Aftermarket grip for Em5 mkiii

Holoholo55

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Yes, I forgot to list the E-m1 mark III in the list. I actually waited until I could get my hands on the E-m1 mark III before buying the E-m5 mark III, because some of the initial leaks/chatter mentioned an improved viewfinder. Well that chatter was wrong, it is the same viewfinder as in the E-m1 mark II.

I had mentally budgeted enough to buy the E-m1 mark III, and when it came down, and I picked the E-m5 mark III due to the viewfinder, I decided to also buy a refurbished 12-200mm f/3.5-6.3 at the Olympus outlet sale. For a walk-around lens, the 12-200mm now replaces the 14-150mm mark II that I had previously used, but the 12-200mm is heavy enough that I could see the benefit of a larger grip.

However, I still think the Olympus grip price is too high for what it is. If it had an extra battery, headphone support, and an external power plug like the HLD-8, it would be worth the price.
Yeah, for around $160, the Olympus grip only offered a grip extension and the shutter release. Nothing else. That wasn't enough to make it worth it for me. Waiting for my Haoge grip to come in.
 

Holoholo55

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I tend to agree with a comment I saw once -

If you need a grip for the EM5 or 10 then you should have bought an EM1 (insert the i, ii, iii as required)

Not helpful I know but it's true in so many cases.
Not arguing with that, and if I had to limit myself to one body, it would be the EM1.3. However, the EM5.3 is like an 1.3 but smaller and lighter, yet adaptable to larger lenses with an accessory grip. I have an 1.3, but the 5.3 is great when I want a smaller, lighter kit and a backup for the 1.3. It gives me options.
 
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Yeah, for around $160, the Olympus grip only offered a grip extension and the shutter release. Nothing else. That wasn't enough to make it worth it for me. Waiting for my Haoge grip to come in.
Yeah, I tested it, it's very comfortable.
But expensive. And no Arca plate included (even a single plate would be good, like on the Pen-F grip).
I bought the Oly grip for my E-M10 but almost never used it, I'm not going to make the same mistake for the E-M5.3.

I don't have big lenses (my bigger one is the 12-45 f/4) so what I need, mostly, is an Arca base to be able to get easily horizontal and vertical shots on a tripod.
 

Holoholo55

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Here's some shots from my friend Curtis of the Fittest bracket on his EM5 III. He said that it makes using bigger lenses more comfortable. Photos used with his permission.

https://flic.kr/p/2jeHbFP
https://flic.kr/p/2jeD49Z
https://flic.kr/p/2jeu2L4
https://flic.kr/p/2jerdNs
My friend let me try his 5.3 with the Fittest bracket on. It fit well and felt good. The accessory grip was just right to fill the gap in the fingers when you have them curled around the front of the camera and your fingertips are gripping the inside edge of the body's grip. At least when I grip the 5.3 I can see a tunnel between my fingers and the front part of the 5.3's native grip. The vertical plate looked a little flimsy in the photos, but in reality it felt quite sturdy. There is a tiny bit of flex, but not something that would be a problem if the camera is in portrait mode with a reasonably sized lens on it. If you were using a 40-150 Pro or 300 f4 Pro, of course you should be using the tripod foot anyway. My friend said he plans to use the bracket with the vertical plate removed unless needed for a tripod. It is rather tall and a big harder to fit into a bag. It is nice that they have a magnetic slot for the Allen wrench, which keeps it handy for mounting the camera and for reattaching the vertical plate.
 

RAH

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I received my Fittest E-M5III bracket from Ebay (ordered 6/1; received today, 6/30) . I was going to take some pictures, but the pics from @Holoholo55 's friend are very good and helpful.

The bracket is better than the old version I have for my E-M10II for one major reason - it does not make it more difficult to press the shutter button with your right index finger. The grip on the Fittest bracket for the E-M10II came all the way up to the top of the camera, getting in the way of your index finger. Several people on this forum (including me) complained about this, so it wasn't just me with my small hands. I essentially could not use the grip part of that accessory, it was so bothersome.

However, with the bracket for the E-M5III, the grip part only goes about 3/4 of the way to the top, so there is room for your 2nd finger to hold it there and your index finger is completely unimpeded and free to press the shutter. You can see it clearly in the top photo above, and see how your hand is positioned in the 2nd photo. They must have rethought this design and kudos to them!! I think the grip would be excellent for use with heavier lenses.

As far as how well the bracket supports the bottom of the camera (for help guarding the tripod hole on the camera), well there is no supporting "ridge" on the front of the bracket at the point where the camera's hole is located (and the bracket attaches), which I was kind of hoping for. It is just flush. There are the 2 "ears" that stick up in front of the camera on either side of the lens (hard to see in the photos, but clearly seen on Ebay), so they offer some support. Also, and obviously, the entire bottom of the camera is supported by the plate, so I figure that has to give a fair amount of support as compared to even a large regular arca-swiss plate.

Here are the weights of all the parts, plus a totals of the device assembled (the bolts add some weight):

grip part: 31g
l-bracket part: 21g
bottom plate: 94g

bottom + grip assembled: 128g
entire item assembled: 154g

So, for us USA folks, that's:
bottom + grip assembled: 4.5 oz
entire item assembled: 5.4 oz

The right-hand strap support as per usual gets in the way of the grip somewhat and makes dealing with that lug even worse, but that's Olympus' fault for putting the damn thing there. Grrr! (hard to know where else to put it, but it's still annoying and I like to whine).

Only other thing is that it's really nice that the allen wrench for the bracket's various bolts has a place in the bottom of the plate to store it. However, I KNOW I would lose it if I ever carried it around like that (it's held by magnets). I suppose you could put some tape over it, but I think I'd just carry it in my camera bag.
 

RAH

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Is it possible to rotate the LCD screen with the L-plate attached?
My initial thought was no, but it turns out that you can. With the L-plate fully in (against the body of the camera), you are somewhat limited. You cannot fold the screen out the entire way (if you think of 180 as the full way, so the folded out screen is in the same plain as the back of the camera, like an extension of it). You can get to maybe 160. If you have the screen at 90 you can tilt it any way.
Edit: you CAN fold the screen out fully by adjusting the l-plate bolts to a 2nd position (see post below).

If you pull the L-plate out all the way (so it's about 1.25" from the camera body), you can fold the screen out to almost 180). You can also tilt it pretty much any way you want if the screen is at the 90 position. So you'd tilt it first and then fold it open more.
Edit: you CAN fold the screen out fully by adjusting the l-plate bolts to a 2nd position (see post below).

It's hard to describe, but let's say you wanted to take a selfie. Yes, you could open the screen up enough to face the other way and you could see the screen from the front (the bracket would obscure your view some, of course). But it wouldn't be fully 180, so depending on where you were, I suppose you might not see yourself on the screen.

Edit: you CAN fold the screen out fully by adjusting the l-plate bolts to a 2nd position (see post below).

With the L-plate pulled out from the camera you can tilt the screen somewhat more easily too because the edges of the screen do not hit the edge of the L-plate as soon because it is farther away from the camera.

The one thing it would be hard to do is to open the screen up full (to 180) and then tilt it up or down greatly. You have to fold it in some in order to give you room to tilt it. If you fold it out to about say 100 (a little beyond a right-angle), you can tilt the screen up or down fully without hitting the edge of the bracket.

Hope this helps.
 
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RAH

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RRS makes a L Bracket for EM5 MK III. A little expesive , but the "L" bracket seems adjustable.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/prod...set_l_plate_set_for_olympus.html?sts=pi&pim=Y
That bracket seems LESS flexible than the Fittest I reviewed. It doesn't look as though you can pull the l-plate away from the body (it's always directly against it). Otherwise, it impedes the screen movement the same way the Fittest does (somewhat but not awful)- @SojiOkita , you could look at the pics on the link for the RRS bracket and get an idea.
 

Holoholo55

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That bracket seems LESS flexible than the Fittest I reviewed. It doesn't look as though you can pull the l-plate away from the body (it's always directly against it). Otherwise, it impedes the screen movement the same way the Fittest does (somewhat but not awful)- @SojiOkita , you could look at the pics on the link for the RRS bracket and get an idea.
If you go to the RRS site, you can see that their 5.3 bracket has a two position vertical. You can move it into the 2nd position which allows the screen to open fully. However, it doesn't look it can rotate in that position. You can rotate it first and then open it up.

Attached image borrowed from RRS site. https://www.reallyrightstuff.com/olympus-em1-plates_3

However, what put me off about the RRS bracket is that there's no accessory grip. That's one of the things I need to enable the 5.3 to handle lenses like the 12-100 and 40-150 Pro. Otherwise, I would have bought it.
 

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RAH

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If you go to the RRS site, you can see that their 5.3 bracket has a two position vertical. You can move it into the 2nd position which allows the screen to open fully. However, it doesn't look it can rotate in that position. You can rotate it first and then open it up.

Attached image borrowed from RRS site. https://www.reallyrightstuff.com/olympus-em1-plates_3

However, what put me off about the RRS bracket is that there's no accessory grip. That's one of the things I need to enable the 5.3 to handle lenses like the 12-100 and 40-150 Pro. Otherwise, I would have bought it.
Hey, that's interesting. It's interesting because when I look at the Fittest L-plate, it also has the ability to move that plate into 2 different positions. It's not as much as the RRS, but it's not just "play" in the bolt configuration. There is like about .25" slide where you can position the plate in or out. Well, I had it in exactly the wrong position which would impeded the screen from opening fully. When I moved it towards the front of the camera fully, the screen DOES open to fully 180. @SojiOkita , please read this because it is of interest to your question.

I do think the Fittest ability to move the entire L-plate away from the camera is an advantage. In this respect it is like a "universal" plate that requires that ability to fit different cameras. The Fittest fits exactly on the E-M5III when the L-plat eis fully in, but you can slide it out and gain some room for cables, easier screen movement, etc. The RRS L-bracket is mainly relying on that open top to allow you some flexibility in attaching cables, etc, but it would be less flexible, i think. Of course, you lose a little stability when you move the plate away from the camera.
 
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Thanks for all the info.
In fact, I think there is no perfect configuration for the E-M5.3. It's almost impossible, due to the swivel screen.

My "dream" configuration for a photo shoot where I know I'm going to use my tripod a lot, would be: L bracket on, no restriction on the LCD use.
So I can use it handheld or on the tripod, without any change.
Most of the time, when I need to tilt the screen handheld, I want it up or down for lanscape orientation. On the E-M5, it means, folded out at 180°, and the rotated up and down.
This would not be possible with a L-bracket.

So, I think the only solution for me is to have the base plate of the bracket on, and to mount/unmount the L-bracket part when I'm using the tripod or not.

This plus the position of the wired remote socket make it quite unconvenient to take pictures on a tripod with the E-M5.3
(I'd always need to bend the screen up to be able to see something confortably).

However, due to the virus, I never had the chance to test the configuration in real conditions... so I may find out something that works well when I'd really need it.
And it's probable that I'd try the Fittiest bracket... as it's not so expensive and it seems a very good option.
 

RAH

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So I can use it handheld or on the tripod, without any change.
Most of the time, when I need to tilt the screen handheld, I want it up or down for lanscape orientation. On the E-M5, it means, folded out at 180°, and the rotated up and down.
This would not be possible with a L-bracket.
...
And it's probable that I'd try the Fittiest bracket... as it's not so expensive and it seems a very good option.
Well, now you've done it! ;) I hauled out my humongous Canon 80D and taken a few quick and dirty pics to try to show that you can kind of rotate the screen up and down even with the L-bracket on it. It's not perfect, but you CAN see the screen, probably enough for framing, etc. I have also included a shot of the end of the bracket, showing the small amount of adjustment that can be made to it to slide it towards the front of the camera to allow the rear LCD to fold out completely.
I agree that for the price, it's worth giving it a try!

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Michael Meissner

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This plus the position of the wired remote socket make it quite unconvenient to take pictures on a tripod with the E-M5.3
(I'd always need to bend the screen up to be able to see something confortably).
Well there is the option to use the phone remote instead of the wired shutter release. That way you can angle the phone any way you want and you don't have a cable running to the camera that could pull it down. I've done this for cameras aimed at the bird feeders, and I can stay inside out of view of the birds and the furry birds (squirrels).

I find however, the phone app doesn't work as well for doing fireworks. There I much prefer having the wired shutter release and the camera in landscape orientation mode, and being able to sit in a chair and watch the fireworks naturally. I will glance at the LCD every so often, but I don't have to switch focus from far to near, and/or lose the night vision as I look at the screen.
 
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Well there is the option to use the phone remote instead of the wired shutter release. That way you can angle the phone any way you want and you don't have a cable running to the camera that could pull it down. I've done this for cameras aimed at the bird feeders, and I can stay inside out of view of the birds and the furry birds (squirrels).

I find however, the phone app doesn't work as well for doing fireworks. There I much prefer having the wired shutter release and the camera in landscape orientation mode, and being able to sit in a chair and watch the fireworks naturally. I will glance at the LCD every so often, but I don't have to switch focus from far to near, and/or lose the night vision as I look at the screen.
I don't like having the image on the phone, and I only recently discovered that you can use the phone only as a shutter release (with the image still on the camera's LCD). I'll certainly try this.
However, from experience, when using the tripod at the end of the day (for sunsets or night shots), my phone is crying to get a charge :) So I'll take the cable remote anyway.
(when I forget it, there's still the 2" timer).
 

RAH

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Back in the early days of Olympus point-and-shoots and super-zooms (like 3MP models), Oly had a small remote, much like the remote that STILL can be used with Canon DSLRs:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0037NX6JY

The Oly one was perfect. It was still usable (same remote) when they had their DSLRs (like the E-520). But alas, they eliminated it from the OMD cameras. It might be a size thing, but my 3MP Oly super-zoom was smaller than even an E-M10, so you'd think they could squeeze the rmote technology into an OMD. The batteries last forever, they aren't finicky, etc. I still use my Canon remote (actually a cheapo B&H knock-off) for my 80D - in fact, I used it to take the pictures above. Oh well, progress marches on...
 

Michael Meissner

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The Oly one was perfect. It was still usable (same remote) when they had their DSLRs (like the E-520). But alas, they eliminated it from the OMD cameras. It might be a size thing, but my 3MP Oly super-zoom was smaller than even an E-M10, so you'd think they could squeeze the rmote technology into an OMD. The batteries last forever, they aren't finicky, etc. I still use my Canon remote (actually a cheapo B&H knock-off) for my 80D - in fact, I used it to take the pictures above. Oh well, progress marches on...
The few times I used the RM-1 (or the cheaper RM-2) it was not all that usable. I found for the typical family holiday portrait, the RM-1 just did not have the range to fire the camera with me with the rest of the family. I had to fall back to the n-second timer, clicking the shutter and running to get in the picture.

And when I was doing static shots with the camera on the tripod where I wanted to re-arrange things, i.e. take a picture, chimp, re-adjust, etc. having to move my hand so the RM-1 was in front of the camera in order to shoot was annoying.
 
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