An Editorial Introduction and an Opinion on the Strength of Micro Four Thirds

MZ1

New to Mu-43
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Jan 2, 2014
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Hong Kong
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Lawrence
Nice write! I've been lurking around in this forum a couple of months to find out if MFT works for me. Come New Years Day, I made the decision and switched from APS-C to MFT. Having gotten into photography for nearly a year I still consider myself a novice. Why? My Nikon gear was just so big and heavy that after a while, the thought of taking it out for day of shutter therapy was the last thing on my mind. I'm now into the 3rd day with my E-M1 and the shutter count is probably more than what I managed with the Nikon over the last 6 months. Today, the MFT menu caters for a wide variety of audiences and it certainly looks the more tasty with each turn of the page.
 

stratokaster

Mu-43 All-Pro
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Jan 4, 2011
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Dublin, IE
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Pavel
Nice write-up. I agree that comparisons of Micro 4/3 with other systems are mostly pointless, but the fact that Micro 4/3 gear even gets compared with full frame speaks worlds about the system.

By the way, another Russian pro using Micro 4/3 (he switched from full-frame Sony Alpha gear) is Ilya Varivchenko (also known as viv).

He posts lots of portraits on his blog: http://outlier-v.livejournal.com/ (Warning: some of the images are NSFW.)
 

Jay86

Mu-43 Veteran
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Dec 26, 2012
Messages
477
^^^ To further that, it seems to me that European's and folks out it in Asia have taken a stronger consideration to M43 gear for "pro" work then here in North America. Which actually kind of makes sense given North American folk's affinity for "larger things" (ex. cars) in general.

Napier, definitely liking your work and your posts in general. Your a well spoken/written man.
 

spatulaboy

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Jul 13, 2011
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North Carolina
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Vin
Napier you have a very unique style and I can always pick out your work just by looking at them. You've hit all the major points about m4/3 and why it is still relevant even with FF gear gaining popularity. I'll be in the NJ/NYC area in the spring, let me know if you are interested in hanging out!
 

fortwodriver

Mu-43 All-Pro
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Nov 15, 2013
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Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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Frank
Horses for courses of course. I remember a time when nobody used 35mm for pro studio portraits. Then in the late 90s and early 2000s I noticed some guys using 35mm in their studios instead of the ubiquitous Mamiya MF systems. Often with weird films (for portraiture) like E100VS and anything that would make the shot "edgy". All of a sudden portraits got grainy, flashy (a little hot lighting-wise) and there was a lot of emphasis on using those giant ring-flash units.

There was definitely a difference in the look obtained which I didn't find all that attractive.

I don't find the difference in studio-portraiture between full-frame and m43 to be all that different. If your lighting is good, you generally get a good portrait. The seemingly large DR the larger sensors provide doesn't always help with pictures of people.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Joined
Mar 17, 2011
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6,304
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Southwest Virginia
Real Name
Steve
As I've noted before, the numbers indicate that the American and Japanese camera markets have roughly the same percentage of DSLRs. The difference is mainly that the Americans who don't buy DSLRs stick with smartphones or low end P&S cameras rather than upgrade to mu43 or more serious compacts. I really think the more accurate explanation about the low mirrorless numbers in the US is a lack of upgrading rather than an obsession with larger DSLRs.
 

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