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Auto ISO in Manual Mode on the new PEN-F?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by acmatos, Feb 10, 2016.

  1. acmatos

    acmatos Mu-43 Regular

    I've just read this on Luminous Lanscape "Hands On Early Preview" of the PEN-F:

    "I like the Auto ISO Feature. Setting the camera in Manual Mode I set the f/stop and shutter speed and let the camera handle the ISO based on changing lighting conditions."
    (https://luminous-landscape.com/olympus-pen-f-hands-on-review)

    As far as I know this would be a completely new feature on Olympus cameras.

    Can anyone confirm this, please?

    Thanks in advance,

    António Carlos Matos
    Ponte de Lima | Portugal
     
  2. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    ..... as far as I can recall, all Olympus m43 bodies have this feature .....
     
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  3. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    Did not read the article (not interested in the Pen F) and we already had a thread where we discussed this. No, my EM1 will do Auto ISO in M mode (I will not use the name manual mode as this causes all kinds of problems here so I just call it M mode). What the Pen F will do that no other Olympus camera, is allow the use of exposure compensation while in M mode with Auto ISO.
     
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  4. acmatos

    acmatos Mu-43 Regular

    Thanks for you quick answers!
    And sorry if this was discussed before -- I did search before beginning this thread...

    No, @Sammyboy@Sammyboy, I don't think all m4/3 cameras have Auto ISO on M Mode -- at least the cameras I own don't have it: E-M5 mk1, Panasonic GM-1 and Panasonic G1.

    And @Phocal@Phocal, is that a new feature introduced with the firmware updates?

    Because I had read this on the EM1 User Manual (you're right about the confusion with the "M Mode"...):
    "Auto ISO sensitivity selection is available in all mode except M. ISO sensitivity is fixed at ISO200 in mode M." (page 97)

    That's exactly how my E-M5 works.
     
  5. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    It's available for E-M5 Mk1 as well, just no exposure comp. I had it enabled - it must be set to be on in all modes in the detailed options menu, by default it's set to be enabled for P/A/S only.
     
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  6. Youngjun

    Youngjun Mu-43 Regular

    156
    Feb 24, 2015
    USA
    Youngjun
    E-PM2 has that feature as well.
     
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  7. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    Well, that is a stupendous, wonderful, great feature that every competent digital camera would have in an ideal world. If my GX7 had that, I'd shoot far more with my adapted lenses and be the happier for it.

    It's one of the few UI things that Sony does really right.

    It's also a crying shame that Panasonic decided not to implement such a simple but valuable feature on the GX8, especially now that it has a dedicated exposure comp. dial.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2016
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  8. acmatos

    acmatos Mu-43 Regular

    Yes, you're right @wjiang@wjiang (and you too @Sammyboy@Sammyboy and @Phocal@Phocal, of course)!
    Amazing how I had never figured this, silly me!
    Thanks a lot for your help!
     
  9. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    On OM-D bodies, the setting is called "ISO-Auto" in section E, and must be set to 'ALL'.

    Barry
     
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  10. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Note that Oly does release new manuals with major new firmware releases; it's possible this was added at some point (or the manual is just wrong), but I know I've been using it since 2014.

    Barry
     
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  11. acmatos

    acmatos Mu-43 Regular

    No, @barry13@barry13, you're right: that feature was probably there from the beginning.

    It was my fault, I did not read the whole thing: :-(
    "(P/A/S) Auto ISO sensitivity selection is available in all mode except M. ISO sensitivity is fixed at ISO200 in mode M.
    (All) Auto ISO sensitivity selection is available in all modes"
     
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  12. robcee

    robcee Mu-43 Veteran

    289
    Jan 10, 2016
    Toronto
    Rob Campbell
    am I the only one that finds the notion of using Auto-ISO in something akin to "Manual" mode kind of funny? I go to Manual or M mode so I can have total control over what's happening. I don't want the thing to bump up my ISO when I'm trying to make a long exposure.
     
  13. Ian.

    Ian. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2013
    Munich
    Ian
    No its 'M' mode and no longer Manual Mode. Yes, it's another form of Auto, when Auto ISO is enabled. But many people want the ability to dial in +/- exposure compensation. Then you have control of the ISO too. But Relative ISO, (e.g. +1 stop) not absolute ISO. (For that, switch Auto ISO off.) Relative ISO saves you adjusting up and down when the light level changes.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2016
  14. Growltiger

    Growltiger Mu-43 Top Veteran

    641
    Mar 26, 2014
    UK
    That is why you should call it M mode instead of Manual mode.
    In M mode you have the choice of making it Manual mode, with an ISO you set, or M mode with Auto-ISO. Your choice.
     
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  15. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 13, 2014
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    You know what, I used to think the same way, until I tried it. I do not use it all the time, but there are times when I want the shutter speed locked at a certain value to freeze or blur motion, the aperture to get a specific depth of field...but I want the camera to produce a specific exposure. For example, I'm shooting street, and I have some people walking in and out of a deep shadow. I may want to keep the shutter speed at 1/250 to get the fast walkers/runners frozen, but I want to shoot at f/1.8. I can lock the camera down to those settings, but then let the ISO roll up and down as need be to compensate for the variance.

    I also tried it a few times shooting sports indoors where one side of the court was lit differently than another. I still get my action freezing shutter speed, but I don't have to constantly use the exposure comp from one side to the other.

    It might not be a big deal shooting RAW for 1-2 stops of exposure difference and processing that in post(locking the ISO), but if you've got a wider variance than that, it is nice for the camera to be able to compensate for me.

    Not something I would use all the time, but something that is nice to have for those timeswhen you really need it.
     
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  16. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    (It will never do that without you wanting it to, but, anyway...)

    In my humble opinion, Auto ISO in M mode with exposure compensation is the very best way to meter a camera, and all other methods are compromised. It is excellent for these reasons:

    1) Control over aperture. Since this affects DoF, it's a creative variable I want to set myself.
    2) Control over shutter speed. Since this affects scene motion, it's a creative variable I want to set myself.
    3) Control over overall brightness (with exposure compensation). This is a huge advantage of mirrorless cameras, since you get a what-you-see-is-what-you-get preview of exactly the way the meter is interpreting your scene. No need to remember rules of thumb about 50% grey, and black cats in coal mines, and Snowy 22, or any of that other stuff.

    4) No control over ISO. This is also great. There is only 1 correct ISO for any scene, ever. And that is the absolute lowest one that satisfies all of those previous conditions. If you are ever shooting in changing light (like at dusk or dawn, or in mottled shade, or moving around, or changing direction, etc...) which realistically is pretty often, you know that you'll still get the exposure you want, with the creative parameters you want, with the absolute best image quality.

    It's all fine and dandy to chase a meter around with the ISO button, but I'd rather focus on being creative when I'm taking photos.
     
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  17. Youngjun

    Youngjun Mu-43 Regular

    156
    Feb 24, 2015
    USA
    Youngjun
    What do you think about the auto-white balance?
     
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  18. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    Not your fault......it was in a thread about the Pen F in general.....I just tried to find the thread and can't seem to locate it. It got really stupid and I stopped participating in it.
     
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  19. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    That is why I call it M mode and not the other word. There are lots of times this is very useful, especially as a wildlife/sports photographer with your subject moving in and out of shadow/light or sun going behind a cloud. I mostly only use it during inclement weather when I am going to be shooting at higher ISO's then 200 and want control over aperture/shutter for creative/need reasons and I am willing to let ISO drift (up to my maximum 1600 that I will not shoot wildlife past).
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2016
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  20. robcee

    robcee Mu-43 Veteran

    289
    Jan 10, 2016
    Toronto
    Rob Campbell
    ok, that's a pretty compelling use-case. You folks jumped all over that post with some excellent justifications for it.

    lol. I usually think it's pretty cool! If I'm shooting RAW, if I don't agree with the camera's interpretation of a scene I can always fix it in post. but I get your point.

    How do you get EC with an OM-D? Is that even possible? Legit question, I'm learnin' stuff here.

    I would argue that manual ISO control is another creative parameter. In general, for best IQ, I agree with you: the correct ISO is the lowest one, but I find the higher ISOs like 3200 and 4000 can have a useful grain to them, or provide interesting contrast in the right setting. Sports photography is one place where I might pin my ISO and aperture and control my exposure with the shutter speed to get the effect I want. Not that I shoot a lot of sports.

    Anyway, interesting thread. Y'all have converted me to a believer and I'll give it a try.:th_salute:
     
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