. The 30MB/s cards I had before go into my X100, since I only do single shots with it.

    The fast card works well with the high-speed buffer.
     
  12. Dogdaze

    Dogdaze Mu-43 Regular

    29
    Jun 19, 2013
    New York
    Charlotte
    Memory Cards...

    A big thank you to you all for all your input. Great info!
    Now...being that I am a newbie not only to this Forum...but still learning about my G3 camera.
    Do any of you ever delete images on your cards? Did I hear any gasps out there??
    I took a class about 10 months ago and the instructor said never delete images. It sounds like you all have LOTS of cards. That instructor could not help me with any of my camera settings. He had a Nikon and Canon...and others in the class had the same...I was on my own. Oh well...just glad I'm HERE!
    Thanks again....
    Charlotte
     
  13. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    Hi Charlotte!

    Normally I don't delete images "on the fly" - I wait until I've transferred the entire contents (good shots and bad) to a computer and then I format the card in the camera.

    However that is just a personal preference. Many others will, I'm sure, relate that they routinely "chimp" while shooting and delete unwanted images.

    I use the electronic viewfinder on my OM-D rather than the screen to frame shots (with the occasional exception when the camera is mounted on a tripod) and I only review the shots to check the lighting. Once I'm confident that I've got the lighting where I want it I don't review each shot as it is taken. Again, just a personal preference.

    I would note that, as far as I am aware, no card manufacturer recommends against deleting individual photographs from a card when in the camera and that the camera manufacturers all (again, as far as I am aware) provide a button or other method to perform the delete task. From that one might readily assume that both the card manufacturers and the camera manufacturers condone the practice.

    The instructor may have had in mind that his students were beginning photographers (or at least beginning digital photographers) and that it might be preferable for neophytes to review their photos on a large screen to check their work rather than go by what can be seen on a camera screen.

    I think experienced photographers tend to have multiple cards because occasionally there will be a "daily deal" type of sale on Amazon or B&H or Adorama or such and folks take advantage of the opportunity. Over time the inventory in one's kit tends to grow.

    (As an example, earlier this year there was a deal on the Sony 16mb cards offered at something like 2 for $24 U.S.; I bought four. Of course one has to be certain that the cards offered are of the desired read/write speed and, to avoid counterfeited cards, that the offer is from a legitimate reseller.)

    There is another school of thought, now that the price of cards has dropped: that one never deletes the files on the card. One transfers the photos to one's computer and then simply files the card away as a backup, much like one might have done years ago with computer floppy or ZIP disks.

    I don't subscribe to that idea myself; I'm not certain about the long term storage viability of the cards and remote and desktop storage have become relatively inexpensive. However if one were shooting events such as weddings, sporting events, etc. on a regular basis it might be logical to transfer the photos and then label and file the card as a sort of "backup to the backup".

    Sorry for the length of the reply, sometimes I get a bit carried away :biggrin:.

    I'm sure you'll get numerous replies with good information in them.


    Regards,

    Jim
     
  14. BigTam

    BigTam Mu-43 Top Veteran

    773
    Mar 19, 2012
    Dortmund, Germany
    Ron
    Jim makes some good points. Personally, I find it easier and faster to weed out the bad shots on a computer, rather than in camera.

    I copy the card's contents to my PC, sync my PC to my wife's (so I have 2 copies) and backup the photos to an external drive as well. I have over 40 years experience in IT, so I may be a little paranoid :)

    After that, the card goes back into the camera and I reformat it.

    Sounds like a lot of work, but it's very quick: I use FreeFileSync, which only copies the new or changed files.
     
  15. Dogdaze

    Dogdaze Mu-43 Regular

    29
    Jun 19, 2013
    New York
    Charlotte
    Thank you....

    The instructor that I mentioned told us NOT to delete...he referred it to
    taking a negative and tearing it in half. It damages the card. He was told by one of his professors in college (studied photography). I had my camera 1 month then. So that's why I asked.....AND thank you for all your input....good information.
    Charlotte
     
  16. merosen

    merosen Mu-43 Regular

    128
    Jun 14, 2012
    Somerville (Boston), MA
    Mark
    similar thread on FM
    my response:
    and never delete anything on your hard drive :rolleyes:

    personally I've been deleting in camera for years, I've never hard a card error or an unreadable card.
    I always format the card in camera after transfer.
     
  17. STR

    STR Mu-43 Veteran

    222
    May 16, 2013
    Problem with shady dealers isn't unreliability, they still have to get their chips from the same places as everyone else. However, counterfeits are often mislabeled. They'll say 16GB Class 10 on the outside, but pop it in and you only have 2GB of Class 2 free. On rare occasion, I've heard of them formatting the cards to say 16GB (or whatever), but corrupting files when you go over the actual memory (say, 2GB) because the card is trying to store files in pages that don't exist.

    SanDisk is fine. The top flash memory chipmakers are SanDisk, Samsung, Toshiba, SK Hynix, and Micron Technologies, though the latter concentrates more on the high speed flash used on PC solid state drives. As far as I can tell, Kingston doesn't fab their own chips, but that doesn't mean they're any less good.