an ancient tree

Discussion in 'Nature' started by nickthetasmaniac, Feb 17, 2013.

  1. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    • Like Like x 11
  2. yourguitarhero

    yourguitarhero Mu-43 Regular

    78
    Jul 29, 2011
    Trees can be incredible.
    This yew is 10,000 years old:
    [​IMG]
    It's in a wee village in the Scottish highlands.

    Imagine our ancestors in 8000BC
     
  3. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    Is that the 'Fortingall Yew? If so I hate to burst your bubble but recent research would suggest it's about 2000 years old - still mighty impressive but not quite 10,000 :wink:
     
  4. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    • Like Like x 1
  5. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    I'd be damn careful with wikipedia and trees... Having just done a heap of searching I've found various Wikipedia articles to say at least 5 different trees are the oldest on the planet :confused:

    In the same article they say there's a clump of Huon Pines in Tasmania with individual specimens believed to be 3-4000yrs old, but then none of them are listed in the individual list, despite some of the listed specimens being as young as 1500...

    Wikipedia, gotta love it :smile:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Agreed - it was just a convenient link, and the core samples and actual data ARE true
     
  7. jimr.pdx

    jimr.pdx Mu-43 Veteran

    342
    Dec 5, 2010
    near Longview ~1hr from PDX
    Jim R
    My "big ol' tree" image from 2004 (check out people & benches in lower left!), and the wiki story - massive and old, but its age estimates cover a mighty big range!

    Oaxaca%2520069.

    Arbol_del_Tule near Oaxaca MX

    Love your pine image though, cameras have come a long way since my '04 Kodak L443...
     
  8. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    That is a rather big trunk! From what I can gather it gets hard to get a solid age for older trees because as the heart-wood dies it becomes impossibly to get an accurate core sample for growth-rings. Apparently when they aged the Huons' I mentioned, they used a sample of pollen from the sediment layers in a nearby lake - buggered if I know how that works...

    For those interested - the Pencil Pine I posted a picture of isn't actually a pine at all, it's more closely related to the sequoias of North America. The 'pine' part of the common name is just another example of early Europeans trying to create a point of reference to home.
     
  9. RevBob

    RevBob Super Moderator

    Jun 4, 2011
    NorthWestern PA
    Bob
  10. aragorn1980

    aragorn1980 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    698
    Aug 10, 2012
    Athens Greece
    Takis
    Beautiful shots! Well done!