Audio sounds dull

litepsort

Mu-43 Rookie
Joined
Mar 5, 2020
Messages
10
I am recording my sons band using an Em1 mk3 with a Rode Videopro Mic attached.
I am leaving everything as is as I don't really know what I'm doing. My issue is that the sound comes out flat/dull, hope that makes sense.

So what should I be doing, or what settings should I be using?
I am also happy to change to a different microphone and my kids are getting into film making using this camera and the Rode mic is about 10 years old. Not that I want to spend money but if needs must, then…

I have seen this thread and am yet to try these settings; https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/4147755
I have also read this thread; https://www.mu-43.com/threads/mic-for-piano.103821/

But if any of you have experience, could recommend a video tutorial and generally have information you could share, I would really appreciate it
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2017
Messages
247
Location
Wisconsin, USA
Not a professional but I have made recordings of my wife playing the piano and my biggest improvement came from using a mic that made a second audio track that I would sync up in post.

Most video editing software makes this very easy.

I started with a Zoom H2n and now use a Olympus LS-P4 as with the smaller Olympus I keep it in the bag and used it (before last year) when I come across a busker or street performer as it is actually with me instead of at home like the Zoom mic would stay because of the size.

Not that the Zoom was that large but it would bump a prime lens out of my EDC bag and I only took it deliberately instead of leaving it in my bag like the LS-P4 does.
 
Joined
Aug 13, 2014
Messages
3,961
Location
Honolulu, HI
Real Name
Walter
Audio recording is a whole universe of new stuff to learn and new hardware. I don't pretend to know anything about it, but I got an LS-P4 in the hope of learning more about sound recording. I think there are sites around that specialize in audio recording, so you might want to take a look around.
 

ABFoz

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
Messages
69
Location
Tamaki Makaurau, Aotearoa
Real Name
No estoy listo para esto todavía.
I am leaving everything as is as I don't really know what I'm doing. My issue is that the sound comes out flat/dull, hope that makes sense.
Audiophile here but not just for listening. I also am into high dynamic range audio recording. Dynamic range - sounds familiar? It's a hobby for now but I used to perform and record at the same time.

The industry always records with separate audio. You might want to consider that. I always use portable Sony recorders but Olympus also has good ones. In a studio/controlled environment, I use different audio interfaces and/or multiple tracks.

Also, there is a chance your mic is registering high resistance so check your cables and connector. If resistance is too high and/or connection is loose, the camera will just revert back to using the internal microphones.

If you are recording a band, I would suggest multiple tracks so you have better controllability on the tones and gain. This one is studio territory already. If your son's band is recording in a studio then bingo! You can do whatever you want with your camera and sync up with the engineered audio in post. After doing that, you have yourself a studio music video just like what artists used to do in the 70's before videos became total eyecandy productions.

How many are in the band and what instruments are being played? Cheers.
 

litepsort

Mu-43 Rookie
Joined
Mar 5, 2020
Messages
10
Audiophile here but not just for listening. I also am into high dynamic range audio recording. Dynamic range - sounds familiar? It's a hobby for now but I used to perform and record at the same time.

The industry always records with separate audio. You might want to consider that. I always use portable Sony recorders but Olympus also has good ones. In a studio/controlled environment, I use different audio interfaces and/or multiple tracks.

Also, there is a chance your mic is registering high resistance so check your cables and connector. If resistance is too high and/or connection is loose, the camera will just revert back to using the internal microphones.

If you are recording a band, I would suggest multiple tracks so you have better controllability on the tones and gain. This one is studio territory already. If your son's band is recording in a studio then bingo! You can do whatever you want with your camera and sync up with the engineered audio in post. After doing that, you have yourself a studio music video just like what artists used to do in the 70's before videos became total eyecandy productions.

How many are in the band and what instruments are being played? Cheers.
2 guitars, bass, drums and singer.
Currently I am only recording school performances and the like. They are only 15 and just starting out playing covers. I'll add a link to youtube (need to upload the video first) so you can see what I mean.
 
Joined
Jan 19, 2018
Messages
597
Location
Leura, Blue Mountains Australia
Recording a band requires multiple mics and a separate recorder like a Zoom multitrack recorder. Recording with 1 mic (shotgun), like the video mic pro makes it hard.
How far away are you from the band? Is the mic pointed at the singer? Lot's of questions. Are they using amplifiers and speakers? Try putting the mic near the main speaker box. That may help a little.
 

ABFoz

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
Messages
69
Location
Tamaki Makaurau, Aotearoa
Real Name
No estoy listo para esto todavía.
This is one of the recordings I made of the band. They are playing at their high school.

My son is the drummer.
The school is Western Academy of Beijing.
wab.edu
Thanks for uploading the reference video.

That seems normal recording for the usual shotgun, usually directional, microphone although I understand the muddiness that you are referring to. You may be getting the limits of using such microphone already.

That being said, I would improve the quality of the audio in terms of 1) adjusting the stage acoustics (cheapest solution), 2) getting a PCM recorder for better quality recording and 3) getting the full audio interface-DAW suit with separate tracks (most expensive).

The recording with the microphone connected to the camera can immediately be improved by adjusting the acoustics of the sources, since in-camera audio chipsets are weaker vs separate audio options. The input is overwhelmed by the volume of the drums so they can be isolated and/or the other sources' gain/intensity can be increased by moving ALL the amplifiers in-front of the drumset and increasing their gain (easier to do in-person) and/or getting a drum shield.
1617949298500.png
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

The drum shield is optional but moving and stacking the amplifiers in a semi-circle shape and as close to the players as possible will not only get more exposure from the amps but also give much more feedback to the players as, at the moment, their eardrums are also overwhelmed by the sound of the drums because their amps are behind the drums.

With those stage acoustics adjustments done, you can get a PCM recorder to record separate audio at higher definition, 16-bit/44KHz for CD quality to HD at 24-bit/192KHz. This is cheaper than getting into proper digital audio recording using an audio interface and a DAW. Out of the box, the LS-P4 can get better sound (16/44) than any shotgun microphone in the market just because the LS-P4 uses a much more engineered chipset vs the in-camera ones. This is the most balanced option in terms of complexity and cost.

The best way to get the best audio for this one is to record multiple tracks, 1 for each guitar, 1 for the voice and at least 2 for the drums on an audio interface connected to a digital audio workstation (DAW) for post processing but it can be a bit tasking and expensive. If you want to get into recording this way but not spend too much, you can get an audio interface with 2 inputs and record stereo using dynamic microphones in stereo placed 2 metres from the ground. This improvement is on a different discipline and you may get overwhelmed with the post-processing and setup if you are into grab-and-go recording.

So you can improve the audio by adjusting the stage acoustics, using a PCM recorder after the acoustic adjustments and using an audio interface+DAW but the best balance for you in terms of complexity and cost is the 2nd option.

I use the third option, audio interface + DAW. I will even use it to record HD audio + video, of course, for an acoustic gig this Saturday.

Note 1: Even with the current stage acoustics, you can use the audio files from PCM recorders and process them using a DAW to equalise the sound.

Note 2: Your Rode mic may have a high-pass filter and the specification says it's at 80 (I am assuming KHz). Try turning that on and see if that actually attenuates the frequencies lower than 80 KHz.

I hope I am making sense.

It's easier to do and explain in-person than through a forum. Cheers.
 
Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Mu-43 is a fan site and not associated with Olympus, Panasonic, or other manufacturers mentioned on this site.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Forum GIFs powered by GIPHY: https://giphy.com/
Copyright © Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom