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Featured astro with my laowa

Discussion in 'Astrophotography' started by travelbug, Mar 30, 2019.

  1. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Oct 20, 2014
    all are single, non composited, un stacked images

    6 fb.jpg
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    2cfb.jpg
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    12fb.jpg
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    10 fb.jpg
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  2. peter_4059

    peter_4059 Mu-43 Regular

    130
    Dec 23, 2018
    Brisbane, Australia
    Peter
    Great nightscape images. Can you share how you captured them?
     
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  3. pake

    pake Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Oct 14, 2010
    Finland
    Teemu
    Insanely good for "single, non composited, un stacked images"! :bravo-009:
     
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  4. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Oct 20, 2014
    Sure, I normally use iso1250, f2.0, 30 secs . For the shots taken during twilight I go down to iso 1000, f/2.8.
    The images look fuzzier here I dont know why, but they are printable with no noise to 24inches. I have not tried bigger though.
     
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  5. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Oct 20, 2014
    Notes:
    I normally shoot with guys using full frame and some apsc cameras. Im surprised that for night photos, my shots seem to come out consistently brighter with this setup. Even if I use similar settings (ie stop down the Laowa, same ss and iso), my shots still look brighter from the camera lcd's. I dont know if its the lens; or maybe the smaller photosites of the mft sensor are actually more light sensitive (smaller=easier to activate?), but it was a really peculiar yet very encouraging finding.
     
  6. It might actually be that the LCD is brighter... this is not a good thing IMO, as it kills your night vision.
     
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  7. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Oct 20, 2014
    no its not that, cause the my final output is still brighter
     
  8. Higher T-stop on your lens then?
     
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  9. StefanKruse

    StefanKruse Mu-43 Top Veteran

    526
    Jan 28, 2015
    Denmark
    Stefan
    Very nice - especially the first shot - keep em coming
     
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  10. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Oct 20, 2014
    could be, the actual t stop of the laowa could be the same as its printed f stop.
    although I wouldn't discount what I said about the smaller photo sites of an mft sensor as the cause. An astrographer friend of mine said there are many dedicated mft astro cameras except that they are liquid cooled. So it could be that, as long as you can control noise from sensor heat /gain the mft sensor may indeed be quite good for Astro
     
  11. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Oct 20, 2014
    Here are some startrails with the Laowa and the Oly OMD em5ii
    13fb.jpg
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    the real st4 fb.jpg
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  12. Wow, these are very nice :2thumbs: It might cause me to get my old tired ass out of bed and go and try some night-scapes. Thanks for posting.
     
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  13. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Oct 20, 2014
    Thank you, one of the main reasons for me posting and sharing these is to encourage other people to try and think out of the box. Conventional 'wisdom' teaches us that mft is not good for Astro; that you can't take a Milky close to sunrise ;that you shouldn't shoot the Milky when the moon is out ;that your last chance to take a Milky is astronomical twilight etc etc. These images break those 'rukes' and more. So I encourage everyone to just try and experiment you lose nothing anyways by doing so - well maybe a little sleep
     
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  14. Bushboy

    Bushboy Mu-43 Top Veteran

    590
    Apr 22, 2018
    Aotearoa
    Charlie
    The first one is wicked!
    So cool.
     
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  15. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Oct 20, 2014
    thanks that image was taken deep into nautical twilight and you can clearly see the rising sun's brightness on the left. From where I'm from this is considered an almost impossible shot because of how bright the sky gets at this time
     
  16. I always thought Milky Way landscapes were better with some moon lighting the landscape anyway - without it the landscape ends up too dark.
     
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  17. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Oct 20, 2014
    The usual way of going about this is to do some diffuse light painting. For example the lighthouse above is light painted using diffuse light. But I find moonlight to produce a more aesthetically pleasing light.
     
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  18. Chris5107

    Chris5107 Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Jan 28, 2011
    USA
    Chris
    I am just getting interested in Astro and your photos are great encouragement as well as being great photos.
     
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  19. acnomad

    acnomad Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    465
    Jan 5, 2016
    Andy
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  20. dirtdevil

    dirtdevil Mu-43 Top Veteran

    758
    Apr 9, 2017
    @travelbug@travelbug
    How far away were you (in kilometers or the time you took driving) from the nearest town (that could've impacted the nightsky)?
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2019
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