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Adapted lens suggestions, Nikon & Leica

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by InlawBiker, Feb 6, 2012.

  1. InlawBiker

    InlawBiker Mu-43 Veteran

    218
    Feb 1, 2012
    Seattle, WA
    Greg
    So, with my used GF1 purchase I also acquired a pair of adapters. I have a Pixco Nikon/m-43 and a Leica M adapter (unbranded).

    I used a Pentax with manual M42 lenses for a while and I found the whole process very educational. Learning to manually focus taught me a few things. I still consider myself a beginner.

    I know nothing about MF Nikons, and the only thing I know about Leica is that I can't afford them.

    So what lenses should I be looking at, between 70-135mm (native full-frame) that I can adapt, at under $200 or so? It's difficult to judge by eBay pricing what's good and what isn't.

    Ideally I would like fast sharp primes. I'm pretty happy with my Panasonic 45-200mm zoom.

    Greg.
     
  2. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    First let me say... I love your screen name, lol! :D

    I don't have any specific suggestions, but I will say that for your Leica M you should remember that you can also find M-mount lenses from Voigtlander which might be a little more affordable than the Leica or Zeiss ones. It's still a costly mount to fill though. That's why I use M39 Leica Thread Mount instead, for the really old glass. =D
     
  3. LVL8hacker

    LVL8hacker Mu-43 Veteran

    322
    Jan 4, 2012
    Pinehurst, North Carolina
    Larry Anderson
    I was just about to post a Nikon Nikkor 50mm f1.4 for sale. I own 2 of them and love it. Let me know.. :)

     
  4. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    :thumbup:The Nikkor 50mm and especially the 1.4 are great lenses and end up being the equivalent of a 100mm on FF. The Pixco mount will only accept pre-AI, AI or AI-s lenses so avoid any Nikkor with the "G" label{you would not be able to set the aperture on them}.
     
  5. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    Really, neither mount is exceptionally cheap. With Leica, you'll have smaller size, but they are hella expensive, because hey, they're Leica! Still, 90mm and 135mm lenses with slower than f/2.8 apertures might be had reasonably enough, and function well for you. With Nikon, the problem is that the Nikon F mount is not a dead mount; there are current F-mount DSLRs in production. Konica Hexanon, Minolta Rokkor MD or MC lenses, Canon FD, etc. are all cheaper to come by. Still, you can get an older non-Ai Nikon lens that either won't mount without breaking the auto-aperture tab (on the more expensive cameras like D7000 and D300), or will readily mount but won't meter on the cheaper cameras, like D3100 and D5100. They will have a letter in their name, like the Nikkor-Q 135mm f/2.8 or Nikkor-H 85mm f/1.8. With me, I just happened to have a full film setup (Nikkormat and F2), so I already had the lenses sitting around.
     
  6. InlawBiker

    InlawBiker Mu-43 Veteran

    218
    Feb 1, 2012
    Seattle, WA
    Greg
    OK thanks I guess that's what I need to know, what type of Nikkors to look for. I need to research AI & AI-s and what they are. I already have the 45mm Oly f/1.8 so no need really for the 50mm.

    Greg.
     
  7. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    Ai, Ai-s, non-Ai are just ways that the lens communicates with the camera. There is effectively no difference between all the different lenses for you. As long as the lens has an aperture ring, you'll be fine.
     
  8. fredlong

    fredlong Just this guy...

    Apr 18, 2011
    Massachusetts USA
    Fred
    You can get a Nikkor 105/2.5 for about $120-200 at B+H depending on condition. There's one there now that is non-AI and is described as "not for digital", but would actually be fine on an adapter for m4/3. It just can't be used on Nikon digital.

    A Nikkor 135/3.5 would also fall in your price range.

    Fred
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. phigmov

    phigmov Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 4, 2010
    Non-AI Nikons are often cheaper because the number of Nikon cameras that will mount/meter with them is declining (the Pro stuff usually mounts anything.

    Again, the catch is the glass is usually pretty good and the build quality of the old Nikon lenses is tank-like. This can mean they still command a decent price for adapted lens types and people that shoot video (lots of Canon to Non-AI Nikon adaptors out there for video buffs wanting full manual control).

    I'd second Neds LTM comment - you can get a small shim which lets you use LTM lenses on an M mount so you wouldn't need to buy a full-blown adaptor. You can then use Voigtlander LTM stuff (marginally cheaper than the M mount stuff).

    Other than that, adaptors are relatively cheap and the brand name legacy glass can be had for a song - you can't go to far wrong with the Nikon, Pentax, Olympus, Canon stuff from the 60's to 90's.
     
  10. LVL8hacker

    LVL8hacker Mu-43 Veteran

    322
    Jan 4, 2012
    Pinehurst, North Carolina
    Larry Anderson
    Just to give you an idea what the Nikon non-AI 50mm f/1.4 looks like. Also a shot of it on a E-PL1 with an aftermarket hood and M43 adapter.

    P2060815.

    P2060816.

    IMG-0560.
     
  11. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    The pre-AI lenses{1959-1977} would be the cheapest due to the fact they don't work well with the newer bodies. However there are not as many as you might think. The reason is many lenses were modified to the AI standard. However AI , AIs and even converted AI{called AI'd} are not that expensive because there are so many of them out there , especially certain sizes such as the 50mm. There are also aftermarket brands with this mount such as Vivitar{back then it was a good brand}. Avoid the early auto focus lenses. They tend to suck at being used manually. The AF-D lenses would be fine but those will be a bit more expensive. And as I already said do not get any AF-G lenses.

    Here is a link for more info on the AI lenses.
    Nikon F AI'd, AI, AIS Lenses
     
  12. punkman

    punkman Mu-43 Regular

    151
    Dec 30, 2011
    Europe
    There are some cheap adapters that will take G lenses.
     
  13. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    The pro stuff will NOT mount anything, as I said above. Non-ai lenses will mount on the pro bodies, but they will break part of the camera. The only cameras that Non-Ai lenses will readily mount on without issue is a Nikon camera body without a screw-drive focus motor. This ends up actually being the LOWEST END Nikons that can "mount anything." D40, D60, D3000, D3100, D5000, D5100. So, the number of bodies that can use non-Ai lenses is actually increasing. However, you end up with no metering on these low-end bodies, which is a nice exercise, but unless you are in a studio or landscape environment, it is often not practical.

    Now, even for Ai and Ai-S lenses that will mount on mid-grade cameras, but still won't meter (like the Nikon D50, D70, D80, D90), with the introduction of the slightly-above-the-D90 golden boy D7000, there is a not-pro-grade camera that will now meter with these lenses. So, even here, the number of Nikons that can use old lenses is increasing, not decreasing. So, when the OP goes to buy a Nikon lens, he is having to fight other potential buyers with Nikon digital cameras.


    Yes, but those adapters are more expensive, and when you are buying G lenses, you are paying more money for features like autofocus and image stabilization that will never work for our cameras.

    For the same price that the OP pays for Nikon lenses, he could just buy a lens that doesn't readily mount on any current digital bodies. I like to call these "dead-mount" lenses, like the Canon FD and Konica Hexanon. Heck, even a Contax G 90mm f/2.8 T* would only run about $200, and is smaller, lighter, multicoated, only about 10 years old, was probably better taken care of because most Contax people babied their uber-expensive gear, and is a Carl Zeiss lens. That's less than the going price of a Nikon 85mm. Then, the OP can buy a Minolta adapter, and a Rokkor 100mm f/2.5 or 135mm f/2.8 for less than $150. If you don't already have a separate use for Nikon lenses (i.e. another digital and/or film body), it just doesn't make economic sense. Or just do as Ned recommended above, and get a Leica M to Leica thread mount adapter, and shop there. Much much smaller lenses, and they're Leica. Although, even in M mount, the 90mm and 135mm lenses aren't that expensive.
     
  14. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    He is looking for lenses for an adaptor he already has and it isn't the type that will allow for a "G" lens.
     
  15. Jonathan F/2

    Jonathan F/2 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 10, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    My favorite Nikkor MF lenses which can all be had for $200 or under:

    28 f2.8 AIS
    50 1.4 AI/AIS
    105 2.5 AI (this version has rounded aperture blades and made famous by shooting NG's Afghan Girl)
     
  16. InlawBiker

    InlawBiker Mu-43 Veteran

    218
    Feb 1, 2012
    Seattle, WA
    Greg
    I started out looking for lenses that would match my adapter, but instead maybe I should be looking for lenses first and then the correct adapter. Anyway it's fun to learn new mounts and lenses, I'll look for an 85mm or 105mm I like and go from there I think. I have the shorter primes covered already in native Micro-4/3 I'm just missing the longer/faster stuff.
     
  17. Brian S

    Brian S Mu-43 Top Veteran

    714
    Apr 11, 2009
    The 135/3.5 will run probably half what the 105/2.5 costs. The 135/3.5 retained a Sonnar formula throughout the run, from the RF lenses of the 1950s through AIS in the 80s.

    There are two distinct 105/2.5's, the Sonnar design runs up to ~1971. If it has a chrome filter ring- probably a Sonnar.

    As for buying non-AI lenses, they should cost less. If you get a higher-end Nikon DSLR, they can be easily converted to mount and meter on the Nikon. The aperture ring is removed, and a slot is cut in it to couple and meter with the newer style cameras. A good repairman can do this for ~$30. It is also possible to find "new old Stock" aperture rings to replace the non-AI ring. I did this for several of my non-AI Nikkors. The Nikkor 28/2 is really good on my EP2. Focus to 1ft, roughly a "normal", and fast at F2. Very sharp, much sharper than my Konica 28/1.8 which goes for several times the cost.

    Lenses in Leica mount have skyrocketed in price. Unless you have a Rangefinder camera that can make use of them, you will get more lenses on other mounts for less money.
     
  18. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    Leica M-mount lenses are/were made by Leica, Cosina/Voightlander, Cosina/Zeiss, Konica, Minolta, and a few other companies like Avelon/Kobolux. The Konica RF had an M-mount and the Minolta CLE was an M-mount--the SLR lenses are not M-mount. The Konica and Minolta lenses are as good as the Leica optics--and that makes sense for Minolta as they made optics for Leica. Leica tread mount lenses (LTM) are cheaper and older and easily converted to an M-mount. There are tons of Russian LTM optics as well. I have a 90mm CLE lens for my E-P1.
     
  19. phigmov

    phigmov Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 4, 2010
    Doh. My bad. Thanks for the correction. My Nikon bodies are limited to the pro F film bodies with the flip up tab and stop-down metering capability for the non-AI's.

    In case anyones interested Thom Hogan has useful compatibility table (including the new Nikon J/V series) - Nikkor Lens Information by Thom Hogan