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Attending professional workshops with m43?

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by gdourado, May 30, 2012.

  1. gdourado

    gdourado Mu-43 Regular

    117
    Feb 23, 2012
    Lisbon - Portugal
    Hello,
    How are you?

    Today I was browsing some local workshops here and then I started to wonder...

    Have you ever attended professional workshops with a m43 camera?
    I mean those kind of workshops of fashion, glamour and portrait photography. With professional models, makeup and styling.

    With an enfasys on lighting and production.

    I mean, the majority of people out there you shoot those kinds of pictures, usually use full frame cameras with an assortment of lenses and accessories.

    I know first hand that a m43 camera with good glass is a very capable camera, but can we m43 shooters be taken seriously with our tiny cameras and shooting through the lcd in those kind of environments?

    Did you ever got strange looks? Or felt odd?

    I know the gear is just a tool, and creativity and vision cannot be bought , but I was just wondering...

    Cheers!

    Sent from my GT-N7000 using Tapatalk 2
     
  2. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    That's really all you need to know. In my experience the vast majority of people with the big DSLRs are clueless snapshooters with cameras set to automatic exposure. Why would you care what they think?
     
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  3. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Promit Roy
    Yeah, I'm actually kind of tired of going to these classes and having aperture explained to me for the twentieth time. These are not typically gearheads in these classes.
     
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  4. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Actually, you could say that they are gearheads in a funny kind of way. They think that buying the big camera and the big lenses makes them photographers. But, at least the ones in the classes are trying to learn. You can't fault them for that.

    When we were in Africa last November, one of those guys showed up for a game drive. Giant camera, big lenses, Gitzo carbon tripod, wife as sherpa. Apparently someone had told him to take a lot of pictures in order to get a good one. Most of his shots were mulitple exposures of animals' butts as they headed off into the weeds. By the end of his trip, I'm sure he had hundreds.

    In the Galapagos a couple of years ago, we traveled with an English guy who had been sold a giant camera. Very nice guy. Over drinks on the rear deck one night, I showed him how aperture affected depth of field. He was astonished and grateful. No one had ever explained aperture to him. I also taught another passenger how to hold her big Nikon for stability and how to use structures and people to get more stability. She, too, was grateful.
     
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  5. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Even the gearhead-oriented ones are not so valuable. Truly improving photographic vision requires a lot of time and practice. At best, a weekend workshop can serve as inspiration for later efforts.

    DH
     
  6. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    I'm constantly amazed to see some people shooting 5D's, 7D's in 'green box' mode. I've had a few of the 'explain the basic camera settings to people' sessions on various trips. It only takes about 15 minutes to explain the bare-bones (aperture, ISO and exposure comp, and the 'one over focal length' thing) 'manual' control that lets people take a whole lot more control of their cameras. Mastery is a different issue.
     
  7. briloop

    briloop Mu-43 Regular

    171
    May 23, 2012
    Mount Juliet, TN
    I've gone to several photography meetups, which were led by professional photographers, with my Nikon D5000. These meetups varied in locale, theme, and type of lighting used. I usually felt out-gunned by most of my fellow attendees, who brought their FF cameras. As soon as I get my hands on an E-M5, I certainly plan to take it to my photography meetups. I can't wait to see everyone's reactions, especially when I post my photos to the meetup website. I will post my experiences.
     
  8. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    The theory is simple. But it's easy to get things wrong in practice. And if you already have something that's working well 90% of the time, you may be reluctant to put in the time and effort necessary for the basics to become second-nature.

    DH
     
  9. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Those are professional workshops? They may or may not be hosted by a professional photographer, but the workshop itself is aimed at the amateur photographer. At least, any such workshop I have seen. Professional photographers go to school (and sometimes not), and mostly learn from experience on the job. I've never seen a "workshop" aimed at professionals.

    Which majority of people? If you're talking statistically, then you should see a dominance in APS-C not Full Frame.

    I bring Micro Four-Thirds cameras to work, shooting as a professional photographer on the job. I've never once gotten strange looks over my cameras, only admiration and and curiosity. My clients know that I'm the professional, and that I choose only the best equipment for the job. When people see the unique equipment I use, they want to know all about it.

    I wouldn't care what amateurs at a workshop think. You're there to learn, so worry about learning!
     
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  10. landshark

    landshark Mu-43 Veteran

    307
    Apr 27, 2010
    SO CAL
    When I taught workshops I never cared what camera you brought, as long as your camera can do manual control of aperture and shutter speed, and had some form of flash sync capability. Format was never an issue.
     
  11. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    The word "Professional" used with terms like "camera" and "workshop" is a marketing term. Why would a professional go to a basic lighting workshop? How did they get a money-making career without knowing the basic skills?

    As far as what camera I turned up with, I really don't care. I would chose the best tool for the situation. Besides, if it is a lighting workshop, the camera is superfluous.
     
  12. landshark

    landshark Mu-43 Veteran

    307
    Apr 27, 2010
    SO CAL
    Beg to differ just because one is a working professional does not mean they have had to light anything, most sports shooters have not, a lot of fashion shooters have only worked with natural light, event shooters who have only used on camera flash, etc. We all have things we can learn.
     
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  13. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    And how do you stage the Superbowl in a studio?

    Have you ever done fashion photography professionally? All the folks I know that went into fashion photography knew their studio lighting skills very well.

    Sure, we all have things to learn. But if your sports photography business has just suddenly collapsed and you think you can then making it in product photography, you are not a professional product photographer. You are starting at square one. The point being, if you are working professionally in a field it is really hard to find a workshop that will actually teach you something new.
     
  14. landshark

    landshark Mu-43 Veteran

    307
    Apr 27, 2010
    SO CAL
    Wow, you seem to know very little about the business.
    No Super bowl in the studio, but after shooting on the sidelines for one’s whole career some clients wants to hire you to shoot the hosts of the broadcast and you have to light it. Where did they learn that task in all their sports shoots.
    Being a professional photographer is not like being a doctor where you are required to be a GP/intern before you are allowed to specialize.

    A lot of fashion shooters are natural light shooter that does not mean they cannot see light, it is just that many did not actually light using artificials. There is no lighting license required to make a living in this business.
    I have been shooting professionally (my only way of making a living) for over 30 years, I have used most everything, shot most everything and lite most everything and I can still learn. If your ego gets in the way of learning, you will never grow. While assisting may have been the best learning tool, seminars and workshops also can go a long way in take someone to the next level.
     
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  15. gsciorio

    gsciorio Mu-43 Top Veteran

    636
    Dec 29, 2011
    Miami, FL
    Oh you'd be surprised whos getting jobs these days.:rofl: Seriously though its less about technique and more about vision. If you have a good vision and can show it through a portfolio and you land a job with a good budget then you hire a good producer and they hire a good gaffer, tech and really good craft services and you're in the picture making business.
     
  16. landshark

    landshark Mu-43 Veteran

    307
    Apr 27, 2010
    SO CAL
    A great first assistant can make miracles happen
     
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  17. landshark

    landshark Mu-43 Veteran

    307
    Apr 27, 2010
    SO CAL
    The more I thought about these comments the more it became obvious of the lack of understanding of the different skill sets that different Pros have or need.
    My career has taken me down a path where I have had to be good at a lot of different skills but that is not necessarily where others have had to go. Because you can light portraits, does not mean you know how to do tabletops, or large movie sets, or cars, or groups, or fashion or food, they all require different techniques, something one could learn in a workshop. And again just because you are good at shooting headshots for a living does not mean one should learn a new skill and branch out to shoot Architecture or whatever.

    The flash sync abilities of the camera being used can have a large effect on how one can use strobe lighting, sync speed, controlling when the flash fires by setting for either the front or rear curtain,etc
     
  18. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    The few times that I hung out with pros....I felt out of place. BUT NOT BECAUSE OF MY CAMERA BODY.

    What made me feel out of place was that I had no lenses to match theirs. Bodies were pretty much irrelevant in the settings that I was in - lenses were the key.
     
  19. Jonathan F/2

    Jonathan F/2 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 10, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    I thought most glamour workshops are for old guys who like to perv out while shooting pretty girls they'll never date! :wink:
     
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  20. Iansky

    Iansky Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 26, 2009
    The Cotswolds, UK
    Many responses before this got converted into a "Professional / non Professional" capability post and eluded to the fact that the camera used should not be your concern. If you know it and how to get the best from it in different light situations including studio then you will probably find that the images you produce will probably exceed those taken by some of the attendees with "Professional cameras".

    It is not the equipment that makes the professional (although it does help) but the skill of the person using it and in reality what identifies a professional is the fact that they make their living from photography full time.

    There are an increasing number of professionals out there who are using Mu43 for their work as well as their private work and producing some amazing results so please do not get hung up on the size/format of your camera equipment, you may just convert some other attendees once they see your results.

    Good luck and enjoy!
     
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