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Battery Age?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by Harvey Melvin Richards, Jul 29, 2016.

  1. Harvey Melvin Richards

    Harvey Melvin Richards Photo Posting Junkie

    Feb 15, 2014
    Southwest Utah
    I have 5 Olympus BLS-5 batteries. Two will no longer take a charge, 1 has a 2011 date on it, the other has a 2013 date. The first camera that I purchased that uses these batteries was in late February 2014, so somone sent me old batteries. Of my other 3 batteries, one is mid 2014, the others are mid 2015. I never paid attention to the dates until my batteries would no longer charge. So I purchased a new battery from Amazon that arrived today, the date is 2014-08-06, so it has been sitting on a shelf for 2 years. Should I send this battery pack and request a newer one?
     
  2. PacNWMike

    PacNWMike Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Dec 5, 2014
    Salish Sea
    guess?
    I would
     
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  3. Brian Beezley

    Brian Beezley Mu-43 All-Pro

    From an industrial white paper entitled "Li-Ion Battery Best Practices":

    6.7 Battery Aging
    Aging of Li-Ion batteries is an issue that is often ignored. A Li-Ion battery in use typically lasts be-
    tween 2-3 years, whether it is used or not. Aging starts from the date of manufacture. The speed by
    which the Lithium Ion chemistry ages is governed by temperature and amount of charge in the cell,
    and results in a capacity loss manifested by increased internal resistance caused by oxidation. This
    process is irreversible. Eventually, the cell resistance reaches a point where the battery can no longer
    deliver the stored energy although the battery may still have ample charge.

    I would return the old battery, Harvey, and insist on one manufactured in 2016.

    Brian
     
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  4. Harvey Melvin Richards

    Harvey Melvin Richards Photo Posting Junkie

    Feb 15, 2014
    Southwest Utah
    Thanks Brian, interesting read. I have a Bosch cordless drill with lithium batteries and it's 12 years old and still holds a charge very well. But it will probably die now that I have said this.
     
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  5. Brian Beezley

    Brian Beezley Mu-43 All-Pro

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  6. SVQuant

    SVQuant Mu-43 Top Veteran

    851
    Sep 20, 2015
    SF Bay Area, California, USA
    Sameer
    I believe that the BLS-5 got replaced with the BLS-50 and may no longer be in production. FWIW, I bought 2 batteries from this eBay listing and they come with a 2015-07-11 manufacturing date which is newer than the one I got from Amazon (and cheaper to boot). There are now a couple of other sellers from China selling BLS-50 with images showing the same manufacturing date.

    [Edit]
    The original battery which came with my Nikon D-40 in 2008 still works fine. I have already had more issues with Oly batteries in a year than I had with this one in 8.
     
  7. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    That "White Paper" has no publication date (may not reflect current battery technology), and is nothing more than a compilation of stuff found on the internet.
     
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  8. MJL

    MJL Mu-43 Regular

    199
    Feb 24, 2016
    Katikati, New Zealand
    Marinus
    Totally agree, it is hard to dig down to the bottom of what is true and what is not. Was not the case 15-20 years ago when the internet was in its infancy but these days every Tom, Di ck and Harry can post whatever they feel like and spout nonsense. Need only to look at all the hatred on the web and/or the difficulty government bodies have trying to stamp out the stream of information between those who are involved in illegal activities. ("dark web")

    Li-ion batteries can be stored for a long time provided it is done properly: at a temperature of 4-6 C and a charge between 40 and 60%. I've got laptop batteries that are 10+ years old and still holding 80-90% charge. Panasonic batteries are the highest rated and live the longest.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2016
  9. Brian Beezley

    Brian Beezley Mu-43 All-Pro

    Yes, it's consistent with other sources I've found on the internet, mostly technical papers published by various battery manufacturers. At one time I intended to design a product using li-ion or NiMH cells so I did a fair amount of research on the properties of both.

    I like that particular paper because it collates a lot of information in one place. If you believe something in it isn't true, let's hear it.

    Brian
     
  10. Brian Beezley

    Brian Beezley Mu-43 All-Pro

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  11. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    My dad's E-3 had a bunch of batteries... one Lenmar was completely unusable; camera would shut down after a few seconds.
    It was probably only 2-3 years old, but it may have been stored completely drained or otherwise abused.

    I've got a couple Dell laptops where the batteries are showing loss of 50% or more of their original capacity, but they are well over 5 years old. One is user regularly and I try to keep it around 50% charged.
    And I've seen more that have failed completely.
    Laptops have a big problem where they can get very warm if left plugged in, damaging the battery... more so as the battery will be fully charged.
    Many laptops now have options to turn off charging with a hotkey (Dell) while powered on and plugged in, or a BIOS setting to avoid charging to 100% while running (HP, but it still charges to 95%, can't limit it).

    And I had a TomTom GPS lose most of its capacity in less than 7 years, but the dash of a car is obviously a hash environment.
    My friend's TomTom battery died much quicker, and the GPS was useless as it wouldn't power on even when plugged in until the battery was replaced.

    On my E-M1, I've had 2 progo batteries swell so as to be unusable, but have not noticed loss of capacity on any of the 5 batteries I've used, including the swollen ones.
     
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  12. Harvey Melvin Richards

    Harvey Melvin Richards Photo Posting Junkie

    Feb 15, 2014
    Southwest Utah
    What is considered to be the proper recharging of the Oly batteries? Recharge when down a little, or run it til it quits and then recharge? I've been following rechargeable batteries for 20+ years, and I have never seen any consistent absolutes.
     
  13. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Lithium batteries get hotter when charging between 0-30% and 90-100%.
    So I try to swap batteries when they hit the 1/3 mark.

    I think it's probably more important to not store them somewhere hot, esp. when fully charged.
     
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  14. Brian Beezley

    Brian Beezley Mu-43 All-Pro

    No wonder since optimal recharging is different for NiCd, NiMH, and Li-ion, the battery technologies of the past 20 years. The first two have memory issues (capacity degrades if you don't fully discharge) but can be trickle charged. Li-ion has no memory issue but degrades if trickle charged. The instructions for the Vivitar rechargeable shaver I just got (yes, Vivitar!) tell me to recharge only when fully discharged and then don't charge for more than a certain time period. I thought all modern stuff used Li-ion, but this sounds more like NiCd or NiMH with a primitive charge circuit. Li-ion chargers use smart IC controllers that limit the charge rate and stop charging when the battery is fully charged.

    Brian
     
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  15. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    for what its worth my batteries on my GF1 and GH1 (they are interchangable) date from some time back around 2012 and are still holding a charge nicely. All three (even the $20noname brand).

    I seem to recall reading that what really effected Li-ION batteries was storage at charge.
    a good read:
    http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries

    dunno about sending them back ... totally your call
     
  16. hazwing

    hazwing Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 25, 2012
    Australia
    From my understanding deep discharges are more likely to reduce li-ion battery life in the long term
     
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  17. Harvey Melvin Richards

    Harvey Melvin Richards Photo Posting Junkie

    Feb 15, 2014
    Southwest Utah
    It's already back, credit received and new one ordered.
     
  18. WendyK

    WendyK Super Moderator

    Feb 28, 2014
    Northern Virginia
    Wendy
    Yes. I bought a BLS-50 for my E-M10 after a non-OEM BLS-5 equivalent battery ceased holding a charge after almost exactly a year. Harvey, it seems like I get a lot more shots with the BLS-50 than I ever got with the BLS-5, FWIW. I haven't done any testing because my one remaining BLS-5 is 2.5 years old and it wouldn't be a fair test, but the difference was very noticeable.
     
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  19. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    The BLS-50 is rated at 1175 mAh and the BLS-5 is 1150 mAh. This is a difference in energy storage capacity of a little over 2%. A noticeable difference in shots would not be due to inherent differences between the two battery models.
     
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  20. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Fwiw, lithium-polymer (Li-Po) batteries supposedly have less aging issues, but are slightly lower in capacity.
    (Versus lithium-ion (Li-ion))

    Some phones are now using Li-Po batteries.
     
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