Aftermarket grip for Em5 mkiii

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The Oly one was perfect. It was still usable (same remote) when they had their DSLRs (like the E-520). But alas, they eliminated it from the OMD cameras. It might be a size thing, but my 3MP Oly super-zoom was smaller than even an E-M10, so you'd think they could squeeze the rmote technology into an OMD. The batteries last forever, they aren't finicky, etc. I still use my Canon remote (actually a cheapo B&H knock-off) for my 80D - in fact, I used it to take the pictures above. Oh well, progress marches on...
I think nowadays companies just think "why getting a specific wireless remote as everybody has a phone?"
So we end up with poorly coded apps that don't work as well as they should...

The few times I used the RM-1 (or the cheaper RM-2) it was not all that usable. I found for the typical family holiday portrait, the RM-1 just did not have the range to fire the camera with me with the rest of the family. I had to fall back to the n-second timer, clicking the shutter and running to get in the picture.
For this use, I find the custom self timer function great. I give it 10 seconds + 10 shots.
 

Michael Meissner

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I think nowadays companies just think "why getting a specific wireless remote as everybody has a phone?"
So we end up with poorly coded apps that don't work as well as they should...


For this use, I find the custom self timer function great. I give it 10 seconds + 10 shots.
The camera I used in that time period in the early 2000's (most like C-2100UZ) only a had a single self-timer (10 seconds), and you could not select shooting multiple pictures with it.
 
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The grip seems fine but with the l bracket part it seems to be difficult to rotate the screen.
It seems to be made to put the l bracket part on and off each time you need it . The good point is that this part is quite small.
 

Holoholo55

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The grip seems fine but with the l bracket part it seems to be difficult to rotate the screen.
It seems to be made to put the l bracket part on and off each time you need it . The good point is that this part is quite small.
I think the L-plate can be dismounted like other similar brackets. The L-plate obstructs the display in the other brackets too. Even the RRS bracket gets in the way. I would probably use it the same way. Keep the L-plate off until needed. Would stash it and the Allen wrench somewhere handy in the camera bag. I'm most interested in the accessory grip and Arca-Swiss rails on the bottom. He also makes the point that the bracket spreads the load of the tripod mount across the entire bottom of the camera.
 
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Some others can be mounted further from the body, or more in front of the camera, to help the use with the lcd screen.
Anyway, not sure it's really usable anyway.

what I'm more interested in is the arca mounts (both base and L) ans I don't care much about the extra grip.
It's also probably too big with the base plate to be used with my current camera bags so the bracket itself would be mounted and unmounted on each spot I have to use the tripod.
 

RAH

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It is somewhat similar to the Fittest grip, except that it is a little lighter in weight, and also, as mentioned by @SojiOkita , the l-bracket does not seem to be adjustable, relying on the opening at the top to allow cables etc, to enter. Also, it is $55 instead of $35 for the Fittest (with a long wait).

On the plus side, it only has one bolt holding the L-bracket part, and Rob Trek says it is easy to deal with. The Fittest has 2, which is stonger, I suppose, but more of a juggling act to take on and off. But also, as I said, the Fittest can be adjusted closer and farther from the body, which I think is a big advantage.

Speaking of the L-bracket, it seems to me, @SojiOkita , that ANY l-bracket would get in the way of any swiveling screen (except maybe that Fuji screen I've seen mentioned that seems to be incredibly rotatable). So it isn't a fault of these grips/l-bracket accessories, it is the nature of having a swiveling screen attached to that side of the camera body (and it has to be on that side, I should think). Right?
 
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Speaking of the L-bracket, it seems to me, @SojiOkita , that ANY l-bracket would get in the way of any swiveling screen (except maybe that Fuji screen I've seen mentioned that seems to be incredibly rotatable). So it isn't a fault of these grips/l-bracket accessories, it is the nature of having a swiveling screen attached to that side of the camera body (and it has to be on that side, I should think). Right?
yes... That's what the Haoge solution with one bolt could be handy - even if I'd prefer 2 bolts to one.
It's possible that I buy both anyway :) just to be able to compare.
For now, my 3 legged thing bracket is also perfectly usable so there's absolutely no urgency.
But that's not because I don't need one that I won't buy one (or two :) ).
 
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On the fittest bracket, you can umount the vertical plate also with one screw.
However, you end up with a deteched L plate (with a vertical & horizontal part) which is much bigger than on the Hagoe.

Considering the price of the fittest bracket, it's probably the one l'll buy first.
 

GBarrington

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I have the Oly grip, but just ordered that Haoge grip. I was going to buy an L bracket anyway, so this didn't cost much more. I will do a compare and contrast when it arrives.
 

GBarrington

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I received the Haoge grip for the E-M5 III from Amazon in 2 days. t's around $55 (US) on Amazon. This will be a bit of a compare and contrast between it and the Olympus branded grip, which I also own.

I was going to buy a quick release "L" bracket for use on my tripod. But this was only a bit more expensive than the 'better' (i.e. more expensive) "L" brackets, so I thought I'd give it a try.

It seems well built, and of higher quality than my FotoDiox grip that I bought for my E-M10, whose build quality was fine, but not outstanding. The Olympus Grip is extremely well built, and while it feels a bit more 'upscale' than the Haoge, and with one exception, I don't think there is a significant difference between the two in overall build quality.

The removable vertical mount is attached to the main body of the grip by a single screw, however, there are 2 pins extending from the vertical mount that fit into sockets in the main body of the grip as well. For those concerned about just a single screw holding it together, I would judge it adequate to the task. Those pins will keep the vertical mount from rotating around the screw and loosening it. The Oly grip has no vertical or horizontal quick release "L" bracket.

With the vertical mount installed the fully articulated screen can not be used, so you will need to flip the screen so the display side is exposed before you attach the grip. The Olympus grip does not interfere with the articulated screen at all.

All the screws in the Haoge require a hex wrench to tighten and release, even the tripod mount, which is not 'knurled' for easy hand turning. This allows the user to hand tighten to an extreme and possibly dangerous degree. But it has always been possible to overtighten the tripod mount on most devices like this, but a proper tightening of the screw means that over time, it works itself loose with use.

The Olympus grip's Tripod mount screw can't even be turned directly by hand. Instead, in the back at the base of the Oly grip, there is a little thumb dial that you push left or right to turn the screw. I was originally put off by it, but as I used it, I came to appreciate it. I've found it virtually impossible to over tighten the mounting screw, and when the grip starts to feel a bit 'loose and wobbly', I can quickly re-tighten it with my thumb without turning the camera over, and getting out the hex wrench to tighten it.

One feature I really like with the Haoge grip that the Olympus grip has no equivalent of is that as the camera faces you, on the right-hand side (Stage right for theater majors) there is a tiny little vertical lip. My thinking is that it helps transfer some torque normally applied to the tripod mount to the right side of the frame.

Fully assembled, the Haoge grip weighs 126 grams. with the vertical mount removed so that just the grip is attached, it weighs 103 grams. The Olympus grip weighs 121 grams. So both grips weigh in at roughly 4 ounces. You won't notice any difference between the two in terms of weight. If you do, you are far more sensitive to weight, than I am!

The Haoge leaves a very tiny little gap between the camera base and the grip base. I can actually see a tiny strip of light between the two when I hold the combined devices up to the light. My suspicion is that the little depressions in the grip base don't match up perfectly with those little 'nubs' on the base of the camera (to prevent lateral movement of the grip.) It doesn't seem to affect how well the grip attaches to the camera body, but I do worry that it might make a user have to check the tripod mount screw, more often. The Olympus grip has no such gap, and even if it did, tightening the tripod mount screw doesn't interfere with the shooting flow of work.

The Haoge has markings, both vertical and horizontal to indicate where the center of the sensor plane is (i.e. the film plane). The Olympus does not. It's fairly convenient to have, however, I wonder how accurate the vertical markings are when that little gap is factored in.

Overall, I think the Olympus grip is much more comfortable to use as a grip, while I think the Haoge is the grip I would take if I expected to be using a tripod quite a bit. But I think I could get used to the Haoge and not miss the Oly grip. Edit: I will probably use the Oly grip as a walkaround grip, it's more comfortable to use, and I already own it!

The Haoge grip is a third of the price of the Olympus grip, and in some ways does more.

Edit: One last thing, the Haoge allows the user to change the battery without removing the grip, that is VERY nice! The Oly grip does not.
 
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Darmok N Jalad

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I received the Haoge grip for the E-M5 III from Amazon in 2 days. t's around $55 (US) on Amazon. This will be a bit of a compare and contrast between it and the Olympus branded grip, which I also own.

I was going to buy a quick release "L" bracket for use on my tripod. But this was only a bit more expensive than the 'better' (i.e. more expensive) "L" brackets, so I thought I'd give it a try.

It seems well built, and of higher quality than my FotoDiox grip that I bought for my E-M10, whose build quality was fine, but not outstanding. The Olympus Grip is extremely well built, and while it feels a bit more 'upscale' than the Haoge, and with one exception, I don't think there is a significant difference between the two in overall build quality.

The removable vertical mount is attached to the main body of the grip by a single screw, however, there are 2 pins extending from the vertical mount that fit into sockets in the main body of the grip as well. For those concerned about just a single screw holding it together, I would judge it adequate to the task. Those pins will keep the vertical mount from rotating around the screw and loosening it. The Oly grip has no vertical or horizontal quick release "L" bracket.

With the vertical mount installed the fully articulated screen can not be used, so you will need to flip the screen so the display side is exposed before you attach the grip. The Olympus grip does not interfere with the articulated screen at all.

All the screws in the Haoge require a hex wrench to tighten and release, even the tripod mount, which is not 'knurled' for easy hand turning. This allows the user to hand tighten to an extreme and possibly dangerous degree. But it has always been possible to overtighten the tripod mount on most devices like this, but a proper tightening of the screw means that over time, it works itself loose with use.

The Olympus grip's Tripod mount screw can't even be turned directly by hand. Instead, in the back at the base of the Oly grip, there is a little thumb dial that you push left or right to turn the screw. I was originally put off by it, but as I used it, I came to appreciate it. I've found it virtually impossible to over tighten the mounting screw, and when the grip starts to feel a bit 'loose and wobbly', I can quickly re-tighten it with my thumb without turning the camera over, and getting out the hex wrench to tighten it.

One feature I really like with the Haoge grip that the Olympus grip has no equivalent of is that as the camera faces you, on the right-hand side (Stage right for theater majors) there is a tiny little vertical lip. My thinking is that it helps transfer some torque normally applied to the tripod mount to the right side of the frame.

Fully assembled, the Haoge grip weighs 126 grams. with the vertical mount removed so that just the grip is attached, it weighs 103 grams. The Olympus grip weighs 121 grams. So both grips weigh in at roughly 4 ounces. You won't notice any difference between the two in terms of weight. If you do, you are far more sensitive to weight, than I am!

The Haoge leaves a very tiny little gap between the camera base and the grip base. I can actually see a tiny strip of light between the two when I hold the combined devices up to the light. My suspicion is that the little depressions in the grip base don't match up perfectly with those little 'nubs' on the base of the camera (to prevent lateral movement of the grip.) It doesn't seem to affect how well the grip attaches to the camera body, but I do worry that it might make a user have to check the tripod mount screw, more often. The Olympus grip has no such gap, and even if it did, tightening the tripod mount screw doesn't interfere with the shooting flow of work.

The Haoge has markings, both vertical and horizontal to indicate where the center of the sensor plane is (i.e. the film plane). The Olympus does not. It's fairly convenient to have, however, I wonder how accurate the vertical markings are when that little gap is factored in.

Overall, I think the Olympus grip is much more comfortable to use as a grip, while I think the Haoge is the grip I would take if I expected to be using a tripod quite a bit. But I think I could get used to the Haoge and not miss the Oly grip.

The Haoge grip is a third of the price of the Olympus grip, and in some ways does more.
What is the product link on Amazon US? I searched for Haoge E-M5 mk III grip and got nothing.
 
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With the vertical mount installed the fully articulated screen can not be used, so you will need to flip the screen so the display side is exposed before you attach the grip.
You can't move it at all?
Is it easy to put the L-bracket on/off?

I think I prefer the Hoage grip to the Fittest because the L-plate part is smaller.
On my current plate (3legged thing) the L-part is big and it goes in the way of my camera strap, I'd prefer to avoid this.
 

GBarrington

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You can't move it at all?
Is it easy to put the L-bracket on/off?
Very easy to remove, IF you have access to the included hex wrench or another of the same size. It's fully functional without the vertical mount. You can even remove the grip part and use it like an "L" bracket.

I've disassembled mine and placed it in the carrying bag my tripod came in. I expect I will only use it during the times when I expect to use the tripod, but I am not certain of that. The Olympus branded grip is much more comfortable to use day to day, I think.

I think I prefer the Hoage grip to the Fittest because the L-plate part is smaller.
On my current plate (3legged thing) the L-part is big and it goes in the way of my camera strap, I'd prefer to avoid this.
Yes it is designed specifically for the E-M5 III. It takes up very little room, overall.
 

fStop16

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In reply to GBarrington
You are absolutely correct in all your findings. I think the rubberized portion around the camera is a little raised. That plus the non-grip on the bracket does not allow it to fit flush. There are little dimples on the bracket, but they are to large and not deep enough for the bracket to line up with the bottom of the camera.
 
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Holoholo55

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My Haoge finally came in today. It looks nice and came with a microfiber cloth and Allen wrench. Fits very snugly, although there is a little gap between the bottom of the camera and the bracket as @GBarrington noted. I don't think it's because the pits were too shallow, because the nubs on the bottom of the camera don't seem to be bottoming out in the pits. However, the fit is good and it feels very solid. I didn't tighten it very hard, but it feels solid. No rocking. The accessory grip feels good and no problem getting the battery out of the bottom.

I won't repeat the photos or videos that show it pretty well already.

However, there is one weird quirk. For some reason, Haoge left a ledge on the L-vertical that directly affects the hinge for the rear display. As you can see here, the ledge is right over the hinge and prevents the display from opening more than about 20 deg. You can see it in the photo. WDH?

If I cut off that protrusion, I'd be able to open the display to around 90 deg., but no further. Taking the vertical off solves that, of course. I'm OK with flipping the display around so it faces outward when it's folded in, but why in the world did they have that protruding ledge there? I'm gonna have to find my Dremel and cut that bugger off.

For @SojiOkita. The vertical does not interfere with the camera strap lug. The Fittest vertical comes up pretty high and there is some interference.

Although I would probably use this bracket without the vertical most of the time, this is an oddity I can't explain. Of course, it was staring me in the face from the start and I didn't realize what it meant. Doh...

Update: I sent an email to Haoge and got a response regarding the ledge. Move forward a few messages. I decided not to cut off the ledge.
 

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GBarrington

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My Haoge finally came in today. It looks nice and came with a microfiber cloth and Allen wrench. Fits very snugly, although there is a little gap between the bottom of the camera and the bracket as @GBarrington noted. I don't think it's because the pits were too shallow, because the nubs on the bottom of the camera don't seem to be bottoming out in the pits. However, the fit is good and it feels very solid. I didn't tighten it very hard, but it feels solid. No rocking. The accessory grip feels good and no problem getting the battery out of the bottom.

I won't repeat the photos or videos that show it pretty well already.

However, there is one weird quirk. For some reason, Haoge left a ledge on the L-vertical that directly affects the hinge for the rear display. As you can see here, the ledge is right over the hinge and prevents the display from opening more than about 20 deg. You can see it in the photo. WDH?

If I cut off that protrusion, I'd be able to open the display to around 90 deg., but no further. Taking the vertical off solves that, of course. I'm OK with flipping the display around so it faces outward when it's folded in, but why in the world did they have that protruding ledge there? I'm gonna have to find my Dremel and cut that bugger off.

For @SojiOkita. The vertical does not interfere with the camera strap lug. The Fittest vertical comes up pretty high and there is some interference.

Although I would probably use this bracket without the vertical most of the time, this is an oddity I can't explain. Of course, it was staring me in the face from the start and I didn't realize what it meant. Doh...
I just assumed that little ledge provided stability for the vertical.
 
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