Anyone own an Olympus OM-20? Maybe you are key to a murder investigation!

PakkyT

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Can this camera solve the 36-year-old murder of a photographer?

Excerpt from article:

" "Shelley’s camera equipment has never been found, particularly an Olympus OM-20 camera, which cost £130 at the time," said Detective Sergeant Sarah Barnston, of the Major Crime Review Team. "This camera is still popular with collectors and photography students now. The missing 35mm camera will have the serial number 1032853 on it. "
 

PhotoCal

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A women was killed and you guys are cracking stupid jokes.
What if she was your daughter or mom?
Considering both are already dead your outrage falls flat. But I'll play along:

I'd laugh at any clever comments.

People are killed all the time, in all sorts of manner and in all locations. It's a shame, but not worth your attempts to stifle expression.
 

demiro

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Considering both are already dead your outrage falls flat. But I'll play along:

I'd laugh at any clever comments.

People are killed all the time, in all sorts of manner and in all locations. It's a shame, but not worth your attempts to stifle expression.
Maybe if you made a clever comment others would laugh as well.

People die of cancer way more often than by murder. Maybe you have some good freedom of expression lines about that as well you can share with us?
 

PhotoCal

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Here's an oldie:

How many cancer patients does it take to change a lightbulb?
Ten. One to change the lightbulb and nine to talk about how inspired they are.
 

CMYK

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Interesting for the Beach Altercation and this thead to mix. How quick emotions can build, how different sides and perspectives can be. How those who consider the various viewpoints might differ in life (worried about others - hold back), to those who focus on their own view (prioritise own needs - go getting).

Couple of decades back, my father died unexpectedly, and about 2/3 weeks later the Food Hygiene People called regarding a food complaint he had made (unrelated to death we understand) - we found it funny at the time, thinking perhaps they should act quicker to investigate suspected food poisoning, and also what use are they. Perhaps we should have told investigator ‘your too late’, we did think it. — On the same day of his death, it was snowing heavily, I had crashed company car on way to work (minor damage to bumper hitting a fence post on a bend) and drove home, thinking safer than driving the hour+ to work, and would work from home (laptop and dial up Internet). I saw my dad briefly, as he popped in and went back outside, he had office buildings at home, and he collapsed moments later in the quieter imaging area of the offices. Staff found him, I tried resuscitating, to no use, from memory it was a ruptured aorta. Ambulance took over an hour in the snow. A work colleague called me up, shortly after hearing about the crash to laugh at me and left a message on my mobile of pure laughter, I actually found it funny in its own right, but not at the time (was numb), just lousy timing, but not his fault. He didn’t know what to say to me for a while. He normal practical jokes were a bit more subdued after that, for a while at least. — But strangely, it was a lady in Sainsbury’s a week or so later, jumping the queue at the pharmacy, that saw me overreact. It was probably an honest mistake on her part. Wrong day on mine.
 
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Can this camera solve the 36-year-old murder of a photographer?

Excerpt from article:

" "Shelley’s camera equipment has never been found, particularly an Olympus OM-20 camera, which cost £130 at the time," said Detective Sergeant Sarah Barnston, of the Major Crime Review Team. "This camera is still popular with collectors and photography students now. The missing 35mm camera will have the serial number 1032853 on it. "
It's interesting to read about cases like this one. I actually have seen the picture of her somewhere a couple of years ago, but never really made a clear connection to the camera. Even if somebody actually notices the camera is in his/her collection, would it still be possible, after 36 years, that it holds a clear clue to the murderer? It would be amazing if it would really emerge from somebodies collection and could in fact lead, via several routes, to an important clue for solving this case.

At the same time it reminds me of the legacy which used, second hand camera gear can hold. Especially equipment which isn't just a couple of years, but rather dozens of years old. What stories it helped to document, what kind of tragedies it has witnessed? It is kind of an unsettling thought, imaging having a camera sitting silently on the shelve in my apartment, which belonged to a murdered person and I wouldn't even dare thinking of such a history related to the it. Maybe I'm getting sentimental here, unfortunately I can't help providing anything useful, the oldest camera in my possession actually is the E-M1 Mark I.
 

PhotoCal

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It's interesting to read about cases like this one. I actually have seen the picture of her somewhere a couple of years ago, but never really made a clear connection to the camera. Even if somebody actually notices the camera is in his/her collection, would it still be possible, after 36 years, that it holds a clear clue to the murderer? It would be amazing if it would really emerge from somebodies collection and could in fact lead, via several routes, to an important clue for solving this case.

At the same time it reminds me of the legacy which used, second hand camera gear can hold. Especially equipment which isn't just a couple of years, but rather dozens of years old. What stories it helped to document, what kind of tragedies it has witnessed? It is kind of an unsettling thought, imaging having a camera sitting silently on the shelve in my apartment, which belonged to a murdered person and I wouldn't even dare thinking of such a history related to the it. Maybe I'm getting sentimental here, unfortunately I can't help providing anything useful, the oldest camera in my possession actually is the E-M1 Mark I.
My first camera cost an arm and a leg. I try not to get blood on my gear, but occasionally I will get sweat. No tears.
 

PakkyT

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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
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Even if somebody actually notices the camera is in his/her collection, would it still be possible, after 36 years, that it holds a clear clue to the murderer?
I suspect that they are not so much interested in the camera itself holding any additional clues, but instead trying to trace the chain of possession. So asking who ever owns it now, where they got it from, then going to that place or person and asking again, etc.
 
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