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Advice Needed - To sell or not to sell

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by acl38355, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. acl38355

    acl38355 New to Mu-43

    8
    Jan 6, 2013
    West TN
    I am looking for some advice.
    I bought a new Pany G3 with the kit lens about a month ago. It is small for my hands and do have trouble with some of the buttons. The pics look good inside but when I shoot outdoors, I can't tell much difference between this G3 and my Fuji HS30.

    So I have now bought (3) legacy lenses: a 28mm Quantaray, a 28-70 Vivitar and a 80-200 Tokina. I'm just not seeing the hoped-for improvements.

    My question is this: will this camera take as good of photos as a full size DSLR, such as a Sony A37 or such? Am I missing something? I really don't want to spend $300-$500 on m4/3 lenses.
     
  2. sge998

    sge998 Mu-43 Regular

    37
    Jan 14, 2013
    San Francisco, CA
    It all comes down to what results you are expecting from the G3. It is a perfectly capable camera to produce outstanding photos. If you are not seeing any difference between your P&S and G3 then there must be something wrong with either the way you shoot, see or it might have to do with the under-performing lenses.

    In my opinion, the lenses in your current setup are quite weak. In order to get better results you are bound to invest into the native lenses. For example, what is the point of buying a super camera and only put on a weak kit lens? (You are not using the camera to its full potential) I suggest you check your photos to see what is your favorite focal length (prime or zoom) and we can help you to find a better lens.

    I hope this helps :)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Legacy zooms do not perform, and neither do the cheapest legacy primes. Not sure what you expected out of them. High quality legacy primes would be different. You would get the same performance out of the same lenses on a DSLR. The presence or lack of a mirrorbox has no bearing on the quality of your images. A camera relies on optics.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    I assume that you have shot previously with P&S camera therefor you use Out Of Camera (OOC) JPG. My suggestion adds to sge998 learn the camera and do it while shooting RAW+JPG. Using RAW will enable you fixing mistakes you have made whle learning from the mistakes. The embedded JPG will allow you to use OOC JPG when needed. Regarding lens you can start cheap, get a sigma 19/30 in the 200 bundle or get the P14 on ebay for 170$ both options will give you relatively fast quality lenses.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Ulfric M Douglas

    Ulfric M Douglas Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 6, 2010
    Northumberland
    Without spending at least $300 on lenses you might be stuck : in the exact same place as with an APS-C DSLR.

    As for a "full size DSLR" ... you don't really mean the BIG ones do you? $$$

    The G3 sensor is very similar to the sensor in the cheaper DSLRs you are imagining.
    Lenses are the key.
    Your unfortunate choice of completely crummy old lenses has left you unimpressed.
    Go buy an old 50mmF1.8 Pentax/Cosina/Konica lens and try that instead.
     
  6. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    Higher quality will cost more than a couple hundred bucks. Spend more on glass than you do on the camera body.

    That said, you can get cheap but very good primes - the Panasonic 14/2.5 and 20/1.7 can be had for less than 500 (combined) if purchased second hand (buy/sell here or eBay), and will outperform the kit lens and definitely the old so-so legacy glass you have.

    There are also deals to be had with legacy glass - think Pentax, Olympus, Nikon fast 50's (F1.4, F1.8 is OK as well) which will work well as portrait glass. Then again, the Olympus 45/1.8 is not that expensive, and it's a stunning, tiny, lightweight piece of glass. A little unexciting on the build quality (plastic) and for me, focal length (I prefer longer), but it's still a gem of a lens.
     
  7. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    • Like Like x 1
  8. hkpzee

    hkpzee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 5, 2011
    Hong Kong
    Patrick
  9. zapatista

    zapatista Mu-43 Top Veteran

    668
    Mar 19, 2012
    Denver, Colorado, USA
    Mike
    Showing those pics as examples what the camera/lens can do is very misleading.
    The photographer uses a lot of PP to achieve those effects. Composition and skill in post by the photographer make the photos. They're awesome, but hardly representative of what someone coming from a point and shoot should expect with a G3 with any lens combo OOC.
     
  10. hkpzee

    hkpzee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 5, 2011
    Hong Kong
    Patrick
    That's the whole point, isn't it? The OP is expecting that something like a Sony A37 would make a big difference, but in fact, a G3 is just as competent a tool in the right hands. So, rather than investing in more gears, maybe it's time to invest in photographic and PP skills.
     
  11. shiosaki

    shiosaki Mu-43 Regular

    30
    Jun 30, 2012
    thanks for using my photos as an example. i was linked here with some crazy stats on flickr haha.

    i wish to clarify that i do not use "a lot" of PP to "make" these photos.
    my workflow is pretty simple, stitch up the frames, highlights and shadows recovery or digital blending, then fine tuning in LR.

    anyway that aside, i think G3 suffers from a slightly low dynamic range. that is why you may feel that the difference between G3 and a point and shoot output is similar. but the flexibility of changing lenses and full manual controls is something you should consider.

    also, do try to get a native mount lens, no matter which lens it is. adapted lens rarely work as well as the worst native lens (of course if you are paying the same amount only). i would suggest you try out a panasonic 14mm prime lens for a start, or use more of your kit lens (choosing suitable apertures, etc). then maybe you can see some improvements in the performance of the camera, in terms of sharpness or speed. however it is dependent on what you are shooting.

    sorry for the lengthy post, and i hope you will choose to stay with the camera and understand it better :smile:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    I think there is little doubt that the problem is the optics. A DSLR with low end legacy glass would have issues as well.
     
  13. zapatista

    zapatista Mu-43 Top Veteran

    668
    Mar 19, 2012
    Denver, Colorado, USA
    Mike
    Fair enough, your sense of composition is about the best I've seen...just incredible photos.
     
  14. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Those are poor legacy lens choices. If you want to try cheap legacy lenses and see better results, try an OM 50mm 1.4 or a Takumar 50mm 1.4. Stop them both down to 2.0. Or, buy the Panasonic 20mm 1.7, 25mm 1.4 or Olympus 45mm 1.8. All of these will produce just as good results as a DSLR and better than your pocket camera.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
    Yes.

    The DSLR will also struggle with those SLR lenses.

    My advice is to spend $200 on this Sigma bundle: Sigma 19mm f/2.8 EX DN Lens and 30mm f/2.8 EX DN Lens Kit B&H

    It's back-ordered, but if you buy it now they will eventually get stock and ship it to you.

    That gives you a wide (slightly wider than normal) and a short tele (slightly longer than normal) for $200, and both will deliver great image quality.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  16. RevBob

    RevBob Super Moderator

    Jun 4, 2011
    NorthWestern PA
    Bob
    +1 - Or you could buy the Panasonic 14mm for under $200 ( not quite as good a bargain but a fine lens). Take a look at the threads here for those lenses and see which appeal to the most. A faster, better quality lens will make a big difference. :thumbup:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
  18. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    I agree that this is pretty basic stuff, but someone who has never retouched a photo and/or doesn't work in RAW (straight out of camera fans) will be hard pressed to get the most out of a MFT cam. Or even a DSLR.

    It takes a while to 'learn' basic post-processing, and it's time and money well-spent. I still go back to old shots and re-process occasionally, and though I've always been a minimalist, I'm getting better at minimalist editing :)
     
  19. acl38355

    acl38355 New to Mu-43

    8
    Jan 6, 2013
    West TN
    I want to thank everyone for their comments and advice. I do understand that these lenses I chose are not the greatest, but I bought them to see how I would like manual focusing and such. I do enjoy the manual side of photography. And I do admit that I am rather "tight" (i.e. a cheapskate) when it comes to buying certain items, but I do realize now that I need to invest in better glass. You have talked me into keeping the camera, and I appreciate it.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    I have the Olympus OM 50mm F/1.8. You can get one for less then 50$ plus an adapter for 10$. It is a very good lens even when stopped down. Take a look at this thread.

    https://www.mu-43.com/f81/olympus-50mm-f-1-8-om-image-thread-2550/

    On Ebay
    olympus om 50mm 1.8 in Lenses | eBay

    Fotga Lens Mount Adapter Olympus OM Lens to Micro 4 3 M4 3 Adapter for E P1 E P2 | eBay