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Advice needed about how to cover a church event with the gear I have!

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Ramirez, Jun 1, 2013.

  1. Ramirez

    Ramirez Mu-43 Veteran

    354
    Dec 26, 2011
    Next Friday 7.6 I'm going to cover a church event.
    It is inside so the environment is kind of dark. There will be music, speeches etc.
    I'm going to take some photos and record some video too.

    The gear I have is in my signature.

    What should I bring with me?

    I'm thinking the Fuji X100s for some low light photos and the OM-D for handheld video (I will not be able to set up a tripod). I've got the SEMA for the OM-D for sound recording.

    Advice how to use my equipment wisely and how to setup my equipment are appreciated!
     
  2. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    Well, your Fuji's can probably handle it okay -- but if you zoom the E-M5 much you will be shooting high ISO.

    If possible, I wouldn't use C-AF on the video. In low light it will hunt like crazy. Turn off continuous AF and periodically refocus as necessary with 1/2 presses.

    The stabilizer on the E-M5 is killer for video though.

    If you have to shoot over about 30mm on the E-M5 you might as well shoot the 40-150mm as it will be "brighter" than the 12-50mm. But telephoto video in low light handheld even on the E-M5 will be challenging at small apertures I think.

    If you use Auto-ISO, I'd set it to be able to float all the way up to ISO-6400 at least on the E-M5.

    No experience with Fuji's though. But what you might want to do is set the shutter speed up to at least 1/100th second to make sure you freeze normal motion -- not yours but the subjects. If the shutter speed is lower yes you'll shoot lower ISO but you will likely get more blurred shots. Generally, noise is better than blur, IMO. In fact in a dark environment with or without flash where people are moving I usually use shutter speed priority for that reason.

    All I can think of off the top of my head. You need faster lenses for the E-M5 I think for this work.
     
  3. What about a monopod?
     
  4. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    For the video that could help, yes. But he still needs a higher shutter speed for the still shots of moving people and for that a monopod doesn't do much.
     
  5. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    If the event is very important, I'd go for a dry run before the actual shooting. Check out the lighting against your equipment. I'm not a video guy, but I suspect you may have some difficulties with the sound.

    Gary
     
  6. 0dBm

    0dBm Mu-43 Top Veteran

    859
    Jun 30, 2011
    Western United States
    Gary's idea of a "dry run" is sensible.
    Will the venue allow artificial lighting? If so, a big, powerful flash with plenty of spare AA batteries is a good option. An adjustable-output video light with a large battery is a must for indoor video work. Use gels to adjust the color temperature to suit your taste.
     
  7. jloden

    jloden Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 15, 2012
    Hunterdon County, NJ
    Jay
    Dry run is a great idea.

    If the only 2 lenses you have for the OM-D are the 12-50 an 40-150 then you're going to have a lot of trouble indoors as it'll probably be too dark for them to work well.

    Given what you have now, personally I'd be taking the Fujis (X100S and X-E1). I own both and I can vouch for both the X100S and X-E1 with 35mm in low light, and the 18-55 may work if there's enough light for f/2.8-f/4.0 apertures. Do you have any flash/lighting gear at all - and would it be possible for you to use it for the stills work at least? I will say at least the X100S does have the best fill flash I've seen from a built-in flash unit, and the X-E1 can be bent back with your finger to bounce some flash off the ceiling. Better than nothing if it means getting the shot versus not.

    Last thought: you might want to consider renting a lens or two for your OM-D, and/or maybe a flash unit or two if appropriate.

    Good luck!
     
  8. dav1dz

    dav1dz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    926
    Nov 6, 2012
    Canada
    Based on your kit. X-E1 + 18-55 and X100s. Keep the 35/1.4 in the pocket for darker scenes. Sit close to the front.

    That would cover everything.
     
  9. BigTam

    BigTam Mu-43 Top Veteran

    773
    Mar 19, 2012
    Dortmund, Germany
    Ron
    I do this sort of thing sometimes, and the advice given by other posters is good - though it is unlikely you'll be allowed to use flash.

    Use the Fujis for stills: they have slightly better low-light performance. The M5 for video: IBIS helps here. Do a test video with the 40-150 beforehand to see what ISO you need.
     
  10. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    That does sound the most sensible, as I'm sure you can't use flash if you can't bring a tripod, plus you never mentioned having one in the first place. So yes, you will need a much faster lens for the still photos than what you have for the OM-D. The X100 will be your best choice in still camera, and the OM-D for video with the lens selection you have.

    You said you have the SEMA-1 kit, so I assume you're using the Olympus condenser mic that comes with it (the 3.5mm stereo adapter by itself is the EMA-1, but the SEMA-1 kit includes the ME-51S stereo microphone). You will need a pair of windscreens for that microphone, something like this: USB Microphone, Stereo Microphone, ATH-M50 Headphone, Wireless Microphone, Preamplifier, Digital Recorder, Custom Cables and more at Rock Bottom Prices from The Sound Professionals - Great deals on Microphone, Preamplifier, Digital Recorder, Cable an (I don't know if that's the exact size you want, I just picked the first item for an example). They usually come in pairs, which is good since the ME-51S stereo microphone has two mics, one for each left and right channel. Also, for a cheap but compact and effective rubber mount, you can simply use the included tie-clip extension and hang the microphone off a rubber band. I do this all the time with my ME-51S mic, and along with proper windscreens it never pics up ANY unwanted handling noise. Plus the package fits in a tiny pouch and didn't cost much more than what I was paying for the adapter anyways. If shooting hand-held I hang the mic off my flash bracket, otherwise I hang it off the tripod. Olympus makes very good audio recording equipment, and you can trust this diminutive little microphone. When used right (muffed, rubber mounted, off the camera, etc.), it's better than you would expect.
     
  11. 0dBm

    0dBm Mu-43 Top Veteran

    859
    Jun 30, 2011
    Western United States
    The prohibition on tripod usage may be because of the aisle blockage it would create. I completed a small-scale church event a few months ago wherein it was just that: a safety hazard that would have prevented efficient egress in the event of a fire or natural disaster that required all occupants to evacuate.
     
  12. Ian.

    Ian. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2013
    Munich
    Ian
    For a more stabilised video, attach something large to the camera such as a collapsed monopod or centre column from a tripod. Naturally you could buy a steadicam or similar, but supporting the camera with 2 hands set far apart e.g. one on the camera and one holding the column well below the camera will reduce hand shake enormously. Tucking a monopod in your belt is even better. Leaving both hands free to operate controls.
    If you like to make things, there are also plenty of videos on how to make a 15$ Steadicam [ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=da4dTGk-G6g&hd=1"]how to make a 15$ Steadicam[/ame].
     
  13. Ramirez

    Ramirez Mu-43 Veteran

    354
    Dec 26, 2011
    Thanks for all the input you guys given me!

    Wow! This is really the best forum on the Internet! No wonder why I wanted to come back to m4/3 after my stray... It is not the cameras or the lenses, it is the people using the m4/3 gear that are the best!

    Thank you again for all your input! I now have more ideas about how to work the event.
     
  14. Ramirez

    Ramirez Mu-43 Veteran

    354
    Dec 26, 2011
    I think that the Oly m.Zuiko 45 f1.8 lens is my next lens to purchase for my m4/3 kit. It is a great lens for video in low light if you are a bit away from the scene. I had this lens before, so I want it again!
     
  15. Ian.

    Ian. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2013
    Munich
    Ian
    Yeah! Full Frame is for jerks!
     
  16. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    I don't do a lot of video, but a legacy fast 50mm (1.4) is great for video. Because its mechanical focus, you can develop a feel for controlling focus, and the lens need not be super sharp for video. IMO anyone with m43 should have at least one legacy fast 50. They're relatively cheap, and have some excellent applications. I settled on Canon FD for mine.
     
  17. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    Yes, I am a jerk when I shoot my film cameras! :biggrin:
     
  18. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    No, no... Full Frame Digital is for jerks. Full Frame Film is just for eccentrics. ;)
     
  19. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    Ramirez, remember that you can use a tripod as a monopod by just extending one leg. FYI, may be useful in tight places.

    Gary