BAS - Book acquisition syndrome

JensM

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My wife just bought the English language version of the Henry Carrol book. It's perfect for beginners and others with no formal technical photography or compositional training. No wasted words and covers each topic in a couple of pages.

I would like to think I have the basics down pat, after pushing shutters on and off for 40 years, but this one seems different in a way I cant really explain. It is, as you state, very un-fluffy so I thought I should give it a spin. :thumbup:
 
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I don't have any interest in politics, but a review about this book caught my eye, so I ordered it from my library.

Callie Shell's foreword is lengthy, informative, and very enjoyable; her photo essay, made over eight years with the Obamas, shows real people, not just the highlights.

I was surprised by how small the book is (around A5 size, but quite thick at 224 pages). Most photos are accompanied by quotes from either Barack or Michelle, and are really thought-provoking.

This is exactly the kind of extended project I'd love to do - though not with anyone this important!

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Hope, Never Fear: a personal portrait of the Obamas by Callie Shell, 2019.
 
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Gone a bit book crazy lately (which is a good thing). First one off the ranks (not strictly a Photobook)

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Fellow bookaholics may enjoy "Rethinking Digital Photography" by John Neel. It's full of all sorts of crazy stuff like making pinhole lenses, tilt adapters, etc. This is the book that introduced me to M4/3 - for which I will be eternally grateful.

Amazon UK currently have it from £0.49 used.
 
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A project I back on Kickstarter arrived this week. I have a huge passion for coffee, so was pretty excited about this photobook. It was meant to be autographed, but wasn't (which is a small deal for me, but I wouldn't've made a fuss over it) and noticed one of the books look like it'd been dropped in one of the corners, it wasn't a huge deal but messaged Jake Green the creator just so he was aware, he was super nice and apologetic about it and is sending me two more copies (with autographed) he said to share the original two with friend.

I'm still going to enjoy them for a few weeks until the others arrive before I give them away though.

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This also showed up a month ago, another Kickstarter Project, super excited about it.

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With a trip to Tasmania on the horizon, I ordered Peter Dombrovskis Journeys into the Wild from my library for inspiration, and saw a review of The Soul of the Camera by David duChemin in Black+White Photography magazine - that one looks like a BAS one for me to purchase.
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Paul C

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Another vote for Gordon Laing's "In Camera: Perfect Pictures Straight Out of the Camera". I cannot praise this book too highly

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Our cameras have built in algorithms to correct lens errors, and optimise image taking for near every image style if only we could spend a few seconds delving into the control menu to set them.

After reading this book I now make far, far better use of in-camera settings - and have set up my custom menu ready for my favourite shooting styles. As for the criticism - yes, I totally get the point made by Saledolce earlier in this thread: So come on Gordon Laing - when does the "improved volume 2" come out where you build on the ground that you first mapped out? Given Gordon's insightful work on the physical testing of cameras in his CameraLabs reviews AND his regular use of M43 cameras - can we have more insight ito the changes in sensor to picture algorithms that lie behind the "in-camera" settings he uses - or, as others posting on this thread have humoursly described - is this information a trade secret from Panasonic and Olympus that will forever remain hidden from view and as useful as a "post-modern" critique by Derrida?

The result of my reading this book is more time with the camera and less time at the computer.....with RAW shooting reserved for images where I know that very specialist processing will be critical such as very dark images.

With Book Aquisition Syndrome vaued by resulting image improvement per page read - this has to be the top of the top ten!

Otherwise - remember that pictures often work best when they tell a story - and for studying and enjoying that there are few better publications that National Geographic - and few better of their photographers than Steve McCurry. My pick of his books is the wonderful photo essay The Imperial Way : By Rail from Peshwar to Chittagong – Published 1 Nov 1988 by Paul Theroux & Steve McCurry . It tells the story of a journey on India's Railways from West to East - with more space for pictures and text than in a Nat Geo magazine in the book version. Photographers will be happy that the picture story dominates over a far smaller component of text!

Classical Composers among you will be happy to see the textbook use of such picture elements as leading lines, rule of thirds, colour wheel theory, framing devices such as doors and windows and disrupted patterns.

From McCurry I have learned not to fret about loosing detail somewhere in the histogram: Transparecny film gave magical images yet Kodachrome 64 and 200 can record a dynamic range of only about 2.3D or 8 stops, as shown in the characteristic curves. It's freed me from chasing the artificial "HDR" look. I have also learned from McCurry to travel light - he uses a 24-70mm lens for 98% of his current work. Instead of a pile of lenses - carry a tripod, and a fold up light reflector or two

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FINALLY - here is a plea to support your public library system. In the UK, local libraries now have computer stock control - meaning that any book in any library in the three counties around my town is available free-to-order. Just type "photography" into the search box and be amazed by what is available....in my region, 535 pages of books to review and read......It's "BES" (BOOK ENJOYMENT SYNDROME) without "BAS" (BOOK AQUISITION SYMDROME) !
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Another vote for Gordon Laing's "In Camera: Perfect Pictures Straight Out of the Camera". I cannot praise this book too highly

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Our cameras have built in algorithms to correct lens errors, and optimise image taking for near every image style if only we could spend a few seconds delving into the control menu to set them.

After reading this book I now make far, far better use of in-camera settings - and have set up my custom menu ready for my favourite shooting styles. As for the criticism - yes, I totally get the point made by Saledolce earlier in this thread: So come on Gordon Laing - when does the "improved volume 2" come out where you build on the ground that you first mapped out? Given Gordon's insightful work on the physical testing of cameras in his CameraLabs reviews AND his regular use of M43 cameras - can we have more insight ito the changes in sensor to picture algorithms that lie behind the "in-camera" settings he uses - or, as others posting on this thread have humoursly described - is this information a trade secret from Panasonic and Olympus that will forever remain hidden from view and as useful as a "post-modern" critique by Derrida?

The result of my reading this book is more time with the camera and less time at the computer.....with RAW shooting reserved for images where I know that very specialist processing will be critical such as very dark images.

With Book Aquisition Syndrome vaued by resulting image improvement per page read - this has to be the top of the top ten!

Otherwise - remember that pictures often work best when they tell a story - and for studying and enjoying that there are few better publications that National Geographic - and few better of their photographers than Steve McCurry. My pick of his books is the wonderful photo essay The Imperial Way : By Rail from Peshwar to Chittagong – Published 1 Nov 1988 by Paul Theroux & Steve McCurry . It tells the story of a journey on India's Railways from West to East - with more space for pictures and text than in a Nat Geo magazine in the book version. Photographers will be happy that the picture story dominates over a far smaller component of text!

Classical Composers among you will be happy to see the textbook use of such picture elements as leading lines, rule of thirds, colour wheel theory, framing devices such as doors and windows and disrupted patterns.

From McCurry I have learned not to fret about loosing detail somewhere in the histogram: Transparecny film gave magical images yet Kodachrome 64 and 200 can record a dynamic range of only about 2.3D or 8 stops, as shown in the characteristic curves. It's freed me from chasing the artificial "HDR" look. I have also learned from McCurry to travel light - he uses a 24-70mm lens for 98% of his current work. Instead of a pile of lenses - carry a tripod, and a fold up light reflector or two

View attachment 792201

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FINALLY - here is a plea to support your public library system. In the UK, local libraries now have computer stock control - meaning that any book in any library in the three counties around my town is available free-to-order. Just type "photography" into the search box and be amazed by what is available....in my region, 535 pages of books to review and read......It's "BES" (BOOK ENJOYMENT SYNDROME) without "BAS" (BOOK AQUISITION SYMDROME) !
View attachment 792212

+1 for Gordon Laing and Steve McCurry! As a public library employee, I'm all for your suggestion - it's also a great way to try before you buy, especially as many photo books are quite expensive.
 
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Another vote for Gordon Laing's "In Camera: Perfect Pictures Straight Out of the Camera". I cannot praise this book too highly

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---​

I'm a huge fan of this book. It has a permanent home on desk or my bed side table. Super easy to pick up and flick through in a rut.
 
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I'm another fan of "in camera". But it seems to me that the title undersells the book. It's not just about getting factors like exposure and white balance right "in camera" so you don't have to faff about on the computer. It's about getting everything right, including point of view, focal length and depth of field - things you can't fix on the computer.

It's almost 100 "worked examples" of how a pro takes a shot. Excellent stuff for anyone who has passed the beginner stage and is looking to improve further.
 

Julia

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Hey everyone, just wanted thank all of you who suggested “In Camera” by Gordon Laing. My book local brick and mortar book store pulled off quite the feat and organized it for me in less than 24 hours (in Germany, today is already Christmas and stores close at noon). But the book was under the Christmas tree. Cheers and happy holidays :thumbup:🎄
 

Walter

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BAS has accompanied me through all my life.
When I moved home three years ago, I gave away one third of my books. But I kept all my photography books because I still like browsing through them. Good shots are an inspiration. And much of what you find today can't compete with the standards of Adams, Mante, Feininger and the like.
But there are some fascinating guys publishing great books like DuChemin, Laing, Barnbaum etc. and I'm glad to get pdfs. So you can browse them on the computer and decide what will find a place in the bookshelves. I'm still a bit old-fashioned there: nothing beats the feel and smell of a good book ... and the way you get your information, even without electricity. And no web-seller can give you the atmosphere of a well-stocked local book shop or library.
 

Zairski

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My most recent purchases.
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I like physical books but have almost all of my photo books on my kindle. I thought that I would like it since I can take them anywhere but I’m finding that I actually miss the hard copies more.
The Olympus Passion digital magazine is well worth the $20/year subscription.
 

dougpayne

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The anti-clutter gal says you shouldn't own more than 30 books. I have more than that in just one nearby stack.
 

Zairski

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Thanks for the recommendation... what do you use to read this digital magazine? Just view it in your browser or is there an iPad app you use to download and save?
I read it on the Safari browser, you can download the issue and save it to your computer or you can load it onto an app like the amazon kindle app to read over iPhone , iPad or computer. You can either subscribe or buy individual issues to try out.
 
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