Are you able to focus using a cheap u4/3 macro tube set?

icase81

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
67
Location
Philly, PA
Rather than pony up for a real macro lens which I'll only use on occasion for jollies, I was thinking of either buying the Oly MCON-P01 or a set of macro tubes on eBay. The macrotubes are appealing because they'll 'work' with all my lenses, including the 40-150, but I'm questioning how to focus if theres no electrical connection to the lens since the lenses I have (14-42, 40-150 and 17mm) are all focus by wire.

Short of buying to of the u4/3 autofocus chips and soldering all 9 or however many wires there are between them so it completes the circuits, is it still possible to focus manually?

Or in the end should I just spend the $50 on the MCON-P01?
Olympus - MCON-P01 Macro Converter

I'm assuming optically its at least 2 steps above the random garbage on Amazon and eBay being its from Oly themselves. Any suggestions?
 

addieleman

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Aug 5, 2010
Messages
1,043
Location
The Netherlands
Real Name
Ad
Macro alternative

For about the same budget you can buy a used legacy macro lens and an adapter to mount it on a µ4/3 camera. There are many good ones available, like the Micro-Nikkor 55/3.5 which I own and the Olympus/Canon/Minolta/Pentax/... equivalents. You can find both the lens and the adapter at eBay. This should set you back anywhere between $50 and $100, depending on your patience to wait for the right deal, and you'd have a really excellent macro setup that way.

It's best to get a lens first and then order the corresponding adapter from a supplier in Hong Kong, China or Singapore.
 

addieleman

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Aug 5, 2010
Messages
1,043
Location
The Netherlands
Real Name
Ad
I have an OM adapter
In that case try to get an Olympus OM macro 50/3.5. I don't know how expensive they are; if you can't get one below $100, you'd be better off trying to get an other brand's 50mm macro and buy a matching adapter as well. Remember, any of the major brand 50mm macro's, even old ones, are invariably excellent lenses, it's not easy to go wrong with them.

Edit: speaking of old macro lenses, this one is as sharp as it gets on my cameras.
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

Stephen Geis

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
May 13, 2010
Messages
538
Location
Charlotte, NC
In that case try to get an Olympus OM macro 50/3.5. I don't know how expensive they are; if you can't get one below $100, you'd be better off trying to get an other brand's 50mm macro and buy a matching adapter as well. Remember, any of the major brand 50mm macro's, even old ones, are invariably excellent lenses, it's not easy to go wrong with them.

Edit: speaking of old macro lenses, this one is as sharp as it gets on my cameras.
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
X2

One of my favorite lenses
 

icase81

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
67
Location
Philly, PA
My dad may actually have a 50mm OM lens already. I just need to check if its a macro or not.
 

shoturtle

 
Joined
Oct 15, 2010
Messages
823
with a conversion like the oly one, it is only design for a 37mm thread. I use a canon 500D close up lens with a 58mm thread, and have 58mm to 52mm step up ring for it. And the AF is spot on when I use a small AF point.

The problem with tubes is you will have to alway need 2 hands unmount and remount the tube, it can be a pain to use for handheld close ups. It also increasing he chance of dropping the lens or body. Here are some example for a simple an light weight system. The 500D will work on the 40-150. But with the short lens the the 4 diopter 250D would work better. Step up rings are pretty cheap on ebay. The 500D comes in 52mm, 58mm, 72mm and 77mm.

https://www.mu-43.com/f38/macro-option-epl-1-panny-45-200-a-7106/
 

icase81

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
67
Location
Philly, PA
Manually, of course. That's why you don't need autofocus for macro. No autofocus, no need for wires.
You miss the point. You can't manually focus these lenses unless there is power to them. There is no gear in them that focuses them. You turn the ring, the ring tells the body its being turned, which then the body tells the lens to move the focus.
 

shoturtle

 
Joined
Oct 15, 2010
Messages
823
yup if the ebay tubes do not have electrical contacts. You will not be able to focus. And I think you might be stuck at the widest aperture also. So you will have allot of dof issues.

And some of the cheapo tubes have light leaking issues also. Especially if they are plastic.
 

photoSmart42

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Feb 12, 2010
Messages
628
Location
San Diego, CA
You miss the point. You can't manually focus these lenses unless there is power to them. There is no gear in them that focuses them. You turn the ring, the ring tells the body its being turned, which then the body tells the lens to move the focus.
I'm pretty sure it's you who are missing the point here - perhaps stopping to listen to what people here are trying to tell you would be more beneficial than arguing. You've been getting lots of good advice in this thread. You can focus any lens by physically moving it farther or closer to the object you're trying to photograph... It's called "focusing with your feet". People took macro photographs long before the application of electricity to cameras.
 

shoturtle

 
Joined
Oct 15, 2010
Messages
823
MFD needs to be taken into account. As sometimes focus with your feet will present an issue. You might move in to close and shadow your subject.
 

photoSmart42

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Feb 12, 2010
Messages
628
Location
San Diego, CA
MFD needs to be taken into account. As sometimes focus with your feet will present an issue. You might move in to close and shadow your subject.
Can't say I've ever had that issue. I even shoot macro using enlarger lenses at the end of extension tubes with great success. No wires, no focus ring. Works perfectly. Takes some patience, but macro is all about patience.
 

shoturtle

 
Joined
Oct 15, 2010
Messages
823
I have had that problem with shadows. Especially with subjects that can decide to up and leave. Sometime patience will not get you the shot, where a faster setup will. There are valid pros and cons about both methods. But mf focus is not always need with modern AF and lens. They do spot on jobs for hand held things like this, as this little guy flew away right after I took the shot.
 

photoSmart42

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Feb 12, 2010
Messages
628
Location
San Diego, CA
I have had that problem with shadows. Especially with subjects that can decide to up and leave. Sometime patience will not get you the shot, where a faster setup will. There are valid pros and cons about both methods. But mf focus is not always need with modern AF and lens. They do spot on jobs for hand held things like this, as this little guy flew away right after I took the shot.
Never said AF is bad for macro. Just said AF isn't needed for macro. I can get an equally fast or faster shot without having to focus my lens at all by simply moving the camera in and out to focus, so speed isn't an issue. I've used AF for macro, and my manual technique has proven faster and more precise every time. To each their own. Simply trying to answer the OPs question about focusing using extension tubes. My point stands.

This little guy flew was hauling to get out of this flower, and flew away shortly after I took this shot.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Out.
 

shoturtle

 
Joined
Oct 15, 2010
Messages
823
Like I said modern AF will work just as good and even better in some cases then mf and focus by feet. And you do have shadow issues as you get close to your subject. Especially if you are not shooting back lite. It comes down to what your preferred.
 

icase81

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
67
Location
Philly, PA
I'm pretty sure it's you who are missing the point here - perhaps stopping to listen to what people here are trying to tell you would be more beneficial than arguing. You've been getting lots of good advice in this thread. You can focus any lens by physically moving it farther or closer to the object you're trying to photograph... It's called "focusing with your feet". People took macro photographs long before the application of electricity to cameras.
Why are you trying to talk down to me? You're not reading MY question properly. Unless there is power applied to the u4/3 lenses, you absolutely can not focus them manual or otherwise, short of moving yourself/the body of the camera. Telling me to manually focus the lens is like you asking me how to start your automatic car if the battery is dead, and I tell you to just pop start it. It physically can't be done. See what in saying here? The only way to focus the kit lens or the 40-150 is by turning the autofocus motor. No power means no focus ability. I'm also very open to other suggestions which is why I noted I do have a OM adapter and possible access to an Oly 50mm lens but I'm not yet sure if it is of the macro variety.

So again, before belittling me, try grasping the entirty of the question being asked instead of assuming I'm stupid and thought that the only way to focus a lens was with electric since the beginning of time.
 
Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Mu-43 is a fan site and not associated with Olympus, Panasonic, or other manufacturers mentioned on this site.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2009-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom