Basic Olympus Video Settings?

Joined
Jun 4, 2014
Messages
1,962
Location
Maryland
Real Name
Loren
I’m trying to add video to my repertoire. I figure I’ll mainly be shooting short clips (nothing longer than a handful of seconds, to be stitched in with still images in post processing) of wildlife, panning across landscapes, and occasionally people. Maybe someday I’ll try Vlogging. I’m trying to decide on my basic video settings for my E-M1’s MkII and E-M1X, but am not sure if I understand all the implications of my choices. Since shutter speed should be fixed to one over twice the frame rate, I figure I only have two options…

One would be using manual mode to control both aperture and shutter speed. When I do this it appears that auto ISO is not possible (or maybe that’s another setting?). The benefit to this is full control over exposure, but the disadvantage is that I cannot easily and fluidly adjust to rapidly changing lighting conditions.

The other option is to shoot in shutter priority mode, so that aperture is controlled by the camera. It appears that auto ISO is the only ISO setting allowed in this mode (or again, is this another setting issue?). On the positive side, the camera should automatically adjust to changing lighting conditions. The disadvantage is lack of control, as the camera will control both aperture and ISO. I’ve programmed myself to never allow the camera to control more than one setting, but in this case it appears I would have no choice.​

My main lenses of choice will be either the 12-100 for its dual IS, or the Pro primes, depending on my light gathering and depth of field requirements. I’ll also be using the 300 Pro for wildlife video. I have the 12-50 EZ kit lens (my first ever lens), but I never use it and don’t figure the electronic zoom will be something I’ll ever use. I don’t intend to be zooming in and out very often in video, if ever. I have a variable ND filter I can screw on the front for shooting in bright conditions, if I don’t want to greatly reduce aperture to compensate instead. The ND filter gives me a little bit more exposure control.

As for video quality and frame rate, I’ve mostly been focusing on the 4K options (or should I be less dismissive of 1080p?). The frame rate options are fewer than with 1080p, but I figure if I’m going to shoot video, I should use high-quality settings. As a matter of course, I would use the highest frame rate (30 FPS) when possible. I have all the 4K frame rates programmed into the SCP. I was thinking that I could shoot at 25 or 24 FPS if the lighting gets a little dim. That is a very minimal solution, however, and I am not sure if it is worth it. So, the only real recourse is to raise ISO. How high do people tend to raise ISO (or set their maximum auto ISO limit) and still have it look good on 4K video? Is ETTR possible or advisable with video? I’d like to learn how to color grade eventually, and will then start using the log400 picture mode, but that’s for a later date. Until I tackle post processing video, that setting well be kept off.

For audio, I have a shotgun mic, Olympus LS-P4 PCM recorder, and a lav mic. I think I have the camera settings for those figured out.

Lastly, I was thinking that with firmware 3.0, C-AF is now probably good enough to use for moving subjects, MF if the subject is static. Do you agree? Is there ever a scenario where S-AF would be used in video, particularly over manual focus? Should I stop down aperture a certain amount in order to ensure enough depth of field?

Am I missing something? What do people find looks best for them? Any advice would be appreciated.
 

wjiang

Mu-43 Legend
Joined
Sep 7, 2013
Messages
7,568
Location
Christchurch, New Zealand
These bodies have much nicer video than previous Olympus offerings. The DCI 4K is noticeably better quality than the 1080p IPB options, but if you're not doing much editing, UHD 4K is still better than the 1080p IPB - it's also a way more common display format than DCI 4K. Haven't compared the UHD 4K to the high bitrate 1080p All-I, however. You can downsample the 4K to reduce noise, if required - downsampled 4K will look sharper with less noise than native 1080p.

One thing that 1080p IPB has going for it is that you can do 2x slow motion at 60 FPS by slowing it down to 30 FPS in post. It's also got a tigher crop factor so may be of advantage for long range wildlife.

I'm using the free version of Da Vinci Resolve for editing, which is restricted to UHD 4K timelines (you have to pay for higher resolutions like DCI 4K). I don't even have a 4K monitor so have skipped capturing 4K for now, but I can definitely see uses for downscaling/cropping 4K for more post-processing flexibility.

I tend to use shutter priority with auto-ISO - you'll find shallow DoF is way less relevant for video. ETTR is not adviseable - you're effectively shooting in JPEG so there's very little room to do PP, especially for highlight recovery. You'll need some headroom in case anything in the scene changes, e.g. a bird with white plumage appears in frame.

I've been using OM-Log400 with the Rec.709 preview enabled. Olympus provide a LUT for Da Vinci Resolve so basic colour grading is trivial (I don't have to do any by default with the LUT turned on). If you aren't dealing with high dynamic range the Flat profile would be better as it will result in less noise. There's Rec.709 preview and a LUT for that as well.

The C-AF is definitely now good enough for almost all use cases at normal distances. If the subject is going to move even a little I'd use it over MF unless you are good at focus pulling. For static subjects I would use S-AF for initial acquisition and MF for fine tuning. I haven't tried the C-AF for long range stuff - I suspect you're better off with MF for that. As for DoF, you're probably fine with the f/4 lenses but f/1.2 is going to be challenging. I haven't tried with anything faster than my f/2.8 zooms TBH.

Why don't you do some shooting and let's compare notes?
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 4, 2014
Messages
1,962
Location
Maryland
Real Name
Loren
These bodies have much nicer video than previous Olympus offerings. The DCI 4K is noticeably better quality than the 1080p IPB options, but if you're not doing much editing, UHD 4K is still better than the 1080p IPB - it's also a way more common display format than DCI 4K. Haven't compared the UHD 4K to the high bitrate 1080p All-I, however. You can downsample the 4K to reduce noise, if required - downsampled 4K will look sharper with less noise than native 1080p.

One thing that 1080p IPB has going for it is that you can do 2x slow motion at 60 FPS by slowing it down to 30 FPS in post. It's also got a tigher crop factor so may be of advantage for long range wildlife.

I'm using the free version of Da Vinci Resolve for editing, which is restricted to UHD 4K timelines (you have to pay for higher resolutions like DCI 4K). I don't even have a 4K monitor so have skipped capturing 4K for now, but I can definitely see uses for downscaling/cropping 4K for more post-processing flexibility.

I tend to use shutter priority with auto-ISO - you'll find shallow DoF is way less relevant for video. ETTR is not adviseable - you're effectively shooting in JPEG so there's very little room to do PP, especially for highlight recovery. You'll need some headroom in case anything in the scene changes, e.g. a bird with white plumage appears in frame.

I've been using OM-Log400 with the Rec.709 preview enabled. Olympus provide a LUT for Da Vinci Resolve so basic colour grading is trivial (I don't have to do any by default with the LUT turned on). If you aren't dealing with high dynamic range the Flat profile would be better as it will result in less noise. There's Rec.709 preview and a LUT for that as well.

The C-AF is definitely now good enough for almost all use cases at normal distances. If the subject is going to move even a little I'd use it over MF unless you are good at focus pulling. For static subjects I would use S-AF for initial acquisition and MF for fine tuning. I haven't tried the C-AF for long range stuff - I suspect you're better off with MF for that. As for DoF, you're probably fine with the f/4 lenses but f/1.2 is going to be challenging. I haven't tried with anything faster than my f/2.8 zooms TBH.

Why don't you do some shooting and let's compare notes?
Good stuff @wjiang , thanks! Yes, I have started doing some shooting, so I’ll be happy to keep this conversation going.
 

kevinparis

Cantankerous Scotsman
Joined
Feb 12, 2010
Messages
3,912
Location
Gent, Belgium
I am currently experimenting with a setup that uses the c1,c2,c3 setting on the mode dial
I have them set up as follows

C1 - 4K @ 24fps, highest bitrate, manual exposure 1/50 @ f4, iso 200, flat or log 400 profile
C2 - same as C1 except 1080p
C3 - again HD but at 60fps and 1/120 shutter speed

This allows quick switching to a known setup.

I don't intend to deliver in 4K, so I will shoot with the c1 setting when I know I am going to zoom/reframe/pan etc in post.

While shooting I then basically use the variable ND as my exposure adjustment

Cheers
K
 

DanS

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Mar 8, 2016
Messages
1,760
I shoot a lot of video, and my take on settings is as follows:

I generally recommend going full manual, as even the best camera's on the market tend to throw a wrench in the gears at the worst possible moment when you let them think.

Step 1 is to pic your frame rate. If you are going for a cinematic look, shoot 24 fps. If you are in a PAL country shoot 25 fps, or 30 for an NTSC country. 50 and 60 fps are good for high motion shots or when you want 1/2 speed slow-mo. Pal vs NTSC is all but out dated, but a lot of people subconsciously pick up on it and it throws them off.

Step 2 is to set your shutter speed based on your frame rate. Stay as close as you can to the 180 degree rule as you can, unless you are intentionally violating it for artistic purposes.

Step 3 is to set your aperture and ISO to get proper depth of field and exposure. This can be finicky, as some times to have to use a less than ideal setting for one to get a good shot. Generally I favor setting aperture first and then adjusting ISO to get an appropriate exposure. The only time I will violate this is when I think ISO is getting to high and will lead to a distracting amount or noise.

For focus mode I also recommend manual, as most camera even the gh5 tends to switch focus to quickly, and unnecessarily. This can be jarring and distracting to viewers. If you have a limited number of moving things in frame, like a single person/object continuous AF can work, but it's something you need to test for yourself with the camera you plan to use.
 

number17

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Jan 19, 2011
Messages
176
Sorry to hijack the thread a little bit ... but I have noticed the video captured by EM-10.2 is pretty terrible every time my camera moves, especially when I try to do a panning motion there's a very serious 'jello effect', no matter what I do with the IS setting.

Is this normal? Is there anything I can do on the setting to minimize / get rid of this?

And should I expect the video quality to be better on my EM1.1?

I am a 99% still shooter (thus Olympus instead of Panasonic) so it doesn't bother me as much, but I just want to know if there's something I am setting up wrong on the cameras for video.


Thanks in advance!
 

DanS

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Mar 8, 2016
Messages
1,760
Sorry to hijack the thread a little bit ... but I have noticed the video captured by EM-10.2 is pretty terrible every time my camera moves, especially when I try to do a panning motion there's a very serious 'jello effect', no matter what I do with the IS setting.
This is common for most IBIS. unless you have the golden touch, you can usually get better results by turning ibis off, and stabilizing in post.
 

wjiang

Mu-43 Legend
Joined
Sep 7, 2013
Messages
7,568
Location
Christchurch, New Zealand
Sorry to hijack the thread a little bit ... but I have noticed the video captured by EM-10.2 is pretty terrible every time my camera moves, especially when I try to do a panning motion there's a very serious 'jello effect', no matter what I do with the IS setting.

Is this normal? Is there anything I can do on the setting to minimize / get rid of this?

And should I expect the video quality to be better on my EM1.1?

I am a 99% still shooter (thus Olympus instead of Panasonic) so it doesn't bother me as much, but I just want to know if there's something I am setting up wrong on the cameras for video.


Thanks in advance!
The electronic shutter in both of those models scan quite slowly, giving noticeable rolling shutter issues like what you described with the IBIS. The E-M1 Mk2 has a much faster scanning shutter which reduces the problem quite a bit.
 

number17

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Jan 19, 2011
Messages
176
Thanks ... so if I turn IBIS off, the jello effect should go away? Or no? Cause I haven't noticed any difference even when I turn IBIS off.

I also picked up a GX85 recently ... I suppose that will be my camera when I want to shoot video
 

wjiang

Mu-43 Legend
Joined
Sep 7, 2013
Messages
7,568
Location
Christchurch, New Zealand
Thanks ... so if I turn IBIS off, the jello effect should go away? Or no? Cause I haven't noticed any difference even when I turn IBIS off.

I also picked up a GX85 recently ... I suppose that will be my camera when I want to shoot video
It will help, but if you pan too quickly it will still have jello from normal rolling shutter effects. The IBIS just aggravates it.
 
Joined
Jun 4, 2014
Messages
1,962
Location
Maryland
Real Name
Loren
I am currently experimenting with a setup that uses the c1,c2,c3 setting on the mode dial
I have them set up as follows

C1 - 4K @ 24fps, highest bitrate, manual exposure 1/50 @ f4, iso 200, flat or log 400 profile
C2 - same as C1 except 1080p
C3 - again HD but at 60fps and 1/120 shutter speed

This allows quick switching to a known setup.

I don't intend to deliver in 4K, so I will shoot with the c1 setting when I know I am going to zoom/reframe/pan etc in post.

While shooting I then basically use the variable ND as my exposure adjustment

Cheers
K
Most of my custom modes are utilized for stills shooting. However I have an idea a custom video mode that is defaulted to shoot MyClips with the video button and time lapse with the shutter button.

A couple questions:

C1: Why not 1/48 shutter speed to match the frame rate? I know it’s negligible in this case, but is there an intent behind it?

C2: Since C1 would be downscaled to 1080P, is the purpose for this mode just if you don’t want to downscale? Is there a reason why you chose not to differentiate C2 from C1 by choosing 30fps?

Thanks for your reply.
 
Joined
Jun 4, 2014
Messages
1,962
Location
Maryland
Real Name
Loren
I shoot a lot of video, and my take on settings is as follows:

I generally recommend going full manual, as even the best camera's on the market tend to throw a wrench in the gears at the worst possible moment when you let them think.

Step 1 is to pic your frame rate. If you are going for a cinematic look, shoot 24 fps. If you are in a PAL country shoot 25 fps, or 30 for an NTSC country. 50 and 60 fps are good for high motion shots or when you want 1/2 speed slow-mo. Pal vs NTSC is all but out dated, but a lot of people subconsciously pick up on it and it throws them off.

Step 2 is to set your shutter speed based on your frame rate. Stay as close as you can to the 180 degree rule as you can, unless you are intentionally violating it for artistic purposes.

Step 3 is to set your aperture and ISO to get proper depth of field and exposure. This can be finicky, as some times to have to use a less than ideal setting for one to get a good shot. Generally I favor setting aperture first and then adjusting ISO to get an appropriate exposure. The only time I will violate this is when I think ISO is getting to high and will lead to a distracting amount or noise.

For focus mode I also recommend manual, as most camera even the gh5 tends to switch focus to quickly, and unnecessarily. This can be jarring and distracting to viewers. If you have a limited number of moving things in frame, like a single person/object continuous AF can work, but it's something you need to test for yourself with the camera you plan to use.
Thanks Dan!

Manual mode is definitely more in line with my way of thinking. However, the other day I was trying to shoot video of a beautiful Japanese ryokan (traditional resort hotel, I guess is a way to describe it), and I was foiled by panning across both bright windows and the darker interior. I didn’t think there was any way I could easily deal with it in full manual mode. Maybe the log400 picture mode?

Your sequencing of the settings makes sense to me. So you don’t believe in allowing ISO to go auto… How high are you personally willing to set ISO?

I haven’t considered PAL versus NTSC, so I will have to investigate that. Right now I am living in Germany, but I’m a US citizen and travel the world a lot.

What is the effect if I set my shutter speed above or below the 180° FPS rule?

The more I think about it, considering the types of video I plan to mostly do, manual focusing does make more sense. However, since I use only Pro lenses, I have the focus clutch available to me, so I figure I can set video for C-AF as the default, and switch to manual focus whenever I want.
 

kevinparis

Cantankerous Scotsman
Joined
Feb 12, 2010
Messages
3,912
Location
Gent, Belgium
Most of my custom modes are utilized for stills shooting. However I have an idea a custom video mode that is defaulted to shoot MyClips with the video button and time lapse with the shutter button.

A couple questions:

C1: Why not 1/48 shutter speed to match the frame rate? I know it’s negligible in this case, but is there an intent behind it?

C2: Since C1 would be downscaled to 1080P, is the purpose for this mode just if you don’t want to downscale? Is there a reason why you chose not to differentiate C2 from C1 by choosing 30fps?

Thanks for your reply.
Loren

Good point on the 1/48th. I didn’t spot that option. I suspect the custom modes are designed primarily for stills set ups. Some of the video features seem to be tricky to incorporate.

The purpose of my c2 confit was as you said for those times where I would use the footage as shot. Chose 24fps to be consistent with the c1 footage

Cheers
K
 

DanS

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Mar 8, 2016
Messages
1,760
Manual mode is definitely more in line with my way of thinking. However, the other day I was trying to shoot video of a beautiful Japanese ryokan (traditional resort hotel, I guess is a way to describe it), and I was foiled by panning across both bright windows and the darker interior. I didn’t think there was any way I could easily deal with it in full manual mode. Maybe the log400 picture mode?
This is one of those things that takes a little time to learn, and also to be ok with. One of the things you can do is shoot at a lower iso so the windows don't get blown out, or are just barely blown out. Then you can manually adjust the exposure in post.

The other thing to remember is that you eyes and mind will expect the windows to be blown out. Think about how you react if you are sitting in a dark room and then someone pulls the curtains open and its a bright summer day outside.

Your sequencing of the settings makes sense to me. So you don’t believe in allowing ISO to go auto… How high are you personally willing to set ISO?
I have no problem going to 1600 on my GH5 without NR in post. I've gone as far as 6400 and then used NR in post. I'm usually between 200 and 400. You subject matter will be the biggest thing that determines how high you can go. If you don't need to maintain a lot of fine detail, then you can go higher and use NR in post, else you will need to change your camera set-up or get lights.

What is the effect if I set my shutter speed above or below the 180° FPS rule?
this is a little long, but it's a good synopsis on the subject.

 
Joined
Dec 5, 2012
Messages
380
Location
Austin, TX
Real Name
M@
A variable ND filter is your friend when shooting outdoors.

I've shot some video with my E-M5 MkII, and given you can't set ISO to auto in video (and adjusting it while recording can only be done by tap tap tapping buttons on the screen), a variable ND filter to control exposure while shooting outdoors is relatively easy to use.

Indoors is another issue. I'll be picking up a MkIII when they release. I hope that at least ISO can be adjusted on the fly through one of the dials or that it will be able to be set to Auto while video is in manual mode. We'll see.
 
Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Mu-43 is a fan site and not associated with Olympus, Panasonic, or other manufacturers mentioned on this site.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2009-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom